Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 27, 2019

27
Mar

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 27, 2019

Thomas Jefferson was elected as a Virginia delegate to the Second Continental Congress on March 27, 1775.

Colonel James Fannin, a Georgia native and Colonel in the Texas Regular Army and more than 300 other members of the Georgia battalion were executed on March 27, 1836 after surrendering to Santa Anna’s Mexican Army. Fannin County, Georgia is named after Col Fannin.

On March 27, 1912, the first Japanese cherry trees were planted on the northern bank of the Potomac River near the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC. This weekend, Brookhaven will host the Brookhaven Cherry Blossom Festival. For aging GenXers, the band lineup will include Smash Mouth, Spin Doctors, the Romantics, and the Wallflowers.

On March 27, 1941, Governor Eugene Talmadge signed legislation outlawing the handling of venomous snakes in such a way as to endanger another person or to encourage another person to handle a snake in such a way as to endanger them. The legislation resulted from a six-year old handling a venomous snake during a church service in Adel, Georgia, during which she was bitten and died. Under that act you could still handle snakes yourself as long as you didn’t endanger someone else.

On March 27, 1947, Governor Melvin Thompson signed legislation that made Georgia a “Right to Work State,” meaning that employees cannot generally be forced to join a union or pay dues in order to take a job. On the same day, gambling on sporting events was outlawed by another bill signed by Gov. Thompson.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Under the Gold Dome Today – Committee Work Day

8:00 AM HOUSE INSURANCE 606 CLOB
8:00 AM HOUSE AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS 403 CAP
10:00 AM SENATE HIGHER EDUCATION 450 CAP
11:00 AM SENATE FINANCE MEZZ 1
11:00 AM SENATE NATURAL RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT 310 CLOB
11:00 AM HOUSE RETIREMENT 515 CLOB
11:00 AM HOUSE EDUCATION 406 CLOB
11:00 AM HOUSE Regulated Industries Alcohol & Tobacco Subcommittee 514 CLOB
1:00 PM SENATE PUBLIC SAFETY – CANCELLED MEZZ 1
2:00 PM SENATE REGULATED INDUSTRIES & UTILITIES 450 CAP
2:00 PM SENATE EDUCATION & YOUTH – CANCELLED 307 CLOB
2:00 PM HOUSE JUVENILE JUSTICE 606 CLOB
2:00 PM HOUSE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON ACCESS TO QUALITY HEALTH CARE 341 CAP
2:00 PM HOUSE WAYS & MEANS 406 CLOB
3:00 PM SENATE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM – CANCELLED 125 CAP
3:00 PM SENATE HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES- CANCELLED 450 CAP
3:00 PM HOUSE RULES 341 CAP
3:00 PM HOUSE Governmental Affairs Elections Subcommittee 406 CLOB
3:40 PM HOUSE GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS – Upon Adjournment of Governmental Affairs Special Elections Subcommittee 406 CLOB
4:00 PM SENATE JUDICIARY 307 CLOB

Legislation to enhance penalties for hate crime convictions may have hit a speedbump in the state Senate, according to the AJC.

A Senate committee chairman said he believes legislation creating stiffer penalties for people who commit crimes against people based on hate needs “more time” before he will consider it.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Jesse Stone, R-Waynesboro, said he believes victims should have an equal chance at justice and isn’t sure that increased penalties for certain crimes is the best way to go.

The Georgia House earlier this month voted 96-64 to approve a bill that would give sentencing guidelines for anyone convicted of targeting a victim based on race, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, mental disability or physical disability.

State Rep. Chuck Efstration, the bill’s sponsor, said he was disappointed it appeared the measure wasn’t going to pass this year. While he’s spoken with some state senators about the measure, the Dacula Republican said he’s not sure of specific concerns.

“I’m aware of bipartisan support for the legislation,” Efstration said. “Until the bill is heard in open committee, it’s hard to assess what any issues could be.”

House Bill 213, which would allow hemp farming in Georgia, passed the Senate by a 45-6 vote, according to the AJC.

Georgia farmers could begin growing hemp for CBD oil, rope and other products, according to a bill that passed the state Senate on Tuesday.

The Senate voted 45-6 to approve House Bill 213, which would allow the crop as long as it only contains trace amounts of THC, the main psychoactive component of the cannabis plant.

The amended bill now returns to the state House for a final vote.

The Georgia Senate passed legislation to allow citizens to sue governments allegedly acting unconstitutionally, and prohibit sexual extortion, according to The Brunswick News.

State Rep. Jan Jones (R-Alpharetta) has proposed funding menstrual products in some schools, according to the Statesboro Herald.

House Speaker Pro Tem Jan Jones, second in command in the Georgia House and one of the highest-ranking elected Republican women in the state, has argued that eliminating the tax for all consumers of menstrual products wouldn’t make a meaningful difference for those who can’t afford the products to begin with. But she thanked advocates of the bill for bringing the issue of affordability to her attention.

Jones has proposed a targeted grant program that would allot $1 million to the state’s Department of Education and at least another $500,000 to county health departments to supply menstrual products, with the amount being adjusted in the future if necessary. The House has already approved a budget allocating $500,000 each for these programs. The Senate has not yet matched that amount, but Jones remains hopeful the final budget will set aside $1 million for schools.

A Valdosta women’s shelter may be forced to close if the house it is renting is sold, according to the Valdosta Daily Times.

Four museums in Columbus received bomb threats, according to the Ledger-Enquirer.

Congressman Rick Allen (R-Augusta) asked House leadership to consider House Resolution 962, the “Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act,” which he co-sponsored, according to the Augusta Chronicle.

Gwinnett County ranks third-highest in distracted driving convictions per capita, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post.

The Augusta Commission Administrative Services Committee voted to demolish the old jail instead of renovating it, according to the Augusta Chronicle.

Adairsville became the 99th municipality certified by the National Park Service, according to the Rome News Tribune.

The City of Gainesville is hoping to jumpstart development in midtown through private development of city-owned real estate, according to the Gainesville Times.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is using federal funds to investigate protecting shorebirds from predators, according to the Savannah Morning News.

Brunswick is considering how to address dilapidated structures in the coastal Georgia city, according to The Brunswick News.

Comments ( 0 )