Category: Georgia Politics

22
Jul

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for July 22, 2021

Line is a young male Labrador Retriever mix puppy who is available for adoption from Furever After Rescue in Macon, GA.

Hi! I’m Line. I’m a 9 week old Lab mix, from the Let’s Go Fishing litter. I am a happy boy who loves cuddling. My foster dad says that I am a “good, solid pup that you follow you anywhere,” and I will! I’m happy following my people, my brothers and sisters, and any of my foster siblings. One of my favorite activities is going for walks and play time in the yard or out in the woods with my family – the big dogs, a couple of goats, and puppies from other litters. I don’t care if they’re bigger or smaller than me, I have a great time with my friends.

Sinker is a young male Labrador Retriever mix puppy who is available for adoption from Furever After Rescue in Macon, GA.

Hi, it’s me – Sinker, one of the boys from the Let’s Go Fishing Litter. I’m looking for my furever family. Don’t get me wrong- I love my foster family- they’re super duper. But each night, I go to sleep and dream of what my foster mom calls my Furever Family. She says they will play with me (I love to play), and snuggle with me (I REALLY love to snuggle) , and they will love me forever and ever. My foster mom says I’m a great catch! I love other dogs, I love to play with toys, and I love to be with people. I have this big heart full of sunshine that I just want to share. Can I share it with you?

Gertrude is a young female Labrador Retriever and Terrier mix puppy who is available for adoption from Furever After Rescue in Macon, GA.

Hi, my name is Gertrude. I am about 3 months old. No one is quite sure what kind of dog I am, but the best guess is a lab/pit mix.I am a very happy and energetic little girl. I love playing with everyone and everything. I can be a little rambunctious at times, but I listen very well. I am still learning to walk on the leash but I will walk beside you when I am not on it. I am not fully potty trained and have the occasional accident but, I will sleep in a crate through the night and I will whine at the door if I need to go outside. I have cat siblings that I love to play with even though they don’t always like to play with me.

22
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 22, 2021

General William Tecumseh Sherman gained the upper hand in the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864. Estimated casualties were 12,140 (3,641 Union, 8,499 Confederate).

On July 22, 1964, a three-judge panel of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia released their opinion in the case Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States. The court held that the Commerce Clause gave the federal government the ability to order private businesses to comply with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

From the New Georgia Encyclopedia:

Notwithstanding such states’ rights–based challenges, the Court in the Heart of Atlanta Motel and McClung cases unanimously held that the sweeping antidiscrimination provisions of the 1964 Civil Rights Act were a proper exercise of Congress’s power to regulate interstate commerce under Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution. In effect, the Court reasoned that race discrimination by even very localized businesses, when viewed in the aggregate, had such far-reaching negative effects on the interstate movement of people and products that Congress could remove these impediments to commerce whether or not its true motives centered on a moral condemnation of racism.

Ensuing enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 led to the dismantling of many of the most overt forms of racial discrimination, which in turn contributed to the emergence of the “New South” and the explosion of economic activity that spread throughout the region in ensuing decades.

The Heart of Atlanta Motel case would later be heard by the United States Supreme Court.

On July 22, 1975, the United States House of Representatives voted to restore U.S. Citizenship to General Robert E. Lee posthumously.

Though President Andrew Johnson issued a proclamation of amnesty and pardon to the Southern rebels in 1865, it required Lee to apply separately. On Oct. 2, 1865, the same day that Lee was inaugurated as president of Washington College in Lexington, Va., he signed the required amnesty oath and filed an application through Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

Nonetheless, neither was Lee pardoned, nor was his citizenship restored. After receiving it, Secretary of State William Seward gave Lee’s application to a friend as a souvenir. Meanwhile, State Department officials, apparently with Seward’s approval, pigeonholed the oath.

In 1970, an archivist, examining State Department records at the National Archives, found Lee’s lost oath. That discovery helped set in motion a five-year congressional effort to restore citizenship to the general, who had died stateless in 1870.

President Gerald Ford signed the congressional resolution on July 24, 1975, correcting what he said was a 110-year oversight. The signing ceremony took place at Arlington House in Virginia, the former Lee family home. Several Lee descendants, including Robert E. Lee V, his great-great-grandson, attended.

On July 22, 1977, Elvis Costello released his first album, My Aim is True.

The first R.E.M. single and demo tape will be re-released at midnight in Athens, according to the Athens Banner Herald.

Record collectors and Athens music enthusiasts are expected to line up at Wuxtry Records late Thursday night in anticipation of an exclusive midnight launch for the reissue of R.E.M.’s debut single and first demo tape.

Available for the first time since 1981, the original Hib-Tone Records version of “Radio Free Europe” will be released Friday as a 7-inch vinyl single for $15. A reissue of R.E.M.’s first demo tape will also be available featuring “Radio Free Europe,” “Sitting Still” and “White Tornado.”

Copies of the 7-inch single reissue and the cassette demo re-issue are available for pre-order from Wuxtry Records via phone or at the store on Clayton Street where the midnight release will take place. Mitchell said that pre-order receipts will function as admission for the 11 p.m. launch party.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

The Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission will announce the awarding of licenses on Saturday, according to the Capitol Beat News Service via the Rome News Tribune.Continue Reading..

21
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 21, 2021

Union General Irvin McDowell’s forces engaged Confederates under General Pierre G.T. Beauregard and General Joseph Johnston at the First Battle of Manassas/Bull Run on July 21, 1861.

On July 21, 1868, the Georgia General Assembly ratified the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution as a condition for readmission.

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born on July 21, 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois.

On July 21, 1988, Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis accepted the Democratic nomination for President at the National Convention in Atlanta.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Your prayers are requested today for Senator John Albers, his son, Will, their family, and the team who will this morning transplant a kidney from Senator Albers into his son. From the AJC:

With COVID still raging through the state, Albers family took Will to a doctor, who sent them to the hospital. Almost immediately he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with no function in either kidney. Doctors later told them Will had nearly died.

“No parent should ever see their child with that many tubes coming out of them,” Albers said. “I never felt so helpless in my life, to be able to do nothing but literally sit there hold his hand and pray for him.”

It also meant he’d need a kidney transplant, joining the nearly 100,000 people in the country the National Kidney Foundation estimates are also on the list to receive a donor kidney.

That news was grim, since the average wait time to find a suitable donor runs an average of three and a half years. More than 4,000 people die every year waiting for a kidney transplant.

But unlike most other vital organs, kidneys can come from living donors. And direct relatives can be the best donors of all.

Throughout the year-long odyssey of Will’s illness, as his father ran for re-election in his highly contested Roswell-based Senate district, went through the wildly contentious 2021 legislative session, left his job and later got a new one, Sen. Albers never shared the news of Will’s health struggles beyond his immediate family and close circle of friends.

But last week, with the transplant surgery successfully scheduled, Will suggested that his dad post a note to social media.

They could use more prayers than fewer, Will reasoned. And maybe they could help spread the word about living kidney donations, too.

Governor Brian Kemp announced six judicial appointments yesterday.Continue Reading..

20
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 20, 2021

On July 20, 1864, the Battle of Peachtree Creek took place in Atlanta.

Sir Edmund Hillary was born on July 20, 1919 in Auckland, New Zealand. He and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay became the first to summit Mount Everest on May 29, 1953.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people to set foot on the moon.

When the lunar module lands at 4:18 p.m EDT, only 30 seconds of fuel remain. Armstrong radios “Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Mission control erupts in celebration as the tension breaks, and a controller tells the crew “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue, we’re breathing again.”

At 10:56 p.m. EDT Armstrong is ready to plant the first human foot on another world. With more than half a billion people watching on television, he climbs down the ladder and proclaims: “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Aldrin joins him shortly, and offers a simple but powerful description of the lunar surface: “magnificent desolation.” They explore the surface for two and a half hours, collecting samples and taking photographs.

They leave behind an American flag, a patch honoring the fallen Apollo 1 crew, and a plaque on one of Eagle’s legs. It reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon. July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.”

Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton gave the speech nominating Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis for President on July 20, 1988 at the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. Dukakis accepted the nomination the next day.

Clinton’s performance was widely panned.

[Clinton] bombed so badly that there was speculation it might spoil his political future.

The prime-time speech would be a perfect opportunity for Clinton to regain some of the ground he’d lost to Gore and to reestablish himself as the one to watch from the party’s moderate/Southern wing.

But he blew it. The speech he delivered was long – 33 minutes, or twice the expected length – and mechanical. It only took a few minutes for convention delegates to tune him out, as the din of their conversations began drowning him out on television. Eventually, the broadcast networks began cutting away from his speech, with commentators noting the crowd’s complete lack of interest. The lowlight came when Clinton uttered the words “In closing,” prompting a spontaneous round of sarcastic cheers from the audience. His home state paper summed it up this way:

ATLANTA Gov. Bill Clinton’s big national moment his prime time speech Wednesday night in nomination of Michael Dukakis was an unmitigated disaster.

The Los Angeles Times has a great contemporaneous take on the speech.

Valdosta Daily Times wins a special 1980s Headline Writing Merit Award for “It’s a cruel summer at the gas pump.”

“It’s a cruel summer at the gas pump with prices showing little signs of relief,” said Jeanette McGee, AAA spokesperson. “However, the more expensive prices aren’t stopping motorists from filling-up based on strong gasoline demand numbers.”

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Brian Kemp will include crime fighting legislation in his call of a Special Session to redraw legislative districts, according to the Associated Press via the Statesboro Herald.Continue Reading..

19
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 19, 2021

On July 19, 1879, Griffin, Georgia native John Henry “Doc” Holliday killed Mike Gordon after Gordon shot up Holliday’s saloon in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

The 1996 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony was held on July 19, 1996 and competition started the next day.

The Georgia State Quarter was released on July 19, 1999.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

The Georgia Access to Medical Cannabis Commission plans to move forward toward awarding production licenses, according to Fox5Atlanta.Continue Reading..

16
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 16, 2021

On July 16, 1790, Congress declared Washington, DC the new capital city.

On July 17, 1864, General William Tecumseh Sherman set up headquarters in Fulton County on Powers Ferry Road near the Chattahoochee River. Late that night, Confederate General Joseph Johnston was replaced by newly-commissioned Gen. John Bell Hood.

For nearly three months, Johnston and Sherman had maneuvered around the rugged corridor from Chattanooga to Atlanta. Although there was constant skirmishing, there were few major battles; Sherman kept trying to outflank Johnston, but his advances were blocked. Though this kept losses to a minimum, there was also a limit to how long Johnston could maintain this strategy as each move brought the armies closer to Atlanta. By July 17, 1864, Johnston was backed into the outskirts of Atlanta. Johnston felt his strategy was the only way to preserve the Army of Tennessee, but Davis felt that he had given up too much territory.

On July 16, 1914, Asa Griggs Candler, retired President of Coca-Cola, wrote his brother Warren, who was a Bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church, a letter offering one million dollars and 72 acres of land in Atlanta for the church to establish a new university in the East.

The greatest political journalist to ever put pen to paper, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, was born on July 18, 1929. That makes Sunday “Gonzo Day.” You have been warned.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for a third term at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago on July 18, 1940.

President Harry S. Truman signed the second Presidential Succession Act on July 18, 1947

The original succession act designated the Senate president pro tempore as the first in line to succeed the president should he and the vice president die unexpectedly while in office. If he for some reason could not take over the duties, the speaker of the house was placed next in the line of succession. In 1886, during Grover Cleveland‘s administration, Congress removed both the Senate president and the speaker of the house from the line of succession. From that time until 1947, two cabinet officials, (their order in line depended on the order in which the agencies were created) became the next in line to succeed a president should the vice president also become incapacitated or die. The decision was controversial. Many members of Congress felt that those in a position to succeed the president should be elected officials and not, as cabinet members were, political appointees, thereby giving both Republican and Democratic parties a chance at controlling the White House.

In 1945, then-Vice President Truman assumed the presidency after Franklin Roosevelt died of a stroke during his fourth term. As president, Truman advanced the view that the speaker of the house, as an elected official, should be next in line to be president after the vice president. On July 18, 1947, he signed an act that resurrected the original 1792 law, but placed the speaker ahead of the Senate president pro tempore in the hierarchy.

The United States performed the first test of an atomic bomb on July 16, 1945 at the Trinity site in New Mexico.

Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, director of the project, watched the mushroom cloud rise into the New Mexico sky. “Now I am become death, destroyer of worlds,” he uttered, reciting a passage from an ancient Hindu text.

Georgia-born Ty Cobb died on July 17, 1961.

Georgia Congressman Carl Vinson set a new record for longevity in office on July 16, 1963, having served 48 years, 8 months, and 12 days since his election in 1914. Vinson’s record held until 1992 and his tenure is now sixth-longest.

The Beatles premiered The Yellow Submarine on July 17, 1968 in London.

The National Minimum Drinking Age Act was passed by Congress on July 17, 1984. From the New York Times:

President Reagan, appealing for cooperation in ending the “’crazy quilt of different states’ drinking laws,” today signed legislation that would deny some Federal highway funds to states that keep their drinking age under 21.

“We know that drinking, plus driving, spell death and disaster,” Mr. Reagan told visitors on a sweltering afternoon. “We know that people in the 18-to-20 age group are more likely to be in alcohol-related accidents than those in any other age group.”

“It’s a grave national problem, and it touches all our lives,” he added. “With the problem so clear-cut and the proven solution at hand, we have no misgiving about this judicious use of Federal power.”

Under the law Mr. Reagan signed today, the Secretary of Transportation is required to withhold 5 percent of Federal highway construction funds from those states that do not enact a minimum drinking age of 21 by Oct. 1, 1986. The Secretary is required to withhold 10 percent of the funds for states that do not act by Oct. 1, 1987.

The President said he was “convinced” that the legislation would “help persuade state legislators to act in the national interest to save our children’s lives, by raising the drinking age to 21 across the country.”

A senior White House official said after the ceremony that it was not clear that the new law would compel states to raise their drinking ages, even with its incentives and penalties.

He said some states, such as Florida, were proving resistant to the changes because people considered it unfair to allow residents to vote and serve in the armed services at the age of 18 but not to drink in public.

On July 18, 1988, the Democratic National Convention opened at the Omni in Atlanta. That night, actor Rob Lowe would shoot a videotape in a hotel with two hairdressers, one 22 and one 16. Several weeks later, the era of the celebrity sex tape began.

On July 18, 2000, United States Senator Paul Coverdell died of a cerebral hemorrhage. I remember where I was when I heard the news.

A new historical marker in Warner Robins marks the location of an African-American community called Jody Town that was eliminated in the 1970s, according to the Macon Telegraph.

“Jody Town was more than a neighborhood. It was a community. We had businesses. We had churches. We had organizations. We had entertainment. Of course, we had this park, Memorial Park, so it was just a hub of life for military men who came from across the southeast to come lay the foundation for Robins Air Force Base,” Johnson-Granville said.

Nearly 50 years after the neighborhood was destroyed by a federal urban renewal program, the community has been memorialized by a new Civil Rights Trail historical marker in Memorial Park.

The Jody Town Community Reunion Committee, the Georgia Historical Society and the City of Warner Robins unveiled the historical marker on June 29.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Chatham County COVID cases have risen into the red zone, according to the Savannah Morning News.Continue Reading..

15
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 15, 2021

On July 15, 1864, Sherman’s army began crossing the Chattahoochee River and would take the better part of three days to complete the crossing. Georgia Public Broadcasting has a series on Sherman’s Georgia campaign, and you can watch this week’s episode here.

Major General George Stoneman’s cavalry had come to the area south of Atlanta. On July 15, 1864, Stoneman wrote from camp near Villa Rica, Georgia.

As I indicated to you in my last note, we completed the bridge (Moore’s), and were ready to cross at daybreak yesterday morning, but before we essayed it a report came from Major Buck, in command of a battalion seven miles above, that the enemy had been crossing above him on a boat or a bridge, and that his pickets had been cut off.

Colonel Biddle, who was left with his brigade at Campbellton, reports the enemy quite strong at that point, with two guns of long range in each of the two redoubts on the opposite bluff, which are opened upon him whenever any of his men show themselves.

I was very anxious to strike the railroad from personal as well as other considerations, but I became convinced that to attempt it would incur risks inadequate to the results, and unless we could hold the bridge, as well as penetrate into the country, the risk of capture or dispersion, with loss of animals (as I could hear of no ford), was almost certain.

On July 15, 1870, Georgia was readmitted to the United States, with the signature by President Ulysses Grant of the “Georgia Bill” by the U.S. Congress.

On July 15, 1948, President Harry Truman was nominated at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago to run for a full term as President of the United States.

On July 15, 1964, Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater was nominated as the Republican candidate for President.

On July 15, 2006, a group messaging service called Twttr launched, later changing its name to Twitter. May God have mercy upon their souls.

After Williams asked the team of 14 employees to brainstorm their best ideas for the flailing startup, one of the company’s engineers, Jack Dorsey, came up with the concept of a service allowing users to share personal status updates via SMS to groups of people. By March 2006, they had a working prototype, and a name—Twttr—inspired in part by bird sounds, and adopted after some other choices (including FriendStalker) were rejected. Dorsey (@Jack) sent the first-ever tweet (“just setting up my twttr”) on March 21.

Within six months after the launch, Twttr had become Twitter. Once the service went public, its founders imposed a 140-character limit for messages, based on the maximum length of text messages at the time; this was later expanded to 280 characters.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

In observance of Shark Week, the Savannah Morning News brings us news of sharks off the Georgia coast.Continue Reading..

14
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 14, 2021

Happy Bastille Day, celebrating the 232d anniversary of Bastille Day, 14 July 1789, when citizens stormed the Bastille, a prison in Paris.

On July 14, 1798, the Alien and Sedition Act became federal law.

The first three acts took aim at the rights of immigrants. The period of residency required before immigrants could apply for citizenship was extended from five to 14 years, and the president gained the power to detain and deport those he deemed enemies. President Adams never took advantage of his newfound ability to deny rights to immigrants. However, the fourth act, the Sedition Act, was put into practice and became a black mark on the nation’s reputation. In direct violation of the Constitution’s guarantee of freedom of speech, the Sedition Act permitted the prosecution of individuals who voiced or printed what the government deemed to be malicious remarks about the president or government of the United States. Fourteen Republicans, mainly journalists, were prosecuted, and some imprisoned, under the act.

On July 14, 1864, General Sherman issued Special Field Order 35, outlining the plan for the Battle of Atlanta.

Atlanta Brave Hank Aaron hit his 500th Home Run on July 14, 1968.

On July 14, 1976, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter won the Democratic nomination for President at the Democratic National Convention.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Republicans Devan Seabaugh (Cobb HD 34) and Leesa Hagan (South Georgia’s HD 156) won runoff elections yesterday, according to the Associated Press.Continue Reading..

13
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 13, 2021

On July 13, 1787, Congress enacted the Northwest Ordinance, in which states ceded some claims to the west, and a process was set up for admitting new states.

On July 13, 1865, James Johnson as provisional Governor of Georgia, issued a proclamation freeing slaves and calling an election in October of that year to elect delegates to a state Consitutional Convention. Johnson had previously opposed Georgia’s secession and after the war was appointed Governor by President Andrew Johnson.

Savannah, Georgia-born John C. Fremont, who was the first Presidential nominee of the Republican Party in 1856, died in New York City on July 13, 1890.

On July 13, 2013, the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter first appeared on Facebook.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Our personal condolences today for the friends and family of Gene Callaway, a former Georgia State Representative and community activist. From the AJC:Continue Reading..

12
Jul

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 12, 2021

John Percival, an Irish Member of Parliament who served as a Georgia Trustee, was born on July 12, 1733.

In the British House of Commons, Percival served on the committee on jails with a young member named James Oglethorpe, who shared his idea about a new colony in North America for the deserving poor. Percival, like Oglethorpe became a Georgia Trustee, and during Georgia’s first decade, with Oglethorpe in America, Percival worked harder than anyone to champion Georgia’s cause and secure its future.

The United States Army Medal of Honor was created on July 12, 1862 when President Abraham Lincoln signed legislation authorizing the award.

The first U.S. Army soldiers to receive what would become the nation’s highest military honor were six members of a Union raiding party who in 1862 penetrated deep into Confederate territory to destroy bridges and railroad tracks between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Atlanta, Georgia.

Lt. Frank Reasoner of Kellogg, Idaho died in action on July 12, 1965 and was later posthumously awarded the first Medal of Honor to a United States Marines for action in Vietnam.

On July 12, 1984, Congresswoman Geradine Ferraro (R-NY) joined the Democratic ticket with Presidential nominee Walter Mondale. Ferraro was the first woman and first Italian-American woman nominated for Vice President. Mondale and Ferraro lost the General Election in the largest ever Republican landslide to Republican President Ronald Reagan and Vice President George Bush.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Brian Kemp began his reelection campaign, according to FoxNews.

“We need everyone engaged, because we know the Democrats are united,” Kemp told a crowd of supporters Saturday at his campaign kickoff at the Georgia National Fairgrounds in Perry, a solidly conservative part of the Peach State.

Kemp, working to shore up his base, closed his speech by arguing that the Democrats have overplayed their hand in Georgia. “Make no mistake. They’re going to continue to cancel conservatives across the country,” he said. “They are trying to go after anyone in the country that doesn’t share their values.”

Kemp also revealed his fundraising figures, announcing he hauled in $3.9 million over the past three months, with roughly $9.2 million in his campaign coffers with a year to go until the Georgia primary.

From 13WMAZ:

“We want all Georgians, no matter what zip codes or what neighborhood they’re in to have great opportunities, to be safe, and to be strong,” he said in his speech. “We live in the greatest state in the country.”

Continue Reading..