Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for May 19, 2020

19
May

Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for May 19, 2020

The Gwinnett County Shelter continues to accept intake and to do adoptions, but you must call 770-339-3200 first for an appointment.

Melvin Gwinnett

Melvin is a 10-year old male Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption by appointment at the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

We admit it. We’re a sucker for dogs with cute ears. Meet Melvin, an esteemed older gentleman who is a huge fan of mealtime (and snacktime too). Melvin is a big fan of being with other dogs and is an easy-going guy with an old soul. His age does not slow him down, and he loves to go on walks. Melvin is potty-trained and knows how to sit. If his sweet gray muzzle doesn’t pull on your heartstrings, then we don’t know what will!

Arnold Gwinnett

Arnold is a 10-year old male Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption by appointment at the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

Arnold is the sweet old man that greets you when you come into Walmart. He’s everybody’s honorary grandpa. He doesn’t need a lot of attention and often prefers to be by himself anyways. Arnold is looking for a retirement home that will allow him to take long naps, eat lots of good snacks and destroy all the tennis balls that his little heart desires.

Edmond Gwinnett

Edmond is an 8-year old male Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption by appointment at the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter in Lawrenceville, GA.

Edmond would love to be your knight in shining armor. This sweet boy will come and save you from whatever danger you are in. He may even try to charm you into loving him. He says love is blind, and does not care who needs saving whether it be a damsel in distress or a clever thief who has found himself in a bind. This boy loves everyone he meets and is sure to put a smile on your face.

The Humane Society of the United States says the COVID-19 pandemic has led to fewer puppy mill inspections in Georgia, according to the AJC.

Representatives for the organization said they are particularly worried about the condition of puppies since enforcement agencies have suspended on site visits during the coronavirus pandemic. “(During the pandemic) there have been even fewer inspections of the mills. An inspector can identify a small problem and order it to be corrected before it festers and becomes a bigger problem,” said John Goodwin, Senior Director of the Humane Society’s Stop Puppy Mills campaign.

State officials said while they had not been conducting routine investigations during the COVID-19 lockdown, inspectors worked on any complaints that were called in and did make site visits in urgent cases while practicing social distancing. Monday marked the start of the second phase of their COVID-19 response with routine inspections expected to take place three days a week, said spokeswoman Julie McPeake.

The Humane Society’s 2020 Horrible Hundred report released last week included seven Georgia breeders. The Humane Society’s report is based on inspections of dog breeders conducted by the federal and state Departments of Agriculture.

Through its Companion Animal Division, the Georgia Department of Agriculture, is charged with regulating anyone who produces, sells, boards, grooms, offers for adoption, or exchanges pet animals. Last year, the department had about 15 full-time companion animal and equine inspectors and three field supervisors.

Georgia’s enforcement efforts have improved, said Goodwin. “One reason you have a few more entries in Georgia is because the state went out to some of the worst actors,” he said.

During the pandemic, state inspectors filed 176 inspection reports from mid-March to mid-May, said McPeake. The department has also made or attempted to make contact with all 4,000 licensed establishments to conduct surveys on how the pandemic has effected their businesses, she said.

Disclosure: I work part-time for the Humane Society of the United States as a lobbyist.

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