The blog.

6
Mar

DA to seek indictment against Peachtree City police chief | www.ajc.com

The district attorney in Fayette County said Thursday that he will seek an indictment against Peachtree City police Chief William McCollom for the shooting of Margaret McCollom.

Margaret McCollom was reportedly left paralyzed by the incident, which the chief said occurred as the couple slept.

Griffin Judicial Circuit District Attorney Scott Ballard said he intends to present the case to a Fayette County Grand Jury on April 15, and will seek an indictment of misdemeanor reckless conduct.

The GBI investigated the incident and turned the results of the investigation over to the district attorney.

via DA to seek indictment against Peachtree City police chief | www.ajc.com.

6
Mar

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for March 6, 2015

By order of the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the Dublin/Laurens County Humane Society must find placement for 125 dogs (down from an initial 200, but subject to more dogs being brought in) by March 23, 2015 or the dogs will be euthanized.

Using the hashtag “Savethe200″ on its Facebook page, the organization hopes families will adopt the dogs before they have to be put down.

Hoping to increase the chances of adoption, the shelter will now stay open on Monday – Thursday from 10:00 a.m. till 5:00 p.m., and on Fridays and Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. till 6:00 p.m.

Dublin24418628

24418628 is a young male Black Labrador Retriever who is available for adoption from the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society.

Dublin24578788

A24578788 is a year-and-a-half old Hound mix female who is available for adoption from the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society. Look at how sweet she is.

Dublin24767414

24767414 is a 7-month old Black Lab mix male who is available for adoption from the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society.

Dublin24855601

24855601 is a sweet 4-year old male Redtick Coonhound mix who is available for adoption from the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society.

Dublin24813603

24813603 is a 5-month old Retriever mix female who is available for adoption from the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society.

This Saturday, March 17, 2015 in Dublin, a Pet Contest will be held to benefit the Dublin-Laurens Humane Society.

DublinStPawtricks

On Saturday, Macon-Bibb Animal Welfare is holding an “Empty the Shelter Adoption Day,” which includes “Pardons” for adoptable dogs, meaning their adoption fees will be reduced.

From the Macon Telegraph:

In partnership with national animal-rescue advocate Shane Smith and former Animal Control Officer Van VanDeWalker, all the animals currently in the shelter will be “pardoned” in hopes of having them adopted, and adoption fees will be reduced during the four-day event.

On Monday there were 46 [now 27] dogs and cats in the shelter at 1010 11th St., said Assistant County Manager Steve Layson.

The adoption special is tied to Animal Welfare’s impending move to a new building at 4214 Fulton Mill Road, Layson said. The department wants to reduce the number of animals that must be moved, but organizers also hope to build momentum that will continue through the new Animal Welfare Center’s opening, he said.

The long-awaited move should begin next week, and the new center is expected to be open Feb. 16, though the current shelter also will stay open as employees and animals settle in, Layson said.

“We’ll have to run a parallel operation to the one we have now,” he said.

I’m told that even if you’re not planning to adopt this weekend, you’re welcome to come meet the animals.

6
Mar

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 6, 2015

On March 6, 1857, the United States Supreme Court published its opinion in Sanford v. Dred Scott.

the Court held that African Americans, whether slave or free, could not be American citizens and therefore had no standing to sue in federal court,and that the federal government had no power to regulate slavery in the federal territories acquired after the creation of the United States. Dred Scott, an African American slave who had been taken by his owners to free states and territories, attempted to sue for his freedom. In a 7–2 decision written by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, the Court denied Scott’s request and in doing so, ruled an Act of Congress in this case—the Missouri Compromise of 1820 which prohibited slavery north of the parallel 36°30′ north—to be unconstitutional for the second time in its history.

The decision would prove to be an indirect catalyst for the American Civil War and was functionally superseded by the post-war Reconstruction Amendments. It is now widely regarded as the worst decision ever made by the Supreme Court.

One member of the Court that decided Dred Scott was Associate Justice James M Wayne, who was born in Savannah and served in Congress from Georgia from 1829 to 1835.

On March 7, 1861, delegates to the Georgia Secession Convention reconvened in Savannah to adopt a new state Constitution. A resolution offering to host the Confederate Capitol did not pass.

On March 7, 1965, a group of marchers led by Martin Luther King, Jr., met Alabama State Troopers on the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

“I was hit in the head by a state trooper with a nightstick… I thought I saw death.”

—John Lewis, SNCC leader

As a student of Southern politics at Emory, we were immersed in reading about the Civil Rights Movement and its effect on Southern politics, and American politics. But it was not until years later that I saw the PBS series called “Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Movement 1956-1985.” It’s chilling to see American citizens turned away by armed police from attempts to register to vote.

That’s John Lewis, now the United States Congressman from the Fifth District in the front row wearing a light-colored overcoat and backpack.

Earlier this year, Patrick Saunders of the GaVoice asked Lewis what was in his backpack that day.

What was in the backpack?

I remember very well. As a matter of fact I went to the Army surplus store and bought this backpack. I really thought we were going to be successful walking all the way from Selma to Montgomery. And somehow, someway I thought maybe we would be arrested and we would go to jail, so while in jail I wanted to have something to read. I had two books in the backpack. I wanted to have something to eat—I had one apple and one orange. One apple and one orange wouldn’t last that long. Being in jail, you know I had been arrested and been to jail before, the sad thing about being in jail for two or three days, you need to brush your teeth. So there was toothpaste and a toothbrush in there.

I don’t know what happened to that backpack, I don’t know what happened to the two books. I don’t know what happened to the trench coat. One of the books was by a professor of political science at Harvard and the other book was by Thomas Merton, the monk. I just wished I had them. The Smithsonian and the Library of Congress are always asking me what happened to them and I tell them I really don’t know.

Under the Gold Dome Today

8:30am – 9:30am Senate Appropriations Education – 310 clob
9:00am – 10:00am Senate Appropriatons Econ. Dev. – mezz 1
10:00am – 11:00am House Jacobs Sub of Judiciary Civil – 132 cap- Cancelled
10:00am – 11:00am Senate Appropriations Nat’l Resources – 450 cap
12:00pm – 2:00pm Senate Insurance & Labor – mezz 1
2:00pm – 3:00pm House MARTA Oversight Committee – 406 clob

Georgia Transportation Tax Bill Passes State House

House Bill 170, the Transportation Finance Act of 2015 passed the State House of Representatives yesterday by a 123-46 vote with four members present but not voting and seven members absent. Click here to see how your State Representative voted.Continue Reading..

5
Mar

Deal on Senate passage of Opportunity School District legislation

Gov Deal Budget Speech

Governor’s proposal to create Opportunity School District for failing schools moves to House

Gov. Nathan Deal today praised the Senate for passing legislation that would allow for an Opportunity School District (OSD) to aid chronically failing schools throughout the state. The constitutional amendment resolution and the implementing legislation will now move to the House for consideration.

“Today, we are one step closer to creation of an Opportunity School District, and one step closer to restoring children’s and parents’ hopes for a brighter future,” Deal said. “We’ve seen the successes that Louisiana, Tennessee and Michigan attained with similar, bipartisan measures. Working together, I believe Georgians can achieve the same for our students and families. I congratulate Sen. Butch Miller on his diligence and hard work in advancing these education reforms, and I commend the courage of the 37 other senators who supported this legislation. As the House considers this bill, I am confident that its members will also put the needs of Georgia’s most vulnerable students first. Through the efforts of our legislators, we will put this referendum on the ballot so that Georgians can assure that a child’s chance of success isn’t dependent on his or her ZIP code.”

The OSD legislation requires a constitutional amendment, for which there must be a two-thirds majority in both houses and majority approval by Georgia voters at the next general election. The OSD would allow the state to intervene in schools that have received failing grades for three consecutive years. The district could add no more than 20 schools per year, for a total of 100 at any given time. The schools would remain in the OSD for no less than five years and no more than 10 years.

“The Opportunity School District will allow us to bring new focus by education experts, better governance and best practices to schools that have underachieved for too long. The children trapped in these schools can’t wait. I believe all children can learn, but we have an obligation to provide access for high-quality education to those students and parents who are anxious for a better future. It’s my vision – and that of many legislators here – that every high school graduate in Georgia should have the skills needed to enter the workforce or further their educations in college.”

5
Mar

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for March 5, 2014

Buttercup

Buttercup is a sweet little Hound puppy, about two months old. Here’s her story:

My name is Butter Cup and I have been waiting my whole life to meet you! I dreamed of one day having a forever family and I just know that you are it! As my new family you will give me good food to eat, lots of squeak and chew toys to play with, a warm bed to sleep in, and plenty of love and attention every day for the rest of my life. Above all else you will be patient with me as I make the transition from living in a shelter to living in a real forever home. If you think I could capture the hearts of you and your family, drop by the Atlanta Humane Society Howell Mill Campus to get to know me today! I was altered on 3/2 so no baths or rough play for 10 days.

Buttercup is available for adoption from Atlanta Human Society at the Howell Mill Campus.

Buttercup attended yesterday’s press conference to announce the Official State Dog of Georgia.

Official Georgia Dog 1200px

Clover

Clover is a beautiful lady with a shy demeanor, a young adult Black-and-Tan Coonhound. Although Clover loves people very much, she is not so fond of other animals. She’d very much prefer to be reigning queen in her new home. Loud and sudden noises seem to startle Clover, but it’s partly because this curious lady is constantly alert. A big back yard would be the perfect environment for Clover to flourish as she loves to continually sniff her surroundings. This sweet girl is looking for her forever home. With patience, love, and attention, Clover will soon be a comfortable and confident new dog. Come visit Clover today!

Clover is available for adoption from Atlanta Human Society at the Howell Mill Campus.

Jambalaya

We’re not sure how this young male Shepherd/Mix got his Cajun name, but it’s not the only thing that makes Jambalaya unique. He could play centerfield for the Atlanta Braves. Toss up a tennis ball and Jambalaya will follow it in the air and snatch it in his mouth just before it hits the ground – he rarely misses! It’s pretty amazing. Jambalaya is a big dog with a lot of energy. He’ll need some training to learn how to leash walk and not jump when he gets too excited. He’s best for adults or families with older children. He’ll need a home with a fenced yard. Once he settles down, he’ll easily nudge into you for a good belly rub. And when you say “sit,” Jambalaya does one of two things: he’ll either sit or lay down on all fours. So he’ll be a pro with just a little more practice. Jambalaya is a lot of fun and already altered. Come see him today at Howell Mill. Be ready to throw him some tennis balls! Jambalaya is one of Atlanta Humane’s Forget Me Not Pets” and has a reduced adoption fee.

Jambalaya is available for adoption from Atlanta Human Society at the Howell Mill Campus.

Lisa

Hi! My name is Lisa. I am a sweet, enthusiastic Black Lab mix puppy looking for a home to call my own. I hope to find a family who can give me some yummy food to eat, lots of squeak and chew toys to play with, a warm bed to sleep in, and plenty of love and attention every day for the rest of my life. Please remember that all new pets, even adults, need time to learn the rules of a new home, so be patient with me as I make that transition. If you think I could capture the hearts of you and your family, drop by the Atlanta Humane Society Howell Mill Campus to get to know me today! I was altered 3/3, so no baths or rough play until 3/14/15.

Lisa is available for adoption from Atlanta Human Society at the Howell Mill Campus.

Jeremy Redmon wrote about the Official State Dog legislation for the AJC.

With so many good ones to choose from, why name just one as Georgia’s official state dog?

All “adoptable dogs,” or those held in animal shelters, would get that title if state Rep. Joe Wilkinson of Atlanta has his way. He plans to introduce legislation Thursday to make that so, hoping to encourage more people to adopt homeless dogs.

Wilkinson said he isn’t predicting “ruff” sledding for his measure, even though fellow University of Georgia alums in the Legislature may prefer making the bulldog the official state pooch. Wilkinson may have insulated himself from such dog fights by bringing English bulldogs Zeus and Meaty to his news conference Wednesday at the state Capitol. Slobbering and grunting, the two flanked Wilkinson as he outlined how every type of homeless dog would have his day in Georgia.

“So far, everyone is agreeing this is a great idea,” said Wilkinson, who described how pets filled a void in his young life as his father suffered from strokes. “Right now, our goal is to bring attention to the fact that these animals are available for adoption and should be adopted.”

Sandra Parrish also attended, for WSB radio, and filed this story:

Rep. Joe Wilkinson (R-Sandy Springs) built up suspense this week at the State Capitol as people tried to guess which breed he would propose to represent the state.

On Monday, he held a press conference with members of the Atlanta Human Society and other animal groups to bring attention to the plight of homeless dogs.  Several furry friends were also in tow.

“Our goal is to bring attention to the fact that these animals are available for adoption; they should be adopted and if you can’t adopt, you can contribute,” says Wilkinson.

He says Georgia was founded as a state of second chances and what better way show that by supporting the adoption of homeless pets.

Zeus Grassroots Support

Zeus above shows his grassroots support for the Official State Dog legislation.

Meaty and Zeus

Meaty (left) and Zeus (right), ambassadors for Georgia English Bulldog Rescue stole the show at the press conference, where they attended to bring attention to the fact that even English Bulldogs end up in shelters and rescue groups.

Learn more about Georgia English Bulldog Rescue at their website.

Also attending were representatives from Fix Georgia Pets, an organization that raises money to provide free or reduced cost spay and neuter services.

5
Mar

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 5, 2015

On March 5, 1735, James Oglethorpe presented a budget to the trustees of Georgia and proposed seeking an appropriation from Parliament, thus beginning the addiction of the Georgia government to Other People’s Money.

On March 5, 1869, the United States Congress refused to seat Georgia’s elected members of the House and Senate.

On March 5, 1977, President Jimmy Carter held the first “Dial-A-President” radio broadcast in which he fielded questions from radio listeners.

Ron Daniel brings you more on the Presidential Q&A from 1977.

Regardless of Carter’s policy positions and his answers to questions, “Ask President Carter” was a truly historic broadcast. Never before had the President been accessible via telephone on a live radio broadcast. And the questions presented to the President weren’t confined to one or two issues that he had been prepared to handle. One can argue that the American people were also fascinated with the concept of calling and speaking directly to Carter; nine million people called into the broadcast trying to reach him.

The President seemed to enjoy the broadcast as well, remarking: “[t]he questions that come in from people all over the country are the kind that you would never get in a press conference. The news people would never raise them, like the Ottawa Indian question. And I think it’s very good for me to understand directly from the American people what they are concerned about and questions that have never been asked of me and reported through the news media.”

Continue Reading..

4
Mar

Lawmaker proposes “adoptable dogs” as official state dog | www.wsbradio.com

A state lawmaker has introduced a bill to make the official dog of Georgia the “adoptable dog”.

Rep. Joe Wilkinson (R-Sandy Springs) built up suspense this week at the State Capitol as people tried to guess which breed he would propose to represent the state.

On Monday, he held a press conference with members of the Atlanta Human Society and other animal groups to bring attention to the plight of homeless dogs. Several furry friends were also in tow.

“Our goal is to bring attention to the fact that these animals are available for adoption; they should be adopted and if you can’t adopt, you can contribute,” says Wilkinson.

via Lawmaker proposes “adoptable dogs” as official state dog | www.wsbradio.com.

4
Mar

Georgia lawmaker: Make all homeless dogs state’s official pooch | www.ajc.com

With so many good ones to choose from, why name just one as Georgia’s official state dog?

All “adoptable dogs,” or those held in animal shelters, would get that title if state Rep. Joe Wilkinson of Atlanta has his way. He plans to introduce legislation Thursday to make that so, hoping to encourage more people to adopt homeless dogs.

Wilkinson said he isn’t predicting “ruff” sledding for his measure, even though fellow University of Georgia alums in the Legislature may prefer making the bulldog the official state pooch. Wilkinson may have insulated himself from such dog fights by bringing English bulldogs Zeus and Meaty to his news conference Wednesday at the state Capitol. Slobbering and grunting, the two flanked Wilkinson as he outlined how every type of homeless dog would have his day in Georgia.

via Georgia lawmaker: Make all homeless dogs state’s official pooch | www.ajc.com.

4
Mar

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for March 4, 2015

Buddy

Buddy is an adult male Treeing Walker Coonhound who is available for adoption from Friends of Screven County Animals in Sylvania, GA.

Sunshine

Sunshine is a small adult female Labrador Retriever mix who enjoys walking on a leash, is friendly, and is available for adoption from Friends of Screven County Animals in Sylvania, GA.
Houdini

Houdini is a young male Vizsla or Lab mix who was found with his brother and sister at a dump and had been living in the woods.  Houdini is available for adoption from Friends of Screven County Animals in Sylvania, GA.

If you’re at the Georgia State Capitol today at 1 PM and like dogs, please come visit us in Room 403.

Jim Galloway of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution suggests this morning that the Hound dog might be a strong contender for Official State Dog of Georgia. Jim’s as tenacious as a Hound with a Gray Fox (or the neighbor’s cat) treed, and he may be on to something here. Perhaps State Rep. Joe Wilkinson (R-Sandy Springs) will let something slip this morning during Morning Orders on the floor of the State House. Say, maybe at around 10:30 or 10:40 AM.

4
Mar

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 4, 2015

On March 4, 1762, legislation was passed by the Georgia General Assembly requiring church attendance on Sundays.

On March 3, 1779, British troops met Continental militia from North Carolina and a combination of Georgia militia and Continentals under Samuel Elbert in Screven County, Georgia at the Battle of Brier Creek. In 2013, key geographic features were identified to better determine the exact location of the battle and some period military artifacts were found. Currently, a group of descendants of Brier Creek soldiers is actively trying to persuade the Georgia Department of Natural Resources Board to conserve the area in which the Battle of Brier Creek took place. If you’re interested in Georgia’s revolutionary history, the Descendants of Brier Creek page on Facebook is a treasure trove.

The rout of Americans by the British at Brier Creek was a considerable setback that changed the momentum in the Brits’ favor and gave them control over Georgia, which they would retain for three years.

On March 4, 1861, Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as President of the United States.

In his inaugural address, Lincoln promised not to interfere with the institution of slavery where it existed, and pledged to suspend the activities of the federal government temporarily in areas of hostility. However, he also took a firm stance against secession and the seizure of federal property. The government, insisted Lincoln, would “hold, occupy, and possess” its property and collect its taxes. He closed his remarks with an eloquent reminder of the nation’s common heritage:

“In your hand, my fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath in Heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to preserve, protect, and defend it… We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearthstone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

Also on March 4, 1861, the Confederate Congress adopted a first national flag.

Confederate 1st National Flag 1

This flag is depicted with varying numbers of stars – originally adopted with seven stars, by December 1861, a version with thirteen stars was flying.

Confederate 1st National Flag 2

Below is the current Georgia flag.

Georgia Current State Flag

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