The blog.

4
Feb

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for February 4, 2019

Theresa Glynn

Theresa is a female Pit Bull (looks more like a Hound to me) who is available for adoption from Glynn County Animal Services in Brunswick, GA.

Ollie Brunswick

Ollie is an adult male Labrador Retriever mix puppy who is available for adoption from Glynn County Animal Services in Brunswick, GA.

Tucker Brunswick

Tucker is a male Labrador Retrieve mix puppy who is available for adoption from Glynn County Animal Services in Brunswick, GA.

Glynn County Animal Control will begin allowing dogs to be taken on field trips, according to The Brunswick News.

Upon completing certain requirements, residents can volunteers to “sign out” animals with them for a few hours or a few days, said Animal Control Manager Tiffani Hill. Whether taking them to the beach, on a morning jog or afternoon walk, Hill said the opportunity is healthy for both parties.

“We have been kind of beta testing it for the past six months, but it’s only been one dog here or there and only staff members doing it,” Hill said. “For years, other shelters around the country have been successful having programs like this.”

The first step is completing animal control’s volunteer training course.

“They come through our new volunteer training, and fill out our foster paperwork — it’s considered a foster opportunity. They have to fill out the paperwork, and then they can start checking dogs out,” Hill said.

The program has actually helped boost adoptions. Animal control requires volunteers to walk the dogs with special collars and leashes to indicate they are shelter pets up for adoption, she said, which attracts potential adopters.

“We’ve already had four adopted just from them being out in the community,” Hill said. ”We’ve had two success adopts for dogs who have gone to the Pack Canine Studio on the island … They check out dogs to take to their facility, and they’ve helped us place two dogs.”

4
Feb

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for February 4, 2019

On February 4, 1789, George Washington was unanimously elected by the Electoral College as the first President of the United States; Washington’s runner-up John Adams served as Vice President. Washington would repeat the feat four years later on February 4, 1793.

On February 4, 1801, John Marshall took office as Chief Justice of the United States. Marshall continued to hold the post of Secretary of State until March 4th. In one of American history’s rich ironies, Marshall, who served at the same time in the judicial and legislative branches of the federal government, would write the Court’s opinion in Marbury v. Madison, establishing the supremacy of the Supreme Court in matters of applying the Constitution through judicial review and establishing the doctrine of separation of powers. Marshall would serve during the terms of six Presidents.

On February 4, 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress convened in Montgomery, Alabama, where it would draft a Constitution for the Confederate States of America, beginning with a near-verbatim copy of the United States Constitution.

On February 4, 1976, the Georgia Senate approved a resolution previously passed by the State House proposing a Constitutional Amendment to allow Governors of Georgia to serve two consecutive terms and voters approved in November 1976. Then-Governor George Busbee won reelection in November 1978, and since then Democrat Roy Barnes is the only Georgia Governor to not win reelection.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Georgia State House District 28 voters will head to the polls yet again, according to the AJC.Continue Reading..

1
Feb

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for February 1, 2019

Einstein Clarkesville

Einstein is a young male Labrador Retriever who is available for adoption from the Habersham County Animal Shelter in Clarkesville, GA.

Hope Clarkesville

Hope is a female Pointer mix who is available for adoption from the Habersham County Animal Shelter in Clarkesville, GA.

Dexter Clarkesville

Dexter is a young male Treeing Walker Coonhound mix who is available for adoption from the Habersham County Animal Shelter in Clarkesville, GA.

1
Feb

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for February 1, 2019

Georgia’s first colonists landed at Yamacraw Bluff on February 1, 1733.

The United States Supreme Court held its first session in New York City, Chief Justice John Jay presiding, on February 1, 1790.

The first recorded reference to Groundhog Day was in 1841; the first Punxsutawney observance was in 1870.

The first recorded reference to Groundhog Day was in 1841; the first Punxsutawney observance was in 1870.

Atlanta City Council met for the first time on February 2, 1848.

On February 1, 1861, Texas seceded from the Union.

On February 2, 1870, the Georgia General Assembly ratified the 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which states, “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” On February 3, 1870, the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, prohibiting racial discrimination in voting.

On February 1, 1871, Jefferson Franklin Long of Macon, Georgia became the first black Member of Congress to speak on the floor of the United States House of Representatives. Long was born into slavery and taught himself to read and write. Long was a prominent member of the Republican Party, speaking on its behalf in Georgia and other Southern states. He helped elect 37 African-American members to the 1867 Georgia Constitutional Convention and 32 members of the state legislature; Long continued after his term in Congress as a delegate to Republican National Conventions through 1880. In 1880, Long’s support of Governor Alfred Colquitt showed that African-Americans could be an electoral force in Georgia politics.

On February 3, 1887, Congress adopted the Electoral Count Act to clarify how Congress was to count electoral votes.

Electoral vote counting is the oldest activity of the national government and among the oldest questions of constitutional law. It was Congress’s first task when a quorum appeared in the nation’s new legislature on April 6, 1789. It has happened every four years since then. Yet, electoral vote counting remains one of the least understood aspects of our constitutional order.

The Electoral Count Act of 1887 (ECA) lies at the heart of this confusion. In enacting the ECA, Congress drew on lessons learned from its twenty-five previous electoral counts; it sorted through innumerable proposals floated before and after the disastrous presidential election of 1876; and it thrashed out the ECA’s specific provisions over fourteen years of sustained debate. Still, the law invites misinterpretation. The ECA is turgid and repetitious. Its central provisions seem contradictory. Many of its substantive rules are set out in a single sentence that is 275 words long. Proponents of the law admitted it was “not perfect.” Contemporary commentators were less charitable. John Burgess, a leading political scientist in the late nineteenth century, pronounced the law unwise, incomplete, premised on contradictory principles, and expressed in language that was “very confused, almost unintelligible.” At least he thought the law was constitutional; others did not.

Over the nearly 120 years since the ECA’s adoption, the criticisms faded, only to be renewed whenever there was a close presidential election. Our ability to misunderstand the ECA has grown over time. During the 2000 presidential election dispute, politicians, lawyers, commentators, and Supreme Court justices seemed prone to misstate or misinterpret the provisions of the law, even those provisions which were clear to the generation that wrote them. The Supreme Court, for example, mistakenly believed that the Supreme Court of Florida’s erroneous construction of its election code would deny Florida’s electors the ECA’s “safe harbor” protection; Florida Governor Jeb Bush’s hasty submission of his state’s Certificate of Ascertainment was untimely under the Act; and Democratic members of Congress framed their objections to accepting Florida’s electoral vote on the wrong grounds. Even Al Gore, the presidential candidate contesting the election’s outcome, misread the federal deadline for seating Florida’s electors.

Only the United States Congress could so obfuscate a matter as seemingly simple as counting that its Act remained undecipherable for more than one hundred years.

The Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified by Delaware on February 3, 1913, giving the Amendment the requisite Constitutional supermajority of three-fourths of the states. The text of the Amendment reads, in its entirety,

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration.

President Woodrow Wilson died on February 3, 1924 in Washington, DC. Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia (pronounced Stan-ton) and spent most of his youth to age 14 in Augusta, Georgia. Wilson started practicing law in Atlanta, Georgia in 1882, leaving the next year to pursue a Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University. His wife, Ellen Louise Axson, was from Savannah, and they married in Rome, Ga in 1885.

On February 2, 1932, Al Capone was sent to federal prison in Atlanta.

On February 3, 1959, a chartered Beechcraft Bonanza carrying Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson crashed near Mason City, Iowa, killing all aboard.

On February 1, 1965, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. arrived in Selma, Alabama, where he was arrested.

Jimi Hendrix recorded Purple Haze on February 3, 1967.

Richard M. Nixon announced his candidacy for President of the United States on Feburary 1, 1968.

On February 2, 1988, the Georgia Senate ratified the 22d Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provides that pay raises for Members of Congress shall not go into effect until the next term.

On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia exploded while re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Brian P. Kemp appointed a committee to investigate allegations against McIntosh County Superior Court Clerk Rebecca McFerrin.

Election officials who oversaw the Republican primary and resulting special election in House District 28 were questioned in a lawsuit by former State Rep. Dan Gasaway, according to AccessWDUN.Continue Reading..

31
Jan

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for January 31, 2019

Rollo One Love

Rollo is a young male mixed breed puppy who will be available for adoption beginning February 9, 2019 from One Love Animal Rescue, Inc in Savannah, GA.

Bjorn One Love

Bjorn Ironside is a young male mixed breed puppy who will be available for adoption beginning February 9, 2019 from One Love Animal Rescue, Inc in Savannah, GA.

Ivar One Love

Ivar the Boneless is a young male mixed breed puppy who will be available for adoption beginning February 9, 2019 from One Love Animal Rescue, Inc in Savannah, GA.

31
Jan

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for January 31, 2019

On January 31, 1733, six boats carried Georgia’s first colonists to Trench’s Island, now called Hilton Head Island, where they spent the night before continuing on to land in Georgia at Yamacraw Bluff on February 1, 1733.

On January 31, 1865, Robert E. Lee began service as Commander-in-Chief of the Confederate armies.

On January 31, 1865, Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, outlawing slavery.

General William Tecumseh Sherman visited Kimball Opera House in Atlanta on January 31, 1879, which was then serving as State Capitol, fifteen years after burning the city.

On January 31, 1893, the trademark for “Coca-Cola” was filed.

Atlanta Braves pitcher John Rocker was suspended on January 31, 2000 for remarks made to ESPN.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Homeland Security officials said 33 people have been arrested in association with human trafficking ahead of Atlanta’s Super Bowl, according to 11Alive.Continue Reading..

30
Jan

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for January 30, 2019

What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.

Ecclesiastes 1:9 (NIV)

Today’s historical moments below combine to show some of the major influences on Georgia politics and governance since her founding, and how the same conflicts have played out across the world, from Northern Ireland to India, to stages of rock and roll shows.

On January 30, 1788, the Georgia legislature passed a resolution calling for a state Constitutional Convention in Augusta to adopt a state Constitution that conformed to the new Constitution of the United States.

On January 30, 1862, the United States launced its first ironclad warship, USS Monitor.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30, 1882 in Hyde Park, New York. In 1942, Roosevelt ordered Japanese-Americans on the west coast of the United States into concentration camps, leaving German and Italian Americans free.

On January 30, 1935, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr. protested segregated elevators at the Fulton County Courthouse.

On January 30, 1948, Mohandas K. Gandhi was assassinated.

1920 Georgia Flag

On January 30, 1956, six members of the Georgia State House of Representatives introduced House Bill 98 to replace the red and white stripes on Georgia’s flag (above) with a Confederate battle flag (below). That same day, a bomb was thrown at the Birmingham, AL home of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

1956 Georgia Flag

January 30, 1972 is remembered as Bloody Sunday in commemoration of the shooting of 26 civilians by British troops in Northern Ireland.

On January 30, 2001, the Georgia State Senate passed a house bill changing the state flag from the 1956 version to one that aggregated the State Seal and five former state flags, pictured below.

2001GeorgiaFlag

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Continue Reading..

29
Jan

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for January 29, 2019

Charlie Husky

Charlie is an adult male Husky who is available for adoption from BullyWag, Inc. in Peachtree City, GA. He prefers dogs smaller than himself. He is a talker. Good with kids. He likes men who like him and give him lots of affection.

Belle Husky

Belle is a young female Husky mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Fayette County Animal Shelter in Peachtree City, GA.

Jasper Husky

Jasper is a young male Husky mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Fayette County Animal Shelter in Peachtree City, GA.

29
Jan

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for January 29, 2019

On January 29, 1779, British forces captured Augusta, Georgia.

Walter F George Vienna Georgia

Walter F. George was born on January 29, 1878 in Preston, the county seat for Webster County, Georgia. Ron Daniels has a brief bio of the United States Senator who gave his name to a Law School, a courthouse, and a lake. The photo above is a bust in the town square of Vienna, Georgia, in Dooly County, where George made his home.

On January 29, 1892, the Coca Cola Company was incorporated in Georgia in Fulton County Superior Court.

On January 29, 1955, Georgia Governor Marvin Griffin signed legislation granting the power to take land needed for the Stone Mountain Park through condemnation if negotiations to buy it fell through.

On January 29, 1977, Congressman Andrew Young resigned his seat to accept the nomination by President Carter as United States Ambassador to the United Nations.

On January 29, 1998, a bomb exploded in a Birmingham, Alabama abortion clinic, killing a police officer. Eric Rudolph would later admit to setting that bomb, along with the Centennial Park bombing in 1996, and the bombing of a Sandy Springs abortion clinic and an Atlanta bar in 1997.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

 All Georgia Senate Committee meetings are canceled today.Continue Reading..

28
Jan

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for January 28, 2019

Connie Moultrie

Connie is a young female Pointer mix puppy who is available for adoption from the Moultrie-Colquitt County Humane Society in Moultrie, GA.

Abbie Moultrie

Abbie is a young female Boykin Spaniel mix who is available for adoption from the Moultrie-Colquitt County Humane Society in Moultrie, GA.

Lily Moultrie

Lily is a young female Black Mouth Cur mix who is available for adoption from the Moultrie-Colquitt County Humane Society in Moultrie, GA.

The Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office is partnering to provide service dogs for veterans, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post.

thanks to a partnership between Rashad’s Top Dogg K9 and the Gwinnett County Jail, the nonprofit is helping yet another segment of the population: inmates.

Coordinated through the jail’s Operation Second Chance, or more colloquially known, the Jail Dogs program, Rashad teaches inmates the basics of service dog training, building on what they have already learned through Operation Second Chance.

Since its inception in 2010, the Jail Dogs program — a partnership between the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office and Society of Humane Friends of Georgia that saves dogs from the county’s animal shelter by using inmates to train the animals until they are adoptable — has successfully adopted out more than 400 dogs.

Rashad is hoping that now some of those dogs will go to veterans.

“We’ve been getting dogs from many different places — breeders or shelters, most of our dogs are rescues, whether they’re pure-bred or not,” Rashad said. “About 40 to 50 percent of the dogs that come in can actually do this (service) work, though, so one of the big challenges was getting enough dogs for the veterans. It’s not uncommon to have 600, 700 people on our (wait) list.”