Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for May 23, 2017

23
May

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for May 23, 2017

Serial bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death near Sailes, Louisiana by a group of LA and Texas state police on May 23, 1934.

On May 23, 1954, the NAACP petitioned the Fulton County Board of Education to desegregate after the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education.

Former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter won the Virginia Caucus on May 23, 1976, gaining 24 delegates. On May 25, 1976, Carter won the Arkansas, Tennessee, and Kentucky Primary Elections for President.

On May 23, 1990, the NFL announced that Atlanta would host the 1994 Super Bowl.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

 The State House Rural Development Committee met in Tifton yesterday to begin a series of meetings discussing rural issues.

“Your zip code or county of residence should not dictate your lot in life,” Georgia House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, told members of the House Rural Development Council Monday at its kickoff meeting in Tifton, Ga. “Moving to the big city should not, cannot be the only way to get ahead.”

From the AJC’s coverage:

House leaders promised answers but said they won’t come quickly or easily.

“We are going to make a very concerted effort to deal with a lot of issues,” said state House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Jay Powell, R-Camilla, the council’s co-chairman. “This is a two-year task.”

State House Speaker David Ralston said rural Georgia can’t afford to wait for the next election to find progress and solutions.

“Rural Georgia cannot wait on political seasons to come and go because they will always come and go,” the Blue Ridge Republican said at the council’s first meeting. “I refuse to allow any personal ambitions to get in the way of what we are doing.”

From the Albany Herald,

State representative Ed Rynders is one of 15 on the council.

He said the policy will help stimulate rural Georgia.

“We’ve got problems, where we got to find fixes that isn’t just about writing checks but about developing good policy to strengthen South Georgia,” said Rynders.

“If we’re going to make significant head way and revitalizing rural communities in South Georgia. We got to deal with the people issue, we got to provide leaders,” said Bridges.

More than 5500 new voters have registered in the Sixth Congressional District after a federal judge ordered the reopening of voter registration.

The total includes two types of voter: the newly registered, plus so-called “transfer” applications — already registered Georgia voters who moved into the district after March 20, when the registration period originally closed.

Several thousand additional applications are still pending, although all three counties that have areas that fall within the 6th District — Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton — have been working overtime to process them ahead of the hotly contested June 20 runoff between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff.

The 6th District already boasts more than 521,000 registered voters. The impact of several thousand more is unclear, but it has the potential to swing a race that polling suggests is separated by only a few percentage points and within the margin of error for either candidate.

“It’s not beyond the realm of possibility,” GOP strategist Chip Lake said. But, he added, “we won’t know until the votes are counted and the dust is settled and we can have a definite record-by-record look at who voted.”

Vice President Mike Pence will campaign for Karen Handel on June 9th.

Vice President Mike Pence has plans to stump for Karen Handel’s campaign for Georgia’s 6th District on June 9, which would make him the latest high-profile Republican to trek to suburban Atlanta in the nationally watched race.

The details for Pence’s visit have yet to be finalized, according to people with knowledge of the plans, though it would come as little surprise. Handel has said she is an “all hands on deck” mode ahead of her June 20 runoff against Democrat Jon Ossoff.

John Watson’s campaign for Chairman of the Georgia Republican Party received an endorsement from the Trump campaign’s Georgia Chair.

Rayna Casey called Watson, a former aide to Sonny Perdue, the only contender in the four-candidate contest with a “proven record of success in winning elections.”

“Why take a chance with a likeable amateur when we have a professional willing to volunteer his strategic political expertise, including raising millions, to win our elections?” she wrote in a dispatch sent to GOP activists across the state.

Democracy for America, a progressive PAC, will email its supporters, urging them to support Stacey Abrams in 2018.

Democracy for America, a progressive PAC, is set to send an email to its members encouraging them to “pledge their support” to the Georgia Democrat when she announces she’s formally in the governor’s race.

The organization has more than 32,000 members in Georgia and about a million across the nation, and it’s the first significant group to pledge an endorsement in the still-evolving race for governor.

In a statement, DFA executive director Charles Chamberlain said Abrams is “undoubtedly the best candidate” to lead the state. He cited her opposition in the Legislature to new restrictions on abortions and a tax overhaul that critics saw as unfair to poor Georgians.

“Winning the governorship will require a progressive leader like Stacey who can turn out voters who are ready for a strong contrast to the Republican agenda,” said Chamberlain. “If Stacey Abrams enters the ring, she can count on us to be in her corner.”

The Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office hosted a class in cyber security and crimes for local law enforcement agencies.

Georgia State School Superintendent Richard Woods visited Gainesville to promote summer reading.

“We’re working with our public library systems to make sure that during the summer that not just students, but families, are enrolled together,” Woods told the Gainesville Rotary Club.

He acknowledged following the meeting that he was surprised to learn when he took office that the State Department of Education did not partner with library systems during the summer months to promote summer reading programs.

Woods said DOE is giving away 100,000 books to students across the state this summer, many of those through the public libraries. He said maintaining strong reading skills is a natural tie-in to other subject areas.

Paulding County Commissioners heard from department heads about the FY 2018 budget.

The Fulton County Board of Education tentatively approved a $1.5 billion dollar FY2018 budget unanimously.

Chattahoochee Circuit Juvenile Judges are asking Columbus City Council for a raise.

Georgia Ports Authority notched another monthly record, with more container moves than any prior April, as well as larger ships calling.

The GPA handled 333,006 20-foot containers, or TEUs, last month, which was up nearly 12 percent compared to April 2016. Total tonnage increased across all ports by 13 percent to 2.94 million tons, to mark the GPA’s busiest April ever.

“We feel pretty good about a record TEU count for the FY2017,” Griff Lynch, GPA’s executive director said on Monday.

Much of the recent growth, Lynch said, can be attributed to the Panama Canal expansion and a strong economy.

“… This is really organic growth. We’ve seen larger capacity vessels like the COSCO Development, more moves per vessel and it’s everything that we’ve talked about for years, so we’re happy to see it coming together,” he said.

The COSCO Development, which was the largest container ship to ever call on the U.S. East Coast, arrived May 11 at the GPA’s Garden City Terminal where crews completed 5,500 container moves in 30 hours.

“I think what we’ve shown is not only did we handle it, but we handled it better than anybody else ever did in the U.S.,” Lynch said.

Savannah-Chatham County Board of Education members voted to hire Ann Levett as the next Superintendent, but then started Festivus early with an Airing of Grievances.

Although Levett’s hire was approved pending finalization of the terms of her contract, the board split 5-4 along racial lines, and the four dissenting white board members made their dissatisfaction clear.

The four black board members — Dionne Hoskins, Irene Hines, Ruby Jones and Connie Hall — praised Levett for her extensive experience, educational background and dedication to the district. Levett is a Beach High graduate and worked as a principal in the 1980s. She left to work at districts and universities across the country, including the Comer School Development Program at Yale University School of Medicine. She was hired back four years ago to serve as chief academic officer.

Then one by one the remaining board members listed the reasons they opposed her. Board Member Julie Wade said Levett has surrounded herself with “yes people” and described her leadership style as “dangerous.” Michael Johnson said nearly 100 people in his West Chatham-area district said they don’t want to see her in the position. Shawn Kachmar said the district hasn’t made substantive academic progress.

Board President Jolene Byrne said she doesn’t trust Levett.

“Did you see the red come out those necks? They were bright red during all that talking. I haven’t seen anything like that in a long time,” said Rep. Mickey Stephens, D-Savannah, a former school board member who worked for Levett when she was principal at Savannah High. “That was total disrespect.”

Byrne, Johnson, Kachmar and Wade insisted that their criticisms weren’t personal and pledged to follow board policy and support Levett.

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