RN-T.com – New tests created by the Ga Department of Education are not expected to affect local systems decisions on curriculum

24
Jul

RN-T.com – New tests created by the Ga Department of Education are not expected to affect local systems decisions on curriculum

Educators in Rome and Floyd County will not have to change what they teach students following Georgia’s split with the multi-state testing plan that was part of the controversial Common Core curriculum agreement

Both state Rep. Katie Dempsey, R-Rome, and Floyd County Schools spokesman Tim Hensley agreed Tuesday that the decision for the state to come up with its own tests will not affect the curriculum already in place in school systems.

“At this point, I think we only know the impact the decision has on the assessment of students in regards to testing,” Hensley said. “We haven’t heard any changes to the curriculum or what’s been put into place as far as what we teach our students.”

Georgia was one of 22 states in the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers — formed by state officials to create standardized tests by the 2014-15 school year for math and English. It was to be a way to test students on a new set of education standards being implemented almost nationwide.

The cost of the partnership’s tests has been a concern from the beginning. Georgia budgets between $8-9 per student for testing each year, but the partnership’s test was expected to cost more than $18.

Dempsey said the choice to withdraw from the PARCC test development consortium “was not a decision that was taken lightly.”

via RN-T.com – New tests created by the Ga Department of Education are not expected to affect local systems decisions on curriculum.

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