Shields and Brooks on Georgia gun rights, Southern Senate races

Shields and Brooks discussed the gun law on the PBS NewsHour.

DAVID BROOKS: [I]f you look at the passion, a majority of passionate people on the NRA side. And then they’re just dispersed. A lot of people who are most passionate about controlling guns are in a few metro areas. And it’s just a huge advantage to be dispersed around the country where you can hit pressure points at a lot of points. NRA takes full advantage of that.

MARK SHIELDS: CBS/New York Times poll, Judy, do you favor a federal background check on all gun owners, 85-12 in favor of it. Among gun owners, it’s 84-14 in favor of it, among Republicans, 84-13.

So, it does — it comes down to intensity and it comes down to political experience. Colorado passed, after two terrible tragedies at Aurora and Columbine, the theater and the high school, they passed a gun background check and a limit of 15 rounds to a magazine, 15 rounds to a magazine. That’s what passed. And they had two Democratic senators, including the state Senate president, who was a former police chief, recalled — first time in the history of Colorado they have been recalled from office.

Another senator facing recall resigned, so that the Democratic Party could fill her position. So, I mean, this sends a ripple effect. David’s point about intensity is the key. I mean, last week, we saw the pipeline decision. There is a majority — not anywhere approaching these numbers — in favor of building the pipeline, but those who are most opposed to the pipeline do so with greater intensity and with bigger checkbooks and with greater political activism and urgency.

The duo also dipped their toes into the Georgia Senate race:

DAVID BROOKS: I think two things are true. There are a number of Republicans I have had recently tell me, I wonder if we peaked too soon, that the intensity in health care, some of the other stuff, they were stronger a few months ago than it is. There’s been some movement on the health care law, and so maybe that.

I still think the fundamental structure of this midterm election is very positive toward Republicans, the president’s unapproval rating. And when people start focusing, I think it is going to be a tough year for Democrats. But you have got some good candidates in some of those states. I think Georgia is one of them.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Right, and actually not in this poll. But there are…

DAVID BROOKS: OK, well, but there are some good Democratic candidates.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Michelle Nunn.

DAVID BROOKS: And — but I guess I’m — I would want to see a bunch more polls, even though it was the sainted New York Times poll….

 

Shields and Brooks on Georgia gun rights, Southern Senate races.

11Alive poll: Mixed support for new Georgia gun law

Last week, Gov. Nathan Deal signed into law the bill that broadens gun rights in Georgia. It includes the provision that allows guns in bars unless specifically disallowed.

An 11Alive poll shows Georgians are also not sold on carrying guns into bars. On that provision of the new gun law, 50 percent of those polled disagree with it. Only 38 percent agree. The poll has a margin of error of two and a half percent.

The statewide telephone poll of 2,340 adults was taken April 24-27. You can see the complete crosstabs here.

They’re more evenly split on whether to allow guns into houses of worship. Our poll shows a statistical tie on that question — 48% to 47% in favor.

They narrowly agree with guns in the non-secure areas of airports, 48% to 41%.

That kind of support is what rallied the governor and lawmakers to enact the gun law on the final day of the 2014 legislative session. It included the support of Sen. Jason Carter, the Democrat who will run for governor this fall.They agree with allowing conditions for some employees to carry guns in schools, 54% to 38%.

“Ultimately, you’re talking about people who have a license to carry in a state where the second amendment is incredibly important,” Carter told MSNBC on April 21.

But our poll shows that portions of the gun law aren’t popular.

It allows guns into government buildings that don’t have metal detectors. Georgians disagree by 56% to 34%.

They law undid a requirement for fingerprints from gun permit applicants. Georgians disagree with that 49% to 42%.

They also disagree with the part that forbids the state from creating a database of licensed gun owners, 48% to 40%.

The poll tracks along gender and racial lines. Women and African Americans tend to oppose the new gun law the most. Whites and men are the biggest backers of the new gun law.

via 11Alive poll: Mixed support for new Georgia gun law.

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for May 1, 2014

Nolan

Nolan is an easygoing, laid-back Chocolate Lab mix who loves most other dogs (except dominant males) and plays easily with puppies or friendly dogs. Nia, below, is a mixed breed female who is Nolan’s best friend. They play together, hang out in the sun, and cuddle on the couch. Nolan and Nia are available for adoption from Life is Labs Rescue in Temple, Georgia, either separately or as a pair, though they strongly prefer to find a forever home together.

Nolan was featured previously in the Daily Dogs and is still looking for a home.

Nia

Ryan

Ryan is a young, male Cattle Dog who was pulled from an Oconee County, SC shelter and is now available for adoption from Clover Run Rescue in Jefferson, Georgia. He is very energetic and loves playing with other dogs. He gets along with everyone and just wants to have a person or family to play with and call his own.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for May 1, 2014

On May 1, 1707, the Act of Union with England, passed by the Scottish Parliament brought together England and Scotland and made the Union Jack the official flag of Great Britain.

The Second Confederate National Flag was adopted on May 1, 1863.

On May 1, 1886, Jefferson Davis visited the Benjamin Hill monument at Peachtree and West Peachtree Streets in Atlanta, having arrived the previous day.

Kennesaw, Georgia City Council adopted an ordinance on May 1, 1982 requiring each household to own a gun and ammunition.

(a) In order to provide for the emergency management of the city, and further in order to provide for and protect the safety, security and general welfare of the city and its inhabitants, every head of household residing in the city limits is required to maintain a firearm, together with ammunition therefore.

(b) Exempt from the effect of this section are those heads of households who suffer a physical or mental disability which would prohibit them from using such a firearm. Further exempt from the effect of this section are those heads of households who are paupers or who conscientiously oppose maintaining firearms as a result of beliefs or religious doctrine, or persons convicted of a felony.

On May 1, 1991, Rickey Henderson broke the major league baseball stolen base record on the same day that Nolan Ryan, the greatest pitcher in the history of baseball, recorded his seventh no-hitter.

The official state tartan of Georgia was designated on May 1, 1997.

From the Governor’s Desk

Governor Deal on Tuesday issued ten vetoes of legislation passed by the Georgia General Assembly, including House Bill 837 to change the private administration of probation in Georgia.

The private probation bill, which was the subject of a scathing state audit, is the only major bill Deal will be vetoing. Critics say the measure would have allowed private probation companies to conceal details of their dealings from the public.

“There were a lot of red flags raised in the audit, with regard to the process, the procedures, the reporting mechanism and quite frankly the failure to follow existing protocols established both through the office of the courts that has oversight over it, as well as some of the statutory requirements,” he told reporters after the bill signing.

In his veto statement, Deal said, “There is language in this legislation that would exempt certain key information about private probation services from the Georgia Open Records Act. I favor more transparency over private probation services and therefore I am not in favor of this information being exempt from the Georgia Open Records Act. In addition, it is my understanding that the Supreme Court of Georgia has under its consideration an appeal that would address the role of private probation services and, while the current law pertaining to private probation services remains in effect, this legislation seeks to have a preemptive impact on any decision in that appeal.”

Here are some background facts on the use of private probation companies in Georgia, from Walter Jones of Morris News.

The bill would have allowed the companies that monitor people on probation for minor crimes the ability to ask judges to extend the sentences of those who don’t pay the cost of the monitoring. Private firms now supervise an estimated 80 percent of those convicted or pleading guilty to misdemeanors and who can’t cough up their full fines while they’re in court. Georgia has the country’s highest rate of people on probation, according to the Georgia Center for Human Rights.

“On probation, they must pay these companies substantial monthly ‘supervision fees’ that may double the amount that a person of means would pay for the same offense,” said Sarah Geraghty, senior attorney for the Southern Center.

The bill would permit the details of the supervisory fees and the finances of these companies to remain confidential even though other aspects of state law make firms carrying out government functions subject to Georgia’s sunshine laws.

House Resolution 1183, by State Rep. Kevin Tanner, adds a Constitutional Amendment to the November ballot.

Shall the Constitution of Georgia be amended to allow additional reckless driving penalties or fees to be added to the Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund to pay for care and rehabilitative services for Georgia citizens who have survived neurotrauma with head or spinal cord injuries?”

Under House Bill 870, the companion legislation, a 10 percent surcharge will be assessed on reckless driving fines.

Personally, I will vote “Yes” on the Constitutional Amendment in November.

Governor Deal has been endorsed by the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) for his stewardship of the state economy.

“Governor Deal has done an outstanding job as governor and proven to our members that he not only understands the challenges facing Georgia’s small, family businesses but will do everything he can to help small businesses compete and grow and create jobs,” said Kyle Jackson, state director of NFIB/Georgia.

Campaign Ads

Tricia Pridemore dropped her first ad in the Eleventh Congressional District race.

Bob Barr’s first ad is also up today.

Along with an endorsement from Steve Forbes.

Yesterday, we linked the wrong video for Paul Broun: here is his ad.

Finally, Jack Kingston’s latest, called “Tupperware.”

Polling the gun law

SurveyUSA and 11Alive have a poll that follows up on an InsiderAdvantage/Atlanta Business Chronicle survey that shows the recently-passed gun bill is not overwhelmingly favored by Georgians. From the SurveyUSA writeup:

  • By a 16-point margin, Georgia adults agree with a provision of the law which allows school boards to vote on whether staff members can bring guns to campus, and, if allowed, requires staff members to undergo training. 54% agree, 38% disagree with this provision.
  • By a 7-point margin, 48% to 41%, Georgians agree with allowing guns up to but not past the security checkpoints in airports, and permitting a person who accidentally brings a gun to the checkpoint to take the gun and leave without penalty.
  • Georgians split evenly over letting churches decide if they wish to allow guns or not.
  • A 7-point margin disagrees with the part of the new law eliminating the requirement gun owners be fingerprinted to renew their licenses. 49% disagree, 42% agree.
  • By 8 points, 48% to 40%, Georgia adults disagree with the part of the new law preventing the state from creating a database of licensed gun owners.
  • By 12 points, 50% to 38%, Georgia disagrees with the portion of the law allowing guns in bars.
  • By 22 points, 56% to 34%, Georgia disagrees with the portion of the law allowing guns in certain government buildings.

Shields and Brooks discussed the gun law on the PBS NewsHour.

DAVID BROOKS: [I]f you look at the passion, a majority of passionate people on the NRA side. And then they’re just dispersed. A lot of people who are most passionate about controlling guns are in a few metro areas. And it’s just a huge advantage to be dispersed around the country where you can hit pressure points at a lot of points. NRA takes full advantage of that.

MARK SHIELDS: CBS/New York Times poll, Judy, do you favor a federal background check on all gun owners, 85-12 in favor of it. Among gun owners, it’s 84-14 in favor of it, among Republicans, 84-13.

So, it does — it comes down to intensity and it comes down to political experience. Colorado passed, after two terrible tragedies at Aurora and Columbine, the theater and the high school, they passed a gun background check and a limit of 15 rounds to a magazine, 15 rounds to a magazine. That’s what passed. And they had two Democratic senators, including the state Senate president, who was a former police chief, recalled — first time in the history of Colorado they have been recalled from office.

Another senator facing recall resigned, so that the Democratic Party could fill her position. So, I mean, this sends a ripple effect. David’s point about intensity is the key. I mean, last week, we saw the pipeline decision. There is a majority — not anywhere approaching these numbers — in favor of building the pipeline, but those who are most opposed to the pipeline do so with greater intensity and with bigger checkbooks and with greater political activism and urgency.

The duo also dipped their toes into the Georgia Senate race:

DAVID BROOKS: I think two things are true. There are a number of Republicans I have had recently tell me, I wonder if we peaked too soon, that the intensity in health care, some of the other stuff, they were stronger a few months ago than it is. There’s been some movement on the health care law, and so maybe that.

I still think the fundamental structure of this midterm election is very positive toward Republicans, the president’s unapproval rating. And when people start focusing, I think it is going to be a tough year for Democrats. But you have got some good candidates in some of those states. I think Georgia is one of them.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Right, and actually not in this poll. But there are…

DAVID BROOKS: OK, well, but there are some good Democratic candidates.

JUDY WOODRUFF: Michelle Nunn.

DAVID BROOKS: And — but I guess I’m — I would want to see a bunch more polls, even though it was the sainted New York Times poll….

The Georgia Transportation Alliance, affiliated with the Georgia Chamber of Commerce, released results of a survey on transportation funding. From Dave Williams at the Atlanta Business Chronicle:

Georgia voters want Congress to restock the Federal Highway Trust Fund before it runs out of money, according to a poll released Wednesday by an organization of road builders and other transportation-related businesses.

The survey of 500 registered voters found that 68 percent believe transportation is “very important” to their daily lives, and 61 percent believe adequate roads, bridges and public transportation are very important to the state’s economy.

Sixty-two percent said it’s very important that Congress put more money into the trust fund, which could become insolvent as early as June if it’s not replenished.

Broken down by political affiliation, 53 percent of self-identified Republicans said congressional action on the trust fund is very important, while 78 percent of Democrats took the same position.

A Gallup poll from 2013 shows one-third of Georgians think the Peach State would best be viewed in their rear-view mirrors. Among the likely culprits: state taxes that 53% of respondents said are too high, versus 45% who say state taxes are not too high. Sixty-three percent of Georgians trust our state government either “a great deal” or “a fair amount.”

Minimum wage bill killed

Republicans in the United States Senate blocked passage of a change that would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 per hour to $10.10 in three steps over thirty months. Georgia Republicans Saxby Chambliss and Johnny Isakson both voted no.

Gov. Nathan Deal: Endorsed BY NFIB

Your Georgia Desk:

rp_Deal-Banner2.jpg

From Governor Nathan Deal:

NFIB endorses Deal for second term as governor
The National Federation of Independent Business, the nation’s and Georgia’s leading small business association, said this week it has endorsed Nathan Deal for a second term as governor.
“Governor Deal has done an outstanding job as governor and proven to our members that he not only understands the challenges facing Georgia’s small, family businesses but will do everything he can to help small businesses compete and grow and create jobs,” said Kyle Jackson, state director of NFIB/Georgia. Continue reading

Sen. Johnny Isakson: Senate Republicans Introduce Strategic U.S. Response To Deter Russian Aggression In Europe

Your Washington Desk:

From Senator Johnny Isakson:

Isakson, Senate Republicans Introduce Strategic U.S. Response to Deter Russian Aggression in Europe

U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., today introduced legislation with 20 Senate Republicans providing a strategic U.S. response to deter Russian aggression in Europe.

Isakson said Russia’s actions are threatening regional security and prosperity and could eventually harm economic growth in the United States.

“We as a country will not stand by and allow Russia to deliberately disregard international law or President Putin’s continued violation of Ukrainian sovereignty that threatens the peace and security of the region,”said Isakson. “There must be consequences for the rogue actions taken by the Russian Federation and those responsible for undermining the sovereignty, integrity and government of Ukraine.  Continue reading

Rep. Tom Graves: Votes For Veterans Funding, VA Accountability, Solutions For Claims Backlog

Your Washington – GA 14 – Desk

From Congressman Tom Graves:

Rep. Graves Votes For Veterans Funding, VA Accountability, Solutions For Claims Backlog

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Rep. Tom Graves (R-GA-14) voted for, and the House passed, the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act, which includes increased funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in order to implement solutions for the disability claims backlog, increase oversight and improve benefits that veterans and their families have earned in the service of the United States.

“We have a moral obligation to provide the highest quality care and benefits for our veterans,” said Rep. Graves. “Tragically, the federal government’s failures have hurt many veterans in recent years. Continue reading