The blog.

20
Sep

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for September 20, 2018

Rex Brunswick

Rex is an adult male Great Pyrenees & American Bulldog mix who is available for adoption from The Humane Society of South Coastal Georgia in Brunswick, GA. Rex was evacuated from the Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach just before Hurricane Florence.

Blanche Brunswick

Blanche is a female Pit Bull Terrier mix who is available for adoption from The Humane Society of South Coastal Georgia in Brunswick, GA. Blanche was evacuated from the Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach just before Hurricane Florence.

Kodak Brunswick

Kodak is a young male Labrador Retriever & Pit Bull Terrier mix who is available for adoption from The Humane Society of South Coastal Georgia in Brunswick, GA. Kodak was evacuated from the Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach just before Hurricane Florence.

20
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 20, 2018

On September 20, 1863, the Confederate Army of the Tennessee under General Braxton Bragg repelled Union forces under General William Rosencrans at the Battle of Chickamauga. After Gettysburg, Chickamauga is generally considered the second-bloodiest battle of the Civil War, with 18,500 Confederate casualties and 16,100 Union dead.

The first classes at Oglethorpe University under it’s current non-denominational charter were held on September 20, 1916. Happy 101st Anniversary to the Stormy Petrels. The university was originally affiliated with the Presbyterian Church and located in Midway, Georgia. In 1870, after a period of closure during the Civil War they relocated to the Atlanta area. Currently, a collection of more than 20,000 pieces of political campaign materials is on display at the Weltner Library on Oglethorpe’s campus.

On September 20, 1976, Playboy magazine released an interview with Jimmy Carter, then a candidate for President.

During the 1976 campaigns, a 13-foot tall smiling peanut sculpture was created by the Indiana Democratic Party for Carter’s presidential campaign.

Since 1976, the Jimmy Carter Smiling Peanut has held its position as the world’s second largest peanut, “the most photographed thing in Plains”, and one of the oddest monuments to a politician worldwide. Unfortunately, in 2000, a reckless driver crashed into the peanut, whose wooden hoops, chicken wire, and aluminum foil weren’t enough to keep it upright. After the accident, the peanut was moved from the Plains train depot to the Davis E-Z Shop in Plains, where it remains today. Although the peanut has been kept in pristine form, the fence surrounding it has become dilapidated as a result of over a decade of tourists posing for photos on it.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Western Judicial Circuit Senior Judge David Sweat ordered a December 4 election for State House District 28, comprising parts of Habersham, Banks and Stephens counties, according to AccessWDUN.Continue Reading..

19
Sep

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for September 19, 2018

Brooke Statesboro

Brooke is a young female Greyhound & Whippet mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Humane Society of Statesboro & Bulloch County in Statesboro, GA.

Brooke is a super sweet pup who would love her forever home! She is vet examined and vaccinated to age. She will be spayed soon and ready to go!

Dexter Statesboro

Dexter is a young male Labrador Retriever mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Humane Society of Statesboro & Bulloch County in Statesboro, GA.

Axel Statesboro

Axel is a young Belgian Shepherd/Malinois and Hound mix puppy who is available for adoption from Fixing the Boro in Statesboro, GA.

Axel is an extremely snuggly guy, who is on the quiet side of the spectrum. He will heavily excel in a home with other, outgoing and friendly dogs! His favorite thing in the world is to curl up with his person in bed or on the couch. Axel will do wonderfully in a laid back home, with or without children, and will definitely become a stupendous family dog. He is quite smart, and extremely trusting.

19
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 19, 2018

President George Washington gave his farewell address on September 19, 1796.

The period for a new election of a Citizen, to Administer the Executive government of the United States, being not far distant, and the time actually arrived, when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person, who is to be cloathed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those, out of whom a choice is to be made.

I beg you, at the sametime, to do me the justice to be assured, that this resolution has not been taken, without a strict regard to all the considerations appertaining to the relation, which binds a dutiful Citizen to his country–and that, in withdrawing the tender of service which silence in my Situation might imply, I am influenced by no diminution of zeal for your future interest, no deficiency of grateful respect for your past kindness; but am supported by a full conviction that the step is compatible with both.

On September 19, 1863, the Battle of Chickamauga was joined between the federal Army of the Cumberland under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans and the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Gen. Braxton Bragg.

Thirteen marchers were shot and killed and forty more wounded in Camilla, Georgia at the Camilla Massacre on September 19, 1868 as marchers to a Republican Party rally were gunned down.

President James Garfield died on September 19, 1881, of wounds sustained on July 2d of that year. Garfield is one of seven Presidents born in Ohio – he and William McKinley, were both killed by assassins.

Chickamauga National Battlefield was dedicated September 19, 1895.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Voters in State House District 28 will go to the polls at a yet-undecided date to re-vote in the Republican Primary, according to The Northeast Georgian.Continue Reading..

18
Sep

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for September 18, 2018

Gwinnett County Animal Shelter is hosting 24 refugees evacuated from South Carolina, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post.

Rosie Gwinnett

Rosie is a young female Hound mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

Leo Gwinnett

Leo is a 7-year old male American Bulldog mix who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

Bree Gwinnett

Bree is a female Catahoula Leopard Dog puppy who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

18
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 18, 2018

The Mayflower left Plymouth, England, for the New World on September 16, 1620. Thirty-five of 102 passengers were members of the English Separatist Church seeking religious freedom from the Church of England. Originally aiming to reach Virginia, Mayflower eventually landed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Forty-one delegates signed the United States Constitution, including Abraham Baldwin and William Few representing Georgia, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787 before adjourning sine die. Constitution Day was celebrated yesterday and the National Archives has some great background materials.

The United States government took out its first loan on September 18, 1789, the proceeds of which were used to pay the salaries of the President, and First Congress. On the same day, future President Thomas Jefferson wrote a letter to E. Rutledge in which he requested that a shipment of olive trees be sent via Baltimore.

President George Washington laid the cornerstone of the United States Capitol on September 18, 1793.

We know from that newspaper article, and from Masonic ritual, that Washington placed an inscribed silver plate under the cornerstone at the southeast corner of this building. However, we do not know whether that meant the southeast corner of the Senate wing, the first section of the building to be completed, or the southeast corner of the whole building as intended, which would locate it over on the House side. Two centuries later, the Architect of the Capitol is still searching for that cornerstone. Metal detectors have failed to locate the silver plate.

On September 17, 1796, George Washington began working on the final draft of his farewell address as the first President of the United States of America.

Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” on September 14, 1814.

On September 15, 1831, Dr. Samuel Worcester and Dr. Elizur Butler – missionaries – were tried in a Lawrenceville courtroom for living as white people among the Cherokee and refusing to take an oath of loyalty to Georgia, convicted and sentenced to hard labor. Some historians refer to this case, which went to the United States Supreme Court on appeal, as the beginning of the events that led to the forced removal of the Cherokee people from Georgia on the “Trail of Tears.”

HMS Beagle, carrying Charles Darwin, arrived at the Gallapagos Islands on September 15, 1835.

President Millard Fillmore signed the Fugitive Slave Act on September 18, 1850, requiring that slaves be returned to their owners even if they were in a free state.

The Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee met the Army of the Potomac under General George McClellan at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862.

The Battle of Antietam actually consisted of three battles. Beginning at dawn on September 17, Union General Joseph Hooker’s men stormed Confederate General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s troops around the Dunker Church, the West Woods, and David Miller’s cornfield. The Federals made repeated attacks, but furious Rebel counterattacks kept the Yankees in check. By early afternoon, the fighting moved south to the middle of the battlefield. Union troops under General Edwin Sumner inflicted devastating casualties on the Confederates along a sunken road that became known as “Bloody Lane,” before the Southerners retreated. McClellan refused to apply reserves to exploit the opening in the Confederate center because he believed Lee’s force to be much larger than it actually was. In the late afternoon, Union General Ambrose Burnside attacked General James Longstreet’s troops across a stone bridge that came to bear Burnside’s name. The Yankees crossed the creek, but a Confederate counterattack brought any further advance to a halt.

The fighting ended by early evening, and the two armies remained in place throughout the following day. After dark on September 18, Lee began pulling his troops out of their defenses for a retreat to Virginia. The losses for the one-day battle were staggering. Union casualties included 2,108 dead, 9,540 wounded, and 753 missing, while Confederate casualties numbered 1,546 dead, 7,752 wounded, and 1,108 missing.

General Robert E. Lee retreated from Antietam Creek on September 18, 1862, following the bloodiest day of fighting in the Civil War.

On September 14, 1885, Georgia Governor Henry McDaniel signed legislation granting up to 200 acres in Fulton and DeKalb Counties to the federal government to be used in the constuction of Fort McPherson, which was named after Union Maj. Gen. James McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.

On September 14, 1901, President William McKinley died of an infection from gunshot wounds suffered eight days earlier.

On September 15, 1904, Wilbur Wright made the first in-flight turn in an airplane.

A single pistol shot on September 16, 1920 opened former Cherokee land in Oklahoma to white settlers in a “land run” to claim property.

On September 17, 1932, the Georgia Division of the Roosevelt Business and Professional League was created to work with the Georgia Democratic Party to support FDR’s Presidential campaign in the Peach State.

The original stimulus act was announced to bring $70 million in federal money to Georgia to build roads and public buildings on September 16, 1933.

On September 16, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Selective Service and Training Act requiring males 26-35 years of age to register for the draft. On the same day, Sam Rayburn of Texas was elected Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and would go on to hold the post for 17 years total, the longest tenure of any Speaker.

Early on the morning of September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls.

On September 18, 1973, Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter filed a report claiming that he saw an Unidentified Flying Object in the sky above Leary, Georgia in 1969.

Carter was preparing to give a speech at a Lions Club meeting. At about 7:15 p.m (EST), one of the guests called his attention to a strange object that was visible about 30 degrees above the horizon to the west of where he was standing. Carter described the object as being bright white and as being about as bright as the moon. It was said to have appeared to have closed in on where he was standing but to have stopped beyond a stand of pine trees some distance from him. The object is then said to have changed color, first to blue, then to red, then back to white, before appearing to recede into the distance. Carter felt that the object was self-luminous, but not a solid in nature. Carter’s report indicates that it was witnessed by about ten or twelve other people, and was in view for ten to twelve minutes before it passed out of sight.

Click here to view a copy of the report, allegedly on file at the Carter Center.

https://youtu.be/ohgchUp0wYg

Jimmy Carter received the first ever endorsement of a national ticket by the National Education Association in his bid for President on September 17, 1976.

The Georgia General Assembly approved a new state Constitution on September 18, 1981, which was placed on the 1982 ballot and after approval by voters, went into effect in 1983.

On September 18, 1990, Atlanta was announced as the location for the 1996 Summer Olympic games.

Ted Turner announced on September 18, 1997 his intent to donate $1 billion to the United Nations.

On September 15, 1996, the Texas Rangers retired #34 in honor of the most dominant pitcher in professional baseball history, Nolan Ryan.

R.E.M. and Gregg Allman were among the inductees into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame on September 16, 2006.

The Georgia Historical Society displayed the hand-written draft of the United States Constitution used by Georgia signer Abraham Baldwin, according to the Savannah Morning News.

Monday marked the 231st anniversary of the adoption of the United States Constitution, and Georgia Historical Society displayed Abraham Baldwin’s draft copy of the document to celebrate.

Baldwin’s draft is one of 13 surviving copies of the document and includes the handwritten margin notes made by Baldwin during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.

Along with the draft, the tables on the first floor of the building displayed other items from the Revolutionary era, including a drum that was used in Revolutionary War battles and the dueling pistols used by Button Gwinnett and Lachlan McIntosh.

The draft has been in the GHS collection since the 19th century, but to this day, nobody knows how it got here.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

United States District Court Judge Amy Totenberg did not order the use of paper ballots for Georgia’s November elections, according to the Augusta Chronicle.

A federal judge ruled late Monday that forcing Georgia to scrap its electronic voting machines in favor of paper ballots for the upcoming midterm elections is too risky, though she said she has grave concerns about the machines that experts have said are vulnerable to hacking.

U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg’s ruling means the state won’t have to use paper ballots for this year’s midterm elections, including a high-profile gubernatorial contest between the state’s top elections official, Republican Secretary of State Brian Kemp, and Democrat Stacey Abrams, a former state House minority leader who’s trying to become the country’s first black, female governor.

State elections director Chris Harvey testified at a hearing last week that the state doesn’t have enough optical scanners to handle such an increase in the volume of paper ballots and likely can’t secure enough in time. It would also be tough to get enough ballots and to conduct necessary election worker training and voter education, he testified.

But paper-ballot elections are easier, and costs would be offset by huge savings because election officials wouldn’t have to test, program, transport, set up, take down and secure the state’s 27,000 voting machines and account for all the memory cards, lawyers for the [plaintiffs] argued.

From the AJC:

Her 46-page order Monday said she was concerned about “voter frustration and disaffection from the voting process” if she had prohibited electronic voting machines just weeks before the election.

“There is nothing like bureaucratic confusion and long lines to sour a citizen,” Totenberg wrote.

Following State Rep. Christian Coomer‘s nomination to the Georgia Court of Appeals, his father, Ken Coomer will seek to keep the seat in the family, according to the Rome News-Tribune.

The father of state Rep. Christian Coomer has filed paperwork to seek his son’s District 14 seat — and he comes with endorsements and cash from top Republican leaders in the House.

“After a lifetime of service to others as a United States Marine, pastor and counselor and local leader, I am no stranger to getting the job done for my community,” Ken Coomer said in a press release.

The 14th District covers the southeast quadrant of Floyd and northern half of Bartow County.

A special election will be called to fill Christian Coomer’s seat and there will be an open qualifying period, but the dates have not yet been set, according to Candice Broce, press secretary for the Georgia Secretary of State.

The Port of Savannah chalked another record month, which will increase as rail access to the port is built out, according to the Savannah Morning News.

Containers moved in August in Savannah grew 8 percent over the same month in 2017.

For the fiscal year of 2018, that ended on June 30, the ports handled 4.2 million TEUs and 8.4 percent over fiscal year 2017.

“A strengthening economy and a greater reliance on GPA in major inland markets is driving growth at the Port of Savannah,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “We expect this trend to continue as more customers take advantage of Garden City Terminal’s central location and efficient terminal operations.”

GPA board members approved $92 million for the [Mason Mega-Rail] project at Monday’s board of directors meeting held in Atlanta. The project will double Savannah’s annual rail capacity to 1 million containers and will be the largest on-terminal rail facility in North America by 2020, port officials said.

The Mega Rail expansion is funded in part by a $44 million U.S. Department of Transportation FASTLANE grant administered by the Maritime Administration. The GPA board approved $42.2 million for the project last year. Almost $100 million has been allocated for the project.

GPA estimates the new terminal will take more than 200,000 trucks off the road annually. The rail project will extend the port’s reach along an arc of cities, ranging from Memphis to St. Louis, Chicago and Cincinnati.

The United States House of Representatives adopted a compromise budget that includes funding for the ports at Brunswick and Savannah, according to The Brunswick News.

“The ports of Brunswick and Savannah are critical economic drivers for our area, state and nation and they need adequate federal support,” U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, R-1, said in a statement.

The 2019 fiscal year budget for the Army Corps of Engineers delineates a total of $5,258,000 for Brunswick, with more than $4.3 million earmarked for dredging activities, $777,000 for operations and $177,000 for area maintenance. The plan is for the removal of 30 percent of the sediment presently residing in the bar channel.

It passed the House by a vote of 377-20 after passing the Senate by a vote of 92-5 on Wednesday.

Both chambers approved earlier versions of the legislation in June, but didn’t work out the differences in the bills passed until the conference committee met last week.

Gwinnett County Public Schools is dealing with growth issues, as the state’s largest public school system is projected to continue growing enrollment, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post.

As the largest school system in Georgia and continuously growing, Gwinnett’s school system focuses on ensuring issues such as overcrowding don’t take away from instructional learning.

It’s a balancing act that will continue with the county, already estimated to have more than 900,000 residents and expected to add another 600,000 residents by 2040.

As part of a referendum that will be voted on in November, the school board included the construction of a new cluster high school in the Mill Creek area as part of a projects list for a $350 million general obligation bond.

“We knew the Mill Creek growth is ongoing and are looking at the long-range expectations,” Flynt said. “It’s problematic to do an exact forecast for an individual school, but rather we do long-range projections for school clusters and age ranges.”

Muscogee County Board of Education members rejected a proposal to recruit more bus drivers and asked the administration to prepare a recommendation, according to the Ledger-Enquirer.

The proposal came from representatives John Thomas of District 2 and Frank Myers of District 8, the nine-member board’s most outspoken critics of the administration. They want the Muscogee County School District to raise the minimum pay for bus drivers to $17 per hour. That’s an increase of 16 percent from the current rate of $14.66 per hour.

“Thereafter, every bus driver employee shall be rewarded with a $1 raise per year for each year he or she serves the district,” the proposal says.

After a 70-minute discussion at last week’s work session and nearly another hour of debate at Monday night’s meeting, the proposal failed in a 2-6-1 vote. Myers and Thomas were the lone yes votes. Vanessa Jackson of District 3 abstained.

Myers vowed to bring back the proposal, or a tweaked version of it based on board member comments, for another vote next month.

[Board Member Pat Hugley] Green emphasized the administration’s proposal should also include “every other employment category.”

The Bulloch County Board of Education hired a new director of school safety, according to the Statesboro Herald.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee upgraded its participation in Carolyn Bordeaux’s challenge to Congressman Rob Woodall, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post.

Bourdeaux is now part of the DCCC’s Red to Blue Program, which focuses on supporting candidates who the committee feels have a high chance of flipping Republican-held seats in Congress in November.

“A teacher and public servant, Carolyn Bourdeaux has never sat on the sidelines in the face of a problem, and now is no different,” DCCC Chairman Ben Ray Lujan said in a statement. “It is clear that Carolyn has put together a strong, people-driven campaign, and her impressive finish in the competitive primary showed she has what it takes to give the people of Georgia’s 7th Congressional District a real voice in Congress.”

By virtue of being added to the program, Bourdeaux will receive organizational and fundraising assistance from the DCCC. Staff resources, candidate training and strategic guidance will also be offered to Bourdeaux’s camp, according to her campaign.

Savannah will hold public meetings for input on the 2019 budget, according to the Savannah Morning News.

The city is partnering with Open Savannah to give residents a chance next month to offer feedback on how their tax dollars should be spent before the Savannah City Council begins its 2019 budget deliberations.

The day-long event at the Savannah Civic Center on Oct. 20 will also give city staff an opportunity to inform the community about the limitations — financially and otherwise — they face in developing the city’s annual spending plan, said Melissa Carter, Office of Management and Budget director.

Open Savannah is also planning to launch a game-based smartphone app in the next couple of weeks that will simulate the city budget and allow users to determine their spending priorities.

17
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 17, 2018

Forty-one delegates signed the United States Constitution, including Abraham Baldwin and William Few representing Georgia, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787 before adjourning sine die.

On September 17, 1796, George Washington began working on the final draft of his farewell address as the first President of the United States of America.

The Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee met the Army of the Potomac under General George McClellan at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862.

The Battle of Antietam actually consisted of three battles. Beginning at dawn on September 17, Union General Joseph Hooker’s men stormed Confederate General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s troops around the Dunker Church, the West Woods, and David Miller’s cornfield. The Federals made repeated attacks, but furious Rebel counterattacks kept the Yankees in check. By early afternoon, the fighting moved south to the middle of the battlefield. Union troops under General Edwin Sumner inflicted devastating casualties on the Confederates along a sunken road that became known as “Bloody Lane,” before the Southerners retreated. McClellan refused to apply reserves to exploit the opening in the Confederate center because he believed Lee’s force to be much larger than it actually was. In the late afternoon, Union General Ambrose Burnside attacked General James Longstreet’s troops across a stone bridge that came to bear Burnside’s name. The Yankees crossed the creek, but a Confederate counterattack brought any further advance to a halt.

The fighting ended by early evening, and the two armies remained in place throughout the following day. After dark on September 18, Lee began pulling his troops out of their defenses for a retreat to Virginia. The losses for the one-day battle were staggering. Union casualties included 2,108 dead, 9,540 wounded, and 753 missing, while Confederate casualties numbered 1,546 dead, 7,752 wounded, and 1,108 missing.

On September 17, 1932, the Georgia Division of the Roosevelt Business and Professional League was created to work with the Georgia Democratic Party to support FDR’s Presidential campaign in the Peach State.

Jimmy Carter received the first ever endorsement of a national ticket by the National Education Association in his bid for President on September 17, 1976.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Nathan Deal completed another set of domino appointments, appointing Georgia Court of Appeals Judge Charlie Bethel to the Georgia Supreme Court, and State Rep. Christian Coomer (R-Cartersville) to fill the Court of Appeals vacancy created by Bethel’s elevation.

Charlie Bethel, Supreme Court of Georgia
Bethel currently serves as a Judge on the Court of Appeals of Georgia. He previously represented the 54th district in the Georgia State Senate and served as an alderman for the City of Dalton. Bethel has experience in dispute resolution, as the director of corporate affairs for J&J Industries and as a legal clerk for Judge Charles A. Pannell Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. He is a graduate of Leadership Georgia and was named to Georgia Trend’s “100 Most Influential Georgians” list three times. Bethel earned a bachelor’s degree in Management, cum laude, from the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia and a law degree from the University of Georgia School of Law. He and his wife, Lynsey, have three children and reside in Dalton.

Rep. Christian A. Coomer, Court of Appeals of Georgia
Coomer represents the 14th district in the Georgia House of Representatives, where he currently serves as the majority whip. He is a solo practitioner with Christian A. Coomer, Attorney at Law, LLC. Coomer is also a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and serves as a part-time Air Force Judge Advocate currently assigned to the Joint Force Headquarters of the Georgia National Guard. He was appointed to the Court Reform Council by Deal and was named the Georgia Chamber of Commerce’s Legislator of the Year in 2017. Coomer received numerous awards for his military service including the U.S. Air Force Meritorious Service Medal. He is a graduate of Air Command and Staff College at Air University and the Georgia Legislative Leadership Institute. Coomer is a member of the Cartersville-Bartow County Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Veterans Association. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Lee University and a law degree from the University of Georgia School of Law. Coomer and his wife, Heidi, have three children and reside in Cartersville.

Governor Deal joined Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and Speaker David Ralston in naming appointees to the Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority (The ATL).

Deal appointed Charlie Sutlive to serve as the board chairman, effective immediately. Cagle appointed Teddy Russell and Mark Toro, effective immediately. Ralston appointed Charlotte J. Nash, effective immediately, and Rep. Earl Ehrhart, effective upon the conclusion of his service in the Georgia General Assembly in January 2019.

“Georgia is a destination for all types of industries and people from all walks of life to come and enjoy the prosperity of our state,” said Deal. “By 2040, the metro Atlanta area is projected to add another 2.5 million residents and the ATL is a significant step towards providing a coordinated, streamlined and unified approach to prepare for the future of metro Atlanta and the surrounding communities. The ATL board members will work to ensure that our modes of transit and mobility are worthy of the No. 1 state for business and I look forward to their work to provide new options for Georgians to get to jobs, community activities and homes to spend time with family more quickly and efficiently.”

The ATL was established by HB 930 to provide structure for coordinated transit planning and funding for the 13-county metro Atlanta region. The ATL is responsible for developing a Regional Transit Plan, as well as identifying and prioritizing the projects and initiatives required to develop region-wide transit.

“As our state continues to experience record levels of growth, the ATL will strategically expand our public transportation network to accommodate thousands of new passengers, while reducing traffic congestion, strengthening the link between our communities, and spurring future economic growth,” said Cagle. “I commend Chairmen Brandon Beach and Kevin Tanner for their dedicated commitment to advancing this historic legislation, and I’m confident the ATL’s board members will take full advantage of our state’s many strategic assets to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of future investments in building a world-class transit network.”

The ATL is governed by a 16-member board and attached to the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority for shared administrative resources.

“Transit is an integral part of our efforts to reduce traffic congestion, improve freight logistics and create more jobs by attracting more businesses to metropolitan Atlanta,” said Ralston. “I am confident that the members of the ATL Board will look for ways to improve our transit network through innovative partnerships and projects, and that they will work tirelessly to keep Atlanta and its surrounding communities on the move.”

Charlie Sutlive, Chairman, The Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority, appointed by Deal
Sutlive is the director of corporate communication at Georgia Power. In this role, he provides strategic support for the company’s external and internal communications. Sutlive was previously the vice chancellor for communications and governmental affairs for the University System of Georgia (USG) and led the development and execution of communications, public affairs and economic development plans for USG’s 26 colleges and universities. He has held multiple leadership positions for some of the largest and most recognizable companies in the world, including MCI, which is now part of Verizon Communications, McKesson and Coca-Cola North America. Sutlive sat on the boards of Leadership Georgia, the REACH Georgia Foundation, the Jekyll Island Foundation and the Smithgall Woods Foundation. He is also a graduate of Leadership Georgia. Sutlive earned a bachelor’s degree in Public Relations from the University of Georgia.

Teddy Russell, The Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority, appointed by Cagle
Russell is a co-owner and the president of Russell Landscape. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. Russell and his wife, Courtney, have three children and reside in Atlanta.

Mark Toro, The Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority, appointed by Cagle
Toro is a co-founder of North American Properties’ Atlanta office. He previously served in several leadership positions with Faison and Cousins Properties. Toro has acquired, developed or redeveloped more than 70 projects totaling almost 30 million square feet. He attended Rutgers University. Toro and his wife, Nancy, have two children and three grandchildren.

Charlotte J. Nash, The Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority, appointed by Ralston
Nash is the chair of the Gwinnett County Board of Commissioners. She was elected countywide to this position in March 2011 and was reelected in 2012 and 2016.  Nash previously worked for the Gwinnett County government for 28 years and retired as the county manager in 2004. She sits on the Atlanta Regional Commission Board and chairs the Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District Board. Nash is a former president of the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia. She and her husband, Michael, have two children and two grandchildren. They reside in Dacula.

Rep. Earl Ehrhart, The Atlanta-region Transit Link Authority, appointed by Ralston
Ehrhart is the CEO of Taylor English Decisions. He was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1988 and will conclude his service as a member of the General Assembly in January 2019. As a member of the House, Ehrhart served as the Minority Whip, Chairman of the Rules Committee and Chairman of Higher Education Appropriations Committee. A businessman and entrepreneur, he was previously the executive vice president of the Facility Group and CEO of LakePoint Sports Development Group. Ehrhart and his wife, Ginny McCormack Ehrhart, have six children between them.

Dalton voters will decide in a November referendum whether to extend the hours of alcohol service on Sundays, according to the Daily Citizen News.

“It’s a no-brainer. I think the voters are going to approve it,” said T.J. Kaikobad, owner of Cyra’s in downtown Dalton.

Kaikobad says moving the time ahead for alcohol sales on Sunday will have a small but real impact on Dalton restaurants.

“From what I’ve seen over the years, over every 20 guests, you might have one who’ll order a bloody Mary at 11. And we have to so ‘No, you have to wait,’” he said.

Still, Kaikobad says it will help restaurants be able to better serve those customers.

Some Dalton residents say they are likely to vote for the measure.

“We’ve had Sunday sales for 10 years or so, and I haven’t noticed any big problems,” said Mark Greene. “I don’t see why moving the start time up will hurt.”

 

 

Coweta County’s Joint Transportation Coordinating Committee recommended the county and municipalities move forward with a Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax for Transportation (T-SPLOST) on the November 2019 ballot, according to the Newnan Times-Herald.

At its July meeting, the committee voted unanimously to recommend that Coweta County and its cities pursue the TSPLOST, a 1-percent, five-year sales tax to fund various transportation projects. The Coweta County Board of Commissioners voted Aug. 21 to move forward.

The TSPLOST would likely bring in around $100 million over five years, said Coweta County Administrator Michael Fouts. He based that estimate on the projections for the 2019 SPLOST, which is projected to bring in $140 million. A SPLOST runs for six years, instead of the five years of TSPLOST, and there are some items that are exempt from TSPLOST taxes – most notably, motor fuel.

Brooklet City Council will hold its third hearing on the proposed FY 2019 property tax millage rate, according to the Statesboro Herald.

Brooklet City Administrator Angela Wirth said the hearings are to allow citizens to comment on the city’s millage rate, which will not change, but remain at 7.696.

The millage rate will not change, but since the city’s property value assessments have risen, by law the city must hold the hearings, she said.

Dredging near the entrance to St Simons Island was greenlighted by the Georgia Coastal Marshlands Protection Committee, according to The Brunswick Times.

Leonard Gomez, Republican candidate for House District 132 responded to his opponent’s complaint that Gomez allegedly no longer lives in the district, according to the Newnan Times-Herald.

In his declaration of candidacy for the Georgia House 132 seat, Gomez lists his address as 1 Main St., Apt. 2, Grantville. That was filed on March 8, according to documents included in Trammell’s challenge. In his financial disclosure, filed March 19, Gomez listed his long-time Grantville address.

According to Coweta tax records, the Gomezes sold that home on March 22. The home Mrs. Gomez owns is located in House District 70.

In his challenge, Trammell states that the apartment at 1 Main St. is uninhabited and that the utilities had not been connected as of Sept. 1.

Gomez said they decided not to move to Newnan but to stay in Grantville, and he lives in an apartment on Main Street. Mrs. Gomez bought a house in Newnan in late 2017, but that home was bought as an investment, not for them to live in, Gomez said.

Gomez said his voter registration and driver’s license list his address as Grantville.

14
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 14, 2018

The Mayflower left Plymouth, England, for the New World on September 16, 1620. Thirty-five of 102 passengers were members of the English Separatist Church seeking religious freedom from the Church of England. Originally aiming to reach Virginia, Mayflower eventually landed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” on September 14, 1814.

On September 15, 1831, Dr. Samuel Worcester and Dr. Elizur Butler – missionaries – were tried in a Lawrenceville courtroom for living as white people among the Cherokee and refusing to take an oath of loyalty to Georgia, convicted and sentenced to hard labor. Some historians refer to this case, which went to the United States Supreme Court on appeal, as the beginning of the events that led to the forced removal of the Cherokee people from Georgia on the “Trail of Tears.”

HMS Beagle, carrying Charles Darwin, arrived at the Gallapagos Islands on September 15, 1835.

On September 14, 1885, Georgia Governor Henry McDaniel signed legislation granting up to 200 acres in Fulton and DeKalb Counties to the federal government to be used in the constuction of Fort McPherson, which was named after Union Maj. Gen. James McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.

On September 14, 1901, President William McKinley died of an infection from gunshot wounds suffered eight days earlier.

On September 15, 1904, Wilbur Wright made the first in-flight turn in an airplane.

A single pistol shot on September 16, 1920 opened former Cherokee land in Oklahoma to white settlers in a “land run” to claim property.

The original stimulus act was announced to bring $70 million in federal money to Georgia to build roads and public buildings on September 16, 1933.

On September 16, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Selective Service and Training Act requiring males 26-35 years of age to register for the draft. On the same day, Sam Rayburn of Texas was elected Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and would go on to hold the post for 17 years total, the longest tenure of any Speaker.

Early on the morning of September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls.

On September 15, 1996, the Texas Rangers retired #34 in honor of the most dominant pitcher in professional baseball history, Nolan Ryan.

R.E.M. and Gregg Allman were among the inductees into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame on September 16, 2006.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

 

 

14
Sep

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for September 14, 2018

Lifeline Free

LifeLine Animal Project is offering free adoptions of all animals at its Fulton County and DeKalb County shelters all month.

Maryann Fulton

Maryann is a young female mixed breed puppy who is available for adoption from Lifeline Fulton County Animal Services in Atlanta, GA.

Kate Fulton

Kate is a small to medium-sized female mixed breed dog who is available for adoption from Lifeline Fulton County Animal Services in Atlanta, GA.

Harvey Fulton

Harvey is an adult male Golden Retriever who is available for adoption from Lifeline Fulton County Animal Services in Atlanta, GA.

Devito Fulton

Devito is a wonderfully ridiculous-looking dog who is available for adoption from Lifeline Fulton County Animal Services in Atlanta, GA.

13
Sep

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for September 13, 2018

Some Georgia organizations are assisting refugees and evacuees from Florence, according to The Brunswick News.

Virginia Schlegel, executive director of the Coastal Georgia Humane Society, said its South Carolina counterpart was looking for places to take its animals to get them out of the path of Hurricane Florence.

Humane Society staff and volunteers rented a vehicle to go with the one it already has and took off to Myrtle Beach at 4 a.m. Tuesday. They came back with the load of pets at around 5 p.m. that evening.

The “refugee” pets will be available for adoption in one to two weeks, said Sharon Mathews, animal care specialist for the Humane Society.

Lynn Heth, Humane Society shelter director, said they were so thankful for all the help they’d gotten during Hurricane Irma that they wanted to help other shelters out. The Coastal Georgia Humane Society currently has around 65 dogs and 76 cats total, though some are in foster homes, she said.

Killiam CPR

Killiam is a young male Shar Pei mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

Tulip CPR

Tulip is a young female Treeing Walker Coonhound and Beagle mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

Elise CPR

Elise is a young female Sherpherd mix puppy who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.