Category: Georgia Political News

25
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 25, 2014

On September 25, 1789, Congress adopted the first twelve amendments, called the Bill of Rights, to the United States Constitution. A little more than two years later, in 1791, enough states had ratified ten of the Amendments, with two not receiving sufficient support.

bill-of-rights-hero-lg

On September 25, 1864, Confederate President Jefferson Davis met with General John Bell Hood and visited troops at Palmetto, Georgia.

Ronald Reagan appointee Sandra Day O’Connor became the first female Justice of the United States on September 25, 1981. In an interview with Terry Gross, she recalled receiving the call from President Reagan:

“I was working in my office on the Arizona Court of Appeals,” she tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “I was at the court in my chambers when the telephone rang. And it was the White House calling for me, and I was told that the president was waiting to speak to me. That was quite a shock, but I accepted the phone call, and it was President Reagan, and he said, ‘Sandra?’ ‘Yes, Mr. President?’ ‘Sandra, I’d like to announce your nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court tomorrow. Is that all right with you?’ Well, now, that’s kind of a shock, wouldn’t you say?”

On September 25, 2008, the last car came off the line at GM’s Doraville Plant

Given that last historical tidbit, it’s fitting that yesterday, the site of the GM Doraville Plant was bought by Egbert Perry’s Integral Group, which will lead in the redevelopment of the facility. From the Atlanta Business Chronicle:

Money changed hands on Wednesday. “As of a few hours ago we officially closed. We own the GM site,” Perry told Atlanta Business Chronicle.

Now work will begin to turn the 162 acres just north of Atlanta into 20 blocks of office buildings, housing, stores and restaurants.

Now the focus turns to at least eight months of demolition and the removal of 78,000 tons of scrap metal and other salvageable materials left after the plant closed in 2008.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

DealCarter09252014

If your first reaction upon hearing that 11Alive’s polling moved from Deal +1 to Carter +1 over the last two weeks, relax. It’s not really a difference. It’s well within the margin of error and a net 2 point change is meaningless. The real headline is that nobody is paying attention to the elections yet, and nothing is changing. Libertarian Andrew Hunt’s 4-point share is unchanged.Continue Reading..

24
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 24, 2014

James Oglethorpe was named Commissioner of Indian Affairs and Charles Wesley was named Secretary of Indian Affairs by the Georgia Trustees in London on September 24, 1735.

The Judiciary Act of 1789, which established the first federal judicial system, was adopted on September 24, 1789 with the signature of President Georgia Washington. Under the Act, the original size of the Supreme Court was five Associate Justices and a Chief Justice. Washington nominated John Jay as Chief Justice, and John Rutledge, William Cushing, John Blair, Robert Harrison, and James Wilson as Associates.

Also established on September 24, 1789 were the office of Attorney General of the United States and the United States Post Office Department.

On September 24, 1862, the Confederate Congress adopted the Seal of the Confederate States of America.

The Decatur Female Seminary opened with 60 students on September 24, 1889 and would later be chartered as Agnes Scott College.

On September 24, 1960, USS Enterprise CVN-65, was launched from Newport News Shipbuilding in Norfolk, Virginia, the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Enterprise was inactivated on December 1, 2012.

The Warren Commission report on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was delivered to President Lyndon B. Johnson on September 24, 1964.

On September 24, 1976, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter resumed campaigning after the first debate against President Gerald Ford.On September 24, 1979, CompuServe offered the first dial-up computer information service to consumers.

Launched as MicroNET in 1979 and sold through Radio Shack stores, the service turned out to be surprisingly popular, thanks perhaps to Radio Shack’s Tandy Model 100 computers, which were portable, rugged writing machines that dovetailed very nicely with the fledgling, 300-baud information service.

MicroNET was renamed the CompuServe Information Service in 1980. Around the same time, CompuServe began working with newspapers to offer online versions of their news stories, starting with the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch in 1980. At least 10 major newspapers were offering online editions through CompuServe by 1982, including The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the San Francisco Examiner.

On September 24, 2009, it was announced that the College Football Hall of Fame would move to Atlanta, where it opened on August 23, 2014.

Carter steps in it

Quite possibly the worst idea the Jason Carter campaign brain trust has had was to propose using the Teachers Retirement to invest in startup firms.

The Democrat argues in his economic pivot  that he wants teacher pensions to be able to pump funds into local startups “so long as we’re making sure that we can manage the risk in ways that make sense.” He sees it as a way to boost a state-backed effort to invest in venture capital firms that…has lagged.

“The things that concern the teachers is to make sure you’re stewarding the pension appropriately. So it’s crucial to make sure that we are managing the risk in ways that works,” he said. “But we shouldn’t have those pension funds losing out on higher growths and higher returns just because of artificial caps on what it can do.”

Essentially, he wants to start strip-mining the teachers’ pension system to “invest” in risky new companies. The two problems with this are (a) teachers are apoplectic at the idea of using their retirement funds for risky investments; and (b) the government doesn’t have a very good track record of picking winning investments.Continue Reading..

23
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 23, 2014

Bon Homme Richard

John Paul Jones, at the helm of US ship Bonhomme Richard, won a naval battle off the coast of England on September 23, 1779.

After inflicting considerable damage to the Bonhomme Richard, Richard Pearson, the captain of the Serapis, asked Jones if he had struck his colors, the naval sign indicating surrender. From his disabled ship, Jones replied, “I have not yet begun to fight,” and after three more hours of furious fighting the Serapis and Countess of Scarborough surrendered to him.

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark returned to St. Louis Missouri from their exploratory trip to the Pacific coast on September 23, 1806.

On September 23, 1944, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was speaking at a dinner with the Teamsters union and addressed attacks that had been made by Republicans, including the allegation that after leaving his dog, Fala, behind in the Aleutian Islands, he sent a Navy destroyer to fetch the dog. This would become known as the “Fala speech.”

These Republican leaders have not been content with attacks on me, or my wife, or on my sons. No, not content with that, they now include my little dog, Fala. Well, of course, I don’t resent attacks, and my family don’t resent attacks, but Fala does resent them. You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I’d left him behind on an Aleutian island and had sent a destroyer back to find him—at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three, or eight or twenty million dollars—his Scotch soul was furious. He has not been the same dog since. I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself … But I think I have a right to resent, to object, to libelous statements about my dog.

The idea for the joke was given to FDR by Orson Welles. The political lesson here is that any time you get an audience laughing at your opponent, you are winning.

A statue of former Georgia Governor Eugene Talmadge on the grounds of the Georgia State Capitol was unveiled on September 23, 1949, the 65th anniversary of Talmadge’s birth near Forsyth, Georgia in 1884.

On September 23, 1952, Senator Richard M. Nixon was under fire for allegedly accepting $18,000 and using it for personal expenses. To salvage his place as the Vice Presidential candidate on Eisenhower’s Republican ticket, Nixon took to the airwaves in the first nationally-televised address and delivered what came to be known as the “Checkers Speech. From The Atlantic:

[A] 1999 poll of leading communication scholars ranked the address as the sixth most important American speech of the 20th century — close behind the soaring addresses of Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

The “Checkers” speech wins this high rank for one stand-out reason: It marked the beginning of the television age in American politics. It also salvaged Nixon’s career, plucking a last-second success from the jaws of abject humiliation, and profoundly shaped Nixon’s personal and professional outlook, convincing him that television was a way to do an end-run around the press and the political “establishment.”

Click here for the full text of the “Checkers Speech.”

On September 23, 1976, President Gerald Ford and former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter met in their first televised debate.

The last game played in Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium took place on September 23, 1996.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Latest Polling

Rasmussen has released polls on the Gubernatorial and Senatorial races. In the Gubernatorial race:

Nathan Deal………………45%
Jason Carter………………44%
Some other candidate…..3%
Undecided…………………..8%

And in the race for United States Senate:

David Perdue………………46%
Michelle Nunn…………….41%
Some other candidate……4%
Undecided……………………9%

It is a fundamental flaw and a sign of laziness in a poll of Georgia elections to not include the name of the third party candidates.

The Washington Post column on politics called The Fix wrote yesterday that Republicans are a slight favorite to gain control of the Senate, and specifically,

For those wondering about Kentucky and Georgia — Democrats’ other two pickup opportunities — both seem to be fading from sight.  All three models show Republicans with a strong chance of holding both seats. In Kentucky, the probabilities range from 85 percent to 99 percent; in Georgia it ranges from a 77 percent chance of a Republican victory to a 95 percent one.

Forget the “War on Women,” it’s a “War for Women’s Votes”

Yesterday saw duelling press events at the Georgia State Capitol. From Greg Bluestein, writing for the AJC:

We’ll start with Perdue’s presser, which focused on two EEOC complaints that Nunn’s camp unintentionally exposed in the infamous series of memos that leaked this summer. State Rep. Lynne Riley and other GOPers wrote a letter demanding that Nunn release the complaints, which haven’t been made public yet.

“The only way for Georgians to know the truth is for you to voluntarily release this information,” said the letter. “Why haven’t you done so already?”

They then marched over to Nunn’s event to deliver that letter to the Democrat’s campaign manager, a stoic Jeff DiSantis, as a few dozen Nunn supporters chanted “go blue” and “equal pay.” As you can see in the above video, they were briefly held up by state troopers.

Once the Republican gaggle was out of earshot, the Democrats proceeded to pummel Perdue over whether he’d back the stalled-out Paycheck Fairness Act. That bill aims to narrow the persistent pay discrepancy between women and men.

“All we want to do is go to work and be treated as equals, leave behind gender-based discrimination,” said Orrock, an Atlanta Democrat.

Here’s why the Democrats are talking about Paycheck Fairness, from polling earlier this year:

Republican voters divide on gender lines, with a majority of Republican women supporting the plan (54%) and more than a third (36%) of Republican men supporting it. Independent women are also strong supporters, 61% favor the plan as well as 49% of Independent men.

A strong majority (60%) of voters are also likely to use a candidate’s support for policies that have a direct impact on working families as a vote-determinant. This includes 84% of Democratic women, 57% of Independent women and 53% of Republican women.

Women Poll Table

Polls of the Georgia Senate race consistently show a gender gap, with Republican David Perdue leading among men and Democrat Michelle Nunn leading among women.

The distinction was sharpened in an Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll released Sunday. Democrat Jason Carter led Republican Gov. Nathan Deal by 10 points with female voters, and women gave Michelle Nunn a three-point advantage over Republican David Perdue in the Senate contest. Other recent polls have portrayed an even wider gap between male and female voters.

Susan Carroll, a Rutgers University political scientist who has studied the gap, said ultimately many women end up voting on the “kitchen table” issues such as the economy and education.

“Men are much more likely to be in favor of cutting back on government than women are,” Carroll said. “Women, even if they want to cut back, care more about protecting the safety net. Over time, that’s factored pretty seriously into the gender gap.”

Rural Georgia in play?

Rural issues in the Senate election are also getting significant attention. Rural health care has become a Rorschach test for the candidates’ views on Obamacare.

In an updated election guide, produced by Healthcare Georgia Foundation, the two candidates answer a new question about rural health care.

In her response, Nunn, a Democrat, calls for expansion of the Medicaid program in the state as outlined by the Affordable Care Act.

Expansion “would enable over 600,000 low-income Georgians to sign up for Medicaid and allow rural hospitals to receive payments for services to people who were previously uninsured,” Nunn said. “By not expanding Medicaid, Georgia will lose $33.7 billion in federal funding from 2013 to 2022, while our tax dollars are spent in other states.”

Perdue, rather than implement more of the ACA, would go in the opposite direction. The Republican candidate supports a plan by U.S. Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., to repeal the ACA and embrace free-market solutions to the problems of health care.

He blasts the ACA, often known as Obamacare, for ending government payments to hospitals that treat a large share of low-income patients, and for “driving insurance companies out of many underserved areas, and causing health care premiums to spike on the remaining plans.”

Democrats see rural voters as a group where they can make headway.

While Kentucky’s electorate is more rural than Georgia on a percentage basis, the Peach State has many more rural voters based on population. Democratic nominee Michelle Nunn is trying to run as a centrist in the mold of her father, Sam, whose long career in the Senate ran from 1972 to 1996.

While Democrats point to the growing numbers of African-American and Latino voters as a sign of the state’s purple-trending demographics, the fact is that a significant infusion of rural voters in central and south Georgia will have to cast a ballot for Nunn if she is to defeat businessman David Perdue for the seat held by outgoing Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss.

Keith McCants of tiny Oglethorpe, Ga. is perhaps his state’s most knowledgeable expert on rural politics, and he has a lot to say about what Nunn needs to do to be competitive over the final weeks in the rural counties.

McCants, who runs the respected Peanut Politics blog, said Nunn has two tasks in wooing rural voters. First, she must motivate “Obamacrats,” the rural black voters in the 1st, 2nd and 8th Congressional Districts who don’t come out to midterm elections like they do when Obama’s name is on the ballot. Second, McCants says Nunn needs independents and voters 55 and older to break her way. “Everyone assumes if you’re white and rural, you’re a Republican,” he laments.

As for Nunn’s field operation, McCants notes places like Tifton and Waycross have no organizers while “Perdue has a ground game [in the rural counties] and its going strong.”

 

22
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 22, 2014

On September 22, 1862, Republican President Abraham Lincoln issued a preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, which stated,

“. . . on the first day of January [1863] . . . all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

1024px-Chickamauga

On September 20, 1863, the Confederate Army of the Tennessee under General Braxton Bragg repelled Union forces under General William Rosencrans at the Battle of Chickamauga. After Gettysburg, Chickamauga is generally considered the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War, with 18,500 Confederate casualties and 16,100 Union dead.

800px-Cannon_Row Chickamauga

On September 21, 1863, the federal Army of the Cumberland retreated to Chattanooga after its defeat at Chickamauga.

President Rutherford B. Hayes visited Atlanta on September 22, 1877.

White vigilantes seeking to assault African-Americans after reports of four white women being assaulted led to the Atlanta Race Riots on September 22-24, 1906, which would claim the lives of at least 25 African-Americans and one white person.

On September 22, 1918, the City of Atlanta gasoline administator prohibited non-emergency Sunday driving to conserve fuel for the war effort.

On September 20, 1976, Playboy magazine released an interview with Jimmy Carter, then a candidate for President.

Bert Lance resigned as Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Jimmy Carter on September 21, 1977. After a jury acquitted him on ten federal charges in 1980, Lance served as Chair of the Democratic Party of Georgia from 1982 to 1985.

General Colin Powell was confirmed by the Senate Armed Services Committee as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on September 21. 1989. Powell served as National Security Advisor to President Ronald Reagan before being appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by President George H.W. Bush; in 2000, Powell was nominated by President George W. Bush as Secretary of State, the first African-American to hold that post.

On September 20, 1992, Atlanta Braves David Justice, Brian Hunter, Ron Gant, and Mark Lemke hit home runs in the 6th inning of a 16-1 victory over the Houston Astros.

Friends debuted on NBC on September 22, 1994.

On September 21, 2011, R.E.M. announced on their website that they were quitting as a band.

Michelle Nunn, Deceptive Democrat Dinged on Truthiness

Michelle Nunn, whose makeover from nonprofit maven to Senate candidate is the most drastic we’ve ever seen, apparently went so far as to alter the story of her life, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Politifact.Continue Reading..

18
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 18, 2014

The United States government took out its first loan on September 18, 1789, the proceeds of which were used to pay the salaries of the President, and First Congress. On the same day, future President Thomas Jefferson wrote a letter to E. Rutledge in which he requested that a shipment of olive trees be sent via Baltimore.

President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the United States Capitol on September 18, 1793.

We know from that newspaper article, and from Masonic ritual, that Washington placed an inscribed silver plate under the cornerstone at the southeast corner of this building. However, we do not know whether that meant the southeast corner of the Senate wing, the first section of the building to be completed, or the southeast corner of the whole building as intended, which would locate it over on the House side. Two centuries later, the Architect of the Capitol is still searching for that cornerstone. Metal detectors have failed to locate the silver plate.

President Millard Fillmore signed the Fugitive Slave Act on September 18, 1850, requiring that slaves be returned to their owners even if they were in a free state.

General Robert E. Lee retreated from Antietam Creek on September 18, 1862, following the bloodiest day of fighting in the Civil War.

On September 18, 1973, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter filed a report claiming that he saw an Unidentified Flying Object in the sky above Leary, Georgia in 1969.

Carter was preparing to give a speech at a Lions Club meeting. At about 7:15 p.m (EST), one of the guests called his attention to a strange object that was visible about 30 degrees above the horizon to the west of where he was standing. Carter described the object as being bright white and as being about as bright as the moon. It was said to have appeared to have closed in on where he was standing but to have stopped beyond a stand of pine trees some distance from him. The object is then said to have changed color, first to blue, then to red, then back to white, before appearing to recede into the distance. Carter felt that the object was self-luminous, but not a solid in nature. Carter’s report indicates that it was witnessed by about ten or twelve other people, and was in view for ten to twelve minutes before it passed out of sight.

Click here to view a copy of the report, allegedly on file at the Carter Center.

The Georgia General Assembly approved a new state Constitution on September 18, 1981, which was placed on the 1982 ballot and after approval by voters, went into effect in 1983.

On September 18, 1990, Atlanta was announced as the location for the 1996 Summer Olympic games.

Ted Turner announced on September 18, 1997 his intent to donate $1 billion to the United Nations.Continue Reading..

12
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 12, 2014

James Oglethorpe arrived at Augusta on September 12, 1739, 275 years ago today.

The Second Continental Congress opened in Philadelphia on September 13, 1775; Georgia was represented by Archibald Bulloch, Lyman Hall,  John Houstoun, and John Zubly.

French troops arrived near Savannah to prepare for a siege against British forces there on September 12, 1779.

On September 13, 1788, the Confederation Congress voted to implement the Constitution and authorized states to elect Senators and Representatives and called the first Presidential election, with selection of presidential electors in the states to be held on January 7, 1789, and February 4, 1789 as the day electors would cast their ballots.

Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” on September 14, 1814.

On September 14, 1885, Georgia Governor Henry McDaniel signed legislation granting up to 200 acres in Fulton and DeKalb Counties to the federal government to be used in the constuction of Fort McPherson, which was named after Union Maj. Gen. James McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.

On September 14, 1901, President William McKinley died of infection of gunshot wounds suffered eight days earlier.

The first two women to enter the Georgia General Assembly, Viola Ross Napier of Bibb County and Atlanta Constitution reporter Bessie Kempton of Fulton County, were elected on September 13, 1922.

 

Republicans Valdosta

A group of Georgia Republicans went to see Dr. Ben Carson speak at Valdosta State.

What’s wrong with Sunday elections?

Fulton County has added two Sunday voting dates with seven locations across the county open the first Sabbath voting day and nineteen locations the second. Lowndes County in South Georgia will add a Sunday voting location in Valdosta.Continue Reading..

11
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 11, 2014

911 memorial 2

I was in my car that morning, on the way to my job when I heard on the radio of the first plane hitting. The announcers thought at first that it must be a small plane and likely an accident. Seventeen minutes later all doubt vanished as the second hit. Over the next hour, a third plane hit the Pentagon and a fourth went down in a field in Pennsylvania. We watched on television as the towers burned, then collapsed.

Shortly afterwards, the Family Room opened in a nearby tower to provide a place for loved ones to grieve out of the public eye.

The Family Room opened in April 2002 in space donated by Brookfield Office Properties, the owners of 1 Liberty Plaza, across Church Street from the trade center site. By presenting what was known as a medical examiner’s family identification card, victims’ relatives were admitted during regular workdays and at night, on weekends and on holidays.

On the 20th floor, behind a door marked “The Family Room,” relatives could settle into ample leather couches or stand at windows 15 and 20 feet wide. The room was intended for “quiet contemplation,” said a 2002 notice from the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, which created and maintained the space, just a few doors down from its own headquarters and those of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center Foundation.

When the Family Room at 1 Liberty Plaza was replaced this summer by a new private gathering space in the National September 11 Memorial Museum pavilion, the [New York] State Museum and the memorial museum painstakingly documented the older room, and the State Museum acquired what contents family members themselves did not choose to reclaim.

There are materials in the Family Room collection related to about 1,000 victims, Mr. Schaming said, or roughly one-third of all casualties that day. “It is the most singular collection of the faces of people who were killed on 9/11,” he said.

One day after Perry’s victory in the Battle of Lake Erie, American Master Commandant Thomas Macdonough led American forces in the Battle of Plattsburg at Lake Champlain, New York on September 11, 1813.

The Union Army began evacuating civilians from Atlanta via Lovejoy’s Station on September 11, 1864.

Georgia-born Ty Cobb took his last at-bat on September 11, 1928.

After a week-long Presidential campaign swing through ten states, former Governor Jimmy Carter returned to Plains on September 11, 1976. At the time Republicans said he was too liberal; today they say that about his grandson, Democrat Jason Carter.

On September 11, 1985, Pete Rose broke Ty Cobb’s career hit record, notching number 4,192 against the San Diego Padres.

A New Show on GPB

GPB Political Rewind 09102014 600px

Last night, I was honored to appear in the inaugural episode of Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new TV show called Political Rewind with BIll Nigut, Jim Galloway of the AJC and Georgia State House Democratic Leader Stacey Abrams.

We’ll post a link to video if they get it online soon, but you can put it on your weekly schedule for 7 PM Wednesday evenings on your local GPB station.

New Poll from 11Alive Deceptive

Yesterday, 11Alive released a new poll in a story that is sloppy at best, deceptive at worst.

ATLANTA — A new exclusive scientific poll shows the race for Georgia’s governor is statistically tied. The poll was commissioned by 11Alive and conducted by Survey USA.

Over the past three weeks, since an identical poll was conducted by SurveyUSA on behalf of 11Alive, incumbent Republican Nathan Deal has watched a 9-point lead evaporate.

Forty-five percent of registered likely voters plan to vote for Jason Carter, 44% for Nathan Deal. The margin of error is +/- 4.2%, so they are statistically tied.

The part I want to discuss is where 11Alive says the polls were “identical.” That simply isn’t true. I’ve discussed at length the importance of weighting, and specifically the assumption about what percentage of voters will be African-American.Continue Reading..

10
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 10, 2014

An American fleet of nine ships under the command of Captain Oliver Hazard Perry routed a British fleet in the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813.

After the battle, Perry sent a famous dispatch to U.S. General William Henry Harrison that read, “We have met the enemy, and they are ours.” The Battle of Lake Erie forced the British to abandon Detroit, ensuring U.S. control over Lake Erie and the territorial northwest.

On September 10, 1991, Senate confirmation hearings began for Georgia-born Clarence Thomas, who was appointed by President George H.W. Bush (41) to the United States Supreme Court.

Nirvana’s Smells Like Teen Spirit was released as a single on September 10, 1991.

On September 10, 2002, the Atlanta Braves clinched an eleventh straight division title without playing, as a loss by the Philadelphia Phillies assured the Braves the title.

Hope for America

Cry Out America will hold a prayer event at the Georgia State Capitol on Thursday, September 11, 2014 from 11 AM to 1 PM inside the Capitol near the South Steps.

Voter Fraud Allegations against Democratic organization

At least six county voter registration offices have reported suspected voter registration fraud linked to The New Georgia Project, according to WSB-TV.Continue Reading..

25
Aug

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for August 25, 2014

On August 25, 325, the Council of Nicea adopted the Nicene Creed.

On August 25, 1864, Union troops stopped artillery bombardment of Atlanta and withdrew from fortifications around the city. On the same day, in Virginia, Confederate forces attacked Federals under Gen. Grant at Ream’s Station.

On August 25, 1877, delegates to the state Constitutional Convention approved a new post-Reconstruction state Constitution, the seventh in state history, to be submitted to the voters on December 5, 1877.

The all-time highest score in a professional baseball game was recorded on August 25, 1922, as the Chicago Cubs beat the Philadelphia Phillies by 26-23.

Paris was liberated from German army control on August 25, 1944.

On August 25, 1950, President Harry S. Truman ordered the seizure of the nation’s private railroads by executive order.


Our photo selections from Gould Hagler show two different shots of the same monument, the state’s second oldest Confederate monument in Griffin, Georgia. Here’s what it looked like before a cleaning and restoration.

Gould Hagler

And after cleaning and restoration:

Gould Hagler Griffin2

Gould’s book, Georgia’s Confederate Monuments: In Honor of a Fallen Nation, is available for ordering online from Mercer University Press. We receive no compensation for running these, and paid for our own copy.

 


 

Happy Birthday to Georgia Governor Nathan Deal

I didn’t get you anything, but you have my support and on November 4, 2014, I’ll vote to re-elect Governor Deal.

Nydia Tisdale arrested at Dawsonville GOP Rally

Nydia Tisdale is a Forsyth County political activist who has made a name of herself by shooting video at public meetings and political events and posting them on YouTube.

She’s not always welcomed. In 2012, Cumming Mayor H. Ford Gravitt had her removed from a meeting of the Cumming City Council.

Attorney General Sam Olens disagreed with the City’s video policy.

Olens filed suit in Forsyth County Superior Court against the city of Cumming and Mayor H. Ford Gravitt for the alleged violation of Georgia open meetings law on June 5, 2012.

On the same day of the alleged [2012] violations, Gov. Nathan Deal signed into law the updated version of Georgia’s Sunshine Law.

The law says that a person is allowed to make visual and audio recordings at a public meeting. The new law, which went into effect the same day, provides for visual and sound recordings of public meetings and authorizes the attorney general to sue violators and seek penalties.

This past Saturday, Tisdale uploaded to YouTube a video she shot of Gov. Nathan Deal, Senate candidate David Perdue and others at the North Fulton Victory 2014 Rally held earlier this month.Continue Reading..

23
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 23, 2014

We are now 104 days from the General Election on November 4, 2014.

Once again, the Battle of Atlanta provides us with our metaphor for today. On July 23, 1864, Union and Confederate forces in and around Atlanta gathered the dead and worked to save the wounded. Union artillery began bombarding Atlanta.

Former President Ulysses S. Grant died on July 23, 1885.

The Cleveland Metropolitan Park District was established on July 23, 1917 and currently has a set of beautiful parks winding through the city. If you’re going to be in Cleveland for the 2016 Republican National Convention, take some time to tour the city, including the parks. When I visit my mother and grandmother in Cleveland, I regularly see deer in the parks in Shaker Heights, and outside my grandmother’s retirement home. We’re thirty years past the “mistake on the Lake“ era, and you’ll be missing out if you don’t get to learn about the city.

I’m planning on attending the 2016 Convention and may set up an event or two for my fellow Republicans who are there from Georgia. Stay tuned.

John Smoltz started his first game as a major league pitcher on July 23, 1988, as the Braves took a win over the New York Mets.

Hopefully this won’t be another metaphor for the election, but Great White Sharks have been spotted off the coast of Georgia.

he message from shark researchers sums it up: “Female shark hotspot?” tweeted the nonprofit Ocearch Tuesday afternoon. “Lydia, Genie & Mary Lee are off the coast of #Savannah, GA!”

All three great white sharks are fitted with satellite tags that last located them more than 100 miles off Savannah.

Campaigns and Elections

Today, we begin the General Election campaign for United States Senate, Governor, and for the “Shafer Amendment,” which will constitutionally limit the ability of the General Assembly to raise the state income tax rate. Visit CapTheTax.com to learn more and if you’re a leader in a local, district, or the state GOP, consider working to put your organization on the record as supporting Amendment One on the November ballot.

I’m not going to spend too much time on last night’s elections. I want to digest what happened, and there’s plenty of direct information out there on the news sites. We’ll spend a few minutes recapping yesterday’s election results and talking about lessons we learned.

What I learned yesterday

The important thing is not being right every time, but learning something every time you are wrong. That’s a valuable insight whether you’re talking about political prognostication or something else.

Taking the view of “I learned a lesson” when you’re beaten, knocked down, or just wrong on the internet also has the benefit of lifting your mood. One of my favorite websites that isn’t about politics has a short video on this valuable life lesson.

1. The first time I was a guest on GPB’s new radio show “Political Rewind” a couple weeks ago, I learned that when I’m the proper distance from the microphone, my 40-something year old eyes can’t focus on the mic’s windscreen, and there’s something disorienting about being that close to something you can’t focus your eyes on. Of course, vanity won’t let me simply get glasses for this.

There’s a reason we have a lot of metaphors like “can’t see the forest for the trees” or “preaching to the choir.” The problem is that it’s hard to see what’s going on among the majority of Republican Primary voters who are not activists or party types. A message to those folks who are disconnected from politics can connect in a way that moves them without necessary being visible to those who are concentrating on the party structure and activists.

For those of us involved in the General Election as pundits, professionals, or players, we need to learn this lesson and apply it.

2. David Perdue’s challenge will be to take the support he has received in the Primary and Primary Runoff from people who are not involved in the political process and try to make a coherent organization or movement out of people who are resistant to being part of the political process.

Perdue will inherit much of Jack Kingston’s organization the same way Kingston gained from Karen Handel, and he should take the time to figure out how Kingston’s volunteers and staff can best be brought into the tent. But he also has to recognize the limitations of that organization and of his own – if we couldn’t see the breadth of his support, it will be hard to identify those who voted for him and ensure they come back out in November and don’t fall for an outsider message from the other side.

3. We’re behind the eight-ball. Michelle Nunn has a lead in the polls, and $2.3 million in the bank. I still think Republicans are favored in the fall, but we have to get it together and that starts tomorrow. Sleep in and lick your wounds today, but be prepared to take the field tomorrow.

4. The Georgia Republican Party needs to consider whether it’s promoting a message today that connects with the broader electorate or whether they’re “preaching to the choir.”

Democratic Party of Georgia Chairman Dubose Porter released a statement last night that indicates what we’re in for from the DPG and the Michelle Nunn and Jason Carter campaigns: three months and twelve days of all-out class warfare. From Porter’s statement:

“There is a clear contrast in this race between Michelle Nunn, a leader who has spent the last 25 years leading volunteer organizations and lifting communities up, and David Perdue, someone who has spent his career enriching himself while often times tearing companies and communities apart,” said Democratic Party of Georgia Chair DuBose Porter. “Georgians want leaders who will fix the mess in Washington, not someone who puts personal profit ahead of regular people.”

So, we’re going to hear a lot about Pillowtex and a lot about what a greedy bunch the Republican party and their Wall Street cronies are. Major issues will be the gender gap in pay, Citizens United and the role of big money in politics, and the minimum wage.

Expect also to see Michelle Nunn on all the morning shows today and the rest of the week.

Runoff Roundup

As of this morning, David Perdue holds a roughly 8500-vote lead over Jack Kingston, besting the 22-year Congressman by less than a 51-49 margin. From Walter Jones with Morris News:

With all but two Georgia counties reporting their final vote tallies as of 7:30 a.m., Perdue had 50.9 percent to Kingston’s 49.1 percent. The difference was about 8,600 votes out of more than 482,000 ballots cast.

Voters said they were fed up with the situation in Washington and wanted a change. Perdue, a political newcomer convinced them he was better able to bring change than Kingston, a 22-year veteran of Congress.

“David offered voters a clear alternative to the typical politicians,” said his spokesman Derrick Dickey. “As a political outsider and first-time candidate, his message resonated with voters who are fed up with business as usual in Washington.”

Kingston told supporters that when he called Perdue to concede he had a simple message for the victor about the general election.

“Don’t call me. I’m on your team,” Kingston recounted. “This is so much bigger than David Perdue or Jack Kingston. It is about taking over the U.S. Senate and turning America around.”

Wednesday morning will be the first day of the general-election campaign. Perdue must immediately shift his sights from attacking his fellow Republican to blasting Democratic nominee Michelle Nunn. She’ll be fighting back, and both sides will have large financial commitments from political-action committees.

“Tomorrow it becomes more of a national race with a lot of outside groups weighing in, but we plan to keep our nucleus,” Kingston said.

Even closer is the margin between State School Superintendent candidates Richard Woods (199,071 votes) and Mike Buck (198,343 votes). The race will almost certainly have a recount. From the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

First, a crowded primary. Then, a runoff that doesn’t run either candidate off the ballot.

Now, the race between Mike Buck and Richard L. Woods, the two Republican candidates for Georgia school superintendent, appears to be headed for a recount.

Woods, a longtime educator from Irwin County making his second bid for superintendent, held a paper-thin edge over Buck, the chief academic officer for the Georgia Department of Educator. With nearly all of the state’s counties reporting their results late Tuesday night, that edge was within the 1 percent threshold that would give Buck the right to request a recount. He told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that he would request a recount if the margin turns out to be closer than 1 percent.

“We would all like to have some closure, but it looks like sometime tomorrow at the very earliest before we’ll know,” Buck said from his campaign headquarters late Tuesday night. “So, we’ll stick it out and see what happens.”

Democrat Valarie Wilson took her party’s nomination over State Rep. Alisha Thomas Morgan. From the Athens Banner-Herald and Morris News:

Wilson won with 53.4 percent of the vote over Alisha Thomas Morgan, an Austell legislator, who garnered 46.6 percent, as of 10:50 p.m.

Kerwin Swint, political science professor at Kennesaw State University, said the support from established organizations likely helped Wilson.

“It’s about infrastructure,” he said. “Getting out the vote is something where, if you have the establishment behind you, you have people manning the phones, you have people willing to hand out literature.”

While Wilson has support of large education groups like the Georgia Association of Educators through her connections as former City of Decatur school board member and former Georgia School Board Association president, Morgan had sought the support of Democrats in favor of education reform and school-choice. She also had the backing of some national school-choice organizations, which rankled with some Georgia Democrats.

In Congressional District One, State Senator Buddy Carter beat Dr. Bob Johnson.

Carter won 53 percent of the votes, while his opponent, Bob Johnson, garnered 46 percent.

Johnson, a surgeon from Isle of Hope, ran as a political outsider in support of term limits and firmly against the Affordable Care Act also known as Obamacare. His success came from the lower half of the district in Glynn and Camden counties and a few small counties.

Johnson claimed he was supported by about 85 percent of local tea party members and virtually all tea partiers nationally, including former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, who lent her support after a last-minute “gentle probe.” The Club for Growth, FreedomWorks and a few other conservative groups backed him also.

But behind Carter were key mainline conservatives, including many area mayors and sheriffs, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. He also positioned himself closely to the Republican incumbent, Jack Kingston, a longtime Savannah congressman running in a closely watched U.S. Senate primary runoff.

The Republican nominee is heavily favored against Democratic nominee Brian Reese of Savannah in the Nov. 4 general election.

Carter, the primary’s top vote-getter, ran in favor of tax reform, reining in the national debt, balancing the budget, repealing Obamacare, and protecting gun rights – picking up a National Rifle Association endorsement.

He said he felt most confident of his popularity in his state Senate district, western counties and some areas down south where he was banking on endorsements from such people as a third place primary rival to pay electoral dividends.

Jody Hice, the ideological and stylistic heir to Dr. Paul Broun, took the GOP nomination in the Tenth District, which opened when Broun ran for U.S. Senate.

With 54 percent of 49,632 votes recorded by 10:45 p.m. Tuesday, Hice dominated the 10th District, winning 15 of its 25 counties.

Hice, a conservative radio host from Walton County, took first place in the May 20 primary with 37 percent of the total vote. Mike Collins, a trucking company owner from Jackson, came in second in the primary with 33 percent.

Clarke County voters preferred Collins, though. He earned about 62 percent of about 3,700 votes cast in the race here, while his lead in neighboring Oconee County hovered around 52 percent of the total vote late Tuesday. Hice took Barrow County with 68 percent of 4,446 votes.

More than half of Hice’s margin came from Walton County, his home and the most populous county in the district that sprawls across eastern Georgia. With 8826 votes cast in yesterday’s runoff, Walton County produced more votes than it did in May’s Republican Primary.

Barry Loudermilk handily won the 11th District over Bob Barr.

As of midnight, with all precincts in every county reporting, Loudermilk had received a total of 34,641 votes or 66 percent compared to Barr’s 17,794 votes or 34 percent.
Loudermilk’s lead was smaller in Cobb County, which he won with 59 percent of the vote to Barr’s 41 percent. Loudermilk took home 13,591 votes in Cobb County, while Barr received 9,314. In total, 22,905 of the 52,435 votes that had been tallied at press time were cast in Cobb County.
Loudermilk said he felt “awesome” after his win, though he added the victory was still sinking in.
“My heart goes out to everybody that went to the polls and elected me to this position,” he said. “It’s people responding to a positive message that there is hope for America we get our nation back on track.”
The newly-elected congressman attributed his victory to a positive message and style of campaigning.
“I think (my) message resonated with people more than the negative attacks we’ve seen,” Loudermilk said.