Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 20, 2018

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 20, 2018

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George Washington’s Continental Army entered winter quarters at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania on December 19, 1777.

On December 20, 1864, Confederate forces in Savannah retreated ahead of Sherman’s army, crossing over into South Carolina, four years to the day after South Carolina’s secession.

On December 19, 1868, Congress opened hearings into barriers African-Americans faced to voting in Georgia, which included threats, violence, and death, on

Eugene Talmadge, who was elected four times as Governor of Georgia, in 1932, 1934, 1940, and 1946, died on December 21, 1946, leading to the Three Governors Controversy.

On December 19, 1998, President Bill Clinton was impeached by the United States House of Representatives for “high crimes and misdemeanors” for lying under oath and obstructing justice by a vote of 228-206.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former Bartow County Probate Judge Mitchell Scoggins was elected this week in a Special Election to succeed Christian Coomer after Coomer was appointed to the Georgia Court of Appeals, according to the Cartersville Daily Tribune News.

Mitchell Scoggins, a former Bartow County probate judge, won Tuesday’s special Republican primary election, securing 2,048 of the 3,173 votes cast in the race for the state’s District 14 House of Representatives seat.

Scoggins secured roughly 64 percent of all ballots, more than enough to prevent the need for a runoff. Kenneth Coomer came in second with 893 votes (28.14 percent), Nickie Leighly third with 155 votes (4.8 percent) and Nathan Wilson finished last with 77 votes (2.4 percent.)

Among Bartow voters, Scoggins won about 70 percent of the vote, securing 1.910 of the 2,709 ballots cast in the county. Coomer (the father of the district’s former representative) had 631 votes (23 percent) in the county, with Leighly and Wilson collecting 109 (4 percent) and 59 (2.1 percent) votes, respectively.

In total, about 9 percent of eligible voters in the district voted in the special election, including almost 11 percent of eligible Bartow voters.

Bartow County Election Supervisor Joseph Kirk said he was mildly surprised the local turnout surpassed 10 percent.

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