The blog.

17
Sep

How Asian-American Voters Went From Republican To Democratic | Georgia Public Broadcasting

“Asian-Americans tend to have progressive positions on things like taxes, on things like preserving social safety net, supporting the Affordable Care Act,” said [UC Riverside Professor Karthick] Ramakrishnan. Asian-Americans, he added, “including wealthy Asian-Americans, support policies that tend to be more in line with the Democratic Party than the Republican Party.”

But Ramakrishnan said it wasn’t always that way. The Asian-American political conversion started during Bill Clinton’s presidency because of a deliberate effort to court Asian-Americans.

“There’s a big shift that happens there,” said Ramakrishnan. “The Democratic Party is changing itself. It is portraying itself as a centrist party with respect to economic policy, and it is also trying to see itself as ‘big tent’ kind of party.”

During the George W. Bush administration, the leftist Asian tilt continued.

“The most likely explanation there is the kind of exclusionary rhetoric after 9/11 with the Patriot Act and racial profiling of South Asians,” said Ramakrishnan. “Many South Asians I know personally who might have been sympathetic to the Republican Party were starting to have second thoughts.”

via How Asian-American Voters Went From Republican To Democratic | Georgia Public Broadcasting.

17
Sep

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for September 17, 2015

Because of urgent space limitations, all dog and cat adoptions are $10 this month at Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Gwinnett Rusty

Rusty is a male Boxer mix who is especially urgent – as an owner surrender, he has no waiting period before he will be euthanized to provide space. He is described as “a Love Bug.”

Here’s a video of Rusty from the shelter.

Gwinnett 47037

Number 47037 (Pen 118) is a 6-year old female Chocolate Labrador Retriever who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Gwinnett 47063

Number 47063 (Pen 237) is a 4-year old female Pug who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Gwinnett 46980

Number 46980 (Pen 126) is a 6-year old female Yellow Labrador Retriever who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

16
Sep

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for September 16, 2015

CPR Puppies

Yesterday, Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah took in seven tiny puppies whose mother had died. For rescues, the decision to take motherless-puppies is usually a snap decision as the puppies require constant care and won’t survive without it.

CPR is in immediate need of puppy formula and other supplies. Click here for their Amazon.com wishlist. You can donate online here.

You may also pick up locally and drop off at Animal House at Live Oak Kennels on Thomas Ave in Savannah, or email [email protected] for a volunteer to do a pick up.

CPR Dixie

Dixie is a one-year old female Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

CPR Clancy

Clancy is a 15-year old female Dachshund who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

Lady

Lady is a 1.5 year old Treeing Walker Hound/Husky Mix female who is available for adoption from Coastal Pet Rescue in Savannah, GA.

 

 

16
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 16, 2015

The Mayflower left Plymouth, England, for the New World on September 16, 1620. Thirty-five of 102 passengers were members of the English Separatist Church seeking religious freedom from the Church of England. Originally aiming to reach Virginia, Mayflower eventually landed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

A single pistol shot on September 16, 1920 opened former Cherokee land in Oklahoma to white settlers in a “land run” to claim property.

The original stimulus act was announced to bring $70 million in federal money to Georgia to build roads and public buildings on September 16, 1933.

On September 16, 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Selective Service and Training Act requiring males 26-35 years of age to register for the draft. On the same day, Sam Rayburn of Texas was elected Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and would go on to hold the post for 17 years total, the longest tenure of any Speaker.

R.E.M. and Gregg Allman were among the inductees into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame on September 16, 2006.

Georgia Politics

Yesterday, Fayette County District Five voters elected the second African-American County Commissioner, to the seat vacated by the first. Winner Charles Rousseau took 70% of the vote, besting Angela Bean (20%) and Peyton Riley (10%).

DeKalb County Solicitor General Sherry Boston will run for District Attorney in 2016, presumably taking on incumbent Robert James. From Greg Bluestein of the AJC,

“Because our current District Attorney has not stopped the corruption, I’m announcing today my campaign for that office,” Boston said in prepared remarks. “He has not aggressively pursued corruption in DeKalb government. I will.”

“The District Attorney must stop hiding his own documents, comply with open records requests and hold himself to the same standard as any other elected official.  His recent efforts are too little and too late.  It’s time for honest leadership from the District Attorney’s office, and I’ll bring that.”

The 2016 race for House District 123 in Augusta and Columbia County is getting crowded already as Mark Newton became the third announced GOP candidate.

Flanked by civic leaders including former mayor Deke Copenhaver and state transportation board member Don Grantham, Mark Newton announced his campaign as a leader and “bridge builder,” representing parts of Richmond and Columbia counties in District 123.

Newton joins former Augusta mayor Bob Young and attorney Wright McLeod in seeking the seat, which comes open when Barbara Sims retires next year.

Tonight as you watch the GOP Presidential debate, you may see something new if you’re following Twitter: cashtags.

[Twitter] teamed up with Square to enable anyone in the US to make a donation directly to a US candidate through a Tweet, starting today. This is the fastest, easiest way to make an online donation, and the most effective way for campaigns to execute tailored digital fundraising, in real time, on the platform where Americans are already talking about the 2016 election and the issues they are passionate about.

When you see a Tweet containing a candidate’s $Cashtag and hit the “contribute” button, the Tweet will enable you to select a donation amount and add your debit card and FEC required information.

You’ll then have the option to Tweet the candidate’s $Cashtag to your followers or return to where you were in Twitter.

Chatham Area Transit has hired Squires Patton Boggs as their federal lobbying firm. Former First Congressional District Rep. Jack Kingston works at Squires.

Kingston’s firm was one of five to bid for the advocacy role and was rated highest when CAT officials considered costs, the proposed work plan, staffing and project organization and past performance, according to CAT agenda documents.

However, the $144,000 proposed by Squire Patton Boggs exceeds CAT’s budget for advocacy services by $36,000 and will require further negotiation.

CAT board member Helen Stone pointed out that federal laws will initially limit Kingston from lobbying on the transit system’s behalf. Once a congressman leaves office, they are required to wait one year before they are allowed to lobby their former colleagues directly.

Even so, Reese said, Squire Patton Boggs is “uniquely qualified” to handle CAT’s business.

“They have an area of specialty in transit,” he reported to the board Tuesday.

Gambling on Georgia

Yesterday, a House Committee began studying the issue of gambling in Georgia. From the Macon Telegraph,

he $1 billion that the Georgia lottery aims to raise for education this year would be a record haul, but lottery cash buys less college than it used to.

The gap has state lawmakers’ attention, and some are pushing for allowing casinos and horse racing as a way to prop up HOPE Scholarship funding.

“Our marching orders are pretty simple. It’s to look at those proposals, study the economic and social issues around (casinos and horse racing),” said state Rep. Matt Ramsey, R-Peachtree City, opening two days of state House and Senate committee hearings on gaming and the HOPE Scholarship, which started in Atlanta this week.

If the committee members come up with a consensus, they will make recommendations in time for the legislative session in January. So far, there are two major proposals on the table.

Georgia could issue licenses for up to six casinos, as long as they are spread throughout the state, approved by local voters and pay 12 percent of gross revenue to the state each year, according to language in House Bill 677, a measure brought by state Rep. Ron Stephens, R-Savannah. A Senate committee has approved a separate measure, Senate Resolution 135, by state Rep. Brandon Beach, R-Alpharetta, to allow horse racing and betting.

Legislators also discussed whether the Georgia Lottery could make larger payout to fund the HOPE Scholarship, according to Walter Jones of Morris News.

Legislators seeking more revenue for the HOPE Scholarship probed Lottery Corp. executives Monday about cutting costs or reducing prizes.

During a joint meeting of the temporary committees created by the House and Senate to study the issue, lawmakers are looking for ways to address the shrinking share of tuition that the scholarships cover. One avenue is to increase the available money from the existing sources, and another would be to find new sources by legalizing casinos and betting on horse races.

The scholarships are funded by profits generated by the Georgia Lottery Corp., owned by the state. While the annual payments to the scholarship fund have usually increased every year since the program’s creation in 1993, tuition costs have risen faster.

The corporation’s CEO, Debbie Alford, said profits have shrunk from 36 percent in 1995 to 24.8 percent this year because customers are more interested in the scratch-off games with the larger, instant prizes than the more profitable games based on drawings.

Senate Majority Leader Bill Cowsert, R-Athens, challenged her.

“What keeps coming back to me is the fact that the lottery is compelled by law to return 35 percent to education,” he said, pointing to the state law establishing the lottery after voters approved it in 1992.

Events

Debate Watch Parties tonight:

7th District GAGOP at Suwanee Park Tavern, 340 Town Center Ave., Suwanee, GA 30024.

Cherokee Republican Party at Gameday Fresh Grill, 2990 Eagle Dr, Woodstock, GA 30189.

Atlanta Young Republicans and Cobb County YRs at Hudson Grille Midtown, 942 Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, GA 30309.

On Thursday, Young Professionals for DeLoach will hold a social event at Soho South Cafe at 18 W. Liberty Street in Savannah.

DeLoach Invite small

This Saturday, the Jeb Bush campaign will host a tailgate at the UGA-USC game.

Jeb Tailgate

Click here to get your free tickets.

GAGOP Chairmans Dinner

The Georgia Republican Party will hold a major fundraiser on Monday, October 5, 2015 at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center in Atlanta.

15
Sep

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for September 15, 2015

Xena

Xena is an adult female Boxer mix who is available for adoption from the Humane Society of Houston County in Warner Robins, GA.

A fun and beautiful princess! Xena is a 5-7 year old mixed breed girl who was the mother of our Gilligan’s Island puppies. She is a medium-sized gal at 26 pounds and will make a great companion; just look at that smile! She is being treated for heartworms and is ready for a life with the best care and lots of love. Xena loves to be around people and a loyal friend; she has been waiting far too long for her forever family. She enjoys leash walking, tearing up stuffed animals, giving kisses, and chewing bones.

Zeus

Zeus is a low-rider Basset Hound and Boxer mix adult male who is available for adoption from the Humane Society of Houston County in Warner Robins, GA.

So handsome! Zeus is a 5-7 year old mixed breed fellow who was the father of our Gilligan’s Island puppies. He is a medium-sized guy at 30 pounds and will make a great companion. He has been treated for heartworms and is ready for a life with the best care and lots of love. Zeus loves to be around people and a loyal friend.

Charity

Charity is a young, 6-month old female Shepherd and Husky mix (or maybe some Hound blood) who is available for adoption from Warner Robins Animal Control in Warner Robins, GA.

Charity is a sweet, submissive girl – shy, but willing to trust. A true gem.

15
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 15, 2015

Georgia and American History

James Oglethorpe arrived at Augusta on September 12, 1739.

The Second Continental Congress opened in Philadelphia on September 13, 1775; Georgia was represented by Archibald Bulloch, Lyman Hall,  John Houstoun, and John Zubly.

French troops arrived near Savannah to prepare for a siege against British forces there on September 12, 1779.

On September 13, 1788, the Confederation Congress voted to implement the Constitution and authorized states to elect Senators and Representatives and called the first Presidential election, with selection of presidential electors in the states to be held on January 7, 1789, and February 4, 1789 as the day electors would cast their ballots.

Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” on September 14, 1814.

On September 15, 1831, Dr. Samuel Worcester and Dr. Elizur Butler – missionaries – were tried in a Lawrenceville courtroom for living as white people among the Cherokee and refusing to take an oath of loyalty to Georgia, convicted and sentenced to hard labor. Some historians refer to this case, which went as high as the United States Supreme Court on appeal, as the beginning of the events that led to the forced removal of the Cherokee people from Georgia on the “Trail of Tears.”

HMS Beagle, carrying Charles Darwin, arrived at the Gallapagos Islands on September 15, 1835.

On September 14, 1885, Georgia Governor Henry McDaniel signed legislation granting up to 200 acres in Fulton and DeKalb Counties to the federal government to be used in the constuction of Fort McPherson, which was named after Union Maj. Gen. James McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.

On September 14, 1901, President William McKinley died of an infection from gunshot wounds suffered eight days earlier.

On September 15, 1904, Wilbur Wright made the first in-flight turn in an airplane.

The first two women to enter the Georgia General Assembly, Viola Ross Napier of Bibb County and Atlanta Constitution reporter Bessie Kempton of Fulton County, were elected on September 13, 1922.

Early on the morning of September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls.

On September 15, 1996, the Texas Rangers retired #34 in honor of the most dominant pitcher in professional baseball history, Nolan Ryan.

Georgia Politics

Today, voters in Fayette County Commission District Five will vote in a special election to fill a vacancy.

Candidates in the race include two Republicans, Angela Bean and Peyton Riley, along with one Democrat, Charles Rousseau.

If a runoff is needed, it will take place Oct. 13.

Earlier this election season, a lawsuit was filed in federal court over whether the election would be open to all voters countywide, but a federal judge ordered that only voters within district five may vote.

Qualifying is open in the Special Election for House District 122, formerly held by State Rep. Ben Harbin.

[Secretary of State Brian] Kemp set candidate qualifying for Monday, September 14th through Wednesday, September 16th. Qualifying on Monday will run from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.; on Tuesday from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.; and on Wednesday from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon.

Candidates will qualify in the Elections Division of the Office of Secretary of State, located at 802 West Tower, 2 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, in Atlanta. The qualifying fee is $400.

The election for Georgia Senate District 43 will occur in portions of DeKalb County, Rockdale County, and Newton County to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Ronald Ramsey. The election for Georgia House of Representatives District 122 will occur in Columbia County to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Ben Harbin.

The elections are non-partisan special elections with no party primaries. However, each candidate’s party affiliation, if any, will be listed on the ballot. Run-off elections, if needed, will be held Tuesday, December 1, 2015.

House District 122 will host at least four candidates, assuming the announced candidates make it to qualifying.

Four candidates have already announced their intentions to seek the post: Pat Goodwin, a former chairwoman of the Columbia County Repub­­lican Party and the Co­­lum­bia County Convention and Visitors Bureau; Jodi Lott, a registered nurse and co-owner of Evans Rehabili­tation Services; Joe Mullins, a developer and entertainment promoter; and Mack Taylor, a lawyer in private practice who resigned his seat on the Columbia County Commission in July to pursue the office.

Taylor’s resignation triggered the need for a special election to fill the commission District 3 seat, which is also set for Nov. 3. Five candidates have qualified to run in that race.

Among the candidates in the Special Election for Senate District 43 will be Stan Williams of Conyers.

A graduate of Knoxville College in Tennessee, Williams’ career includes 25 years of service with IBM in various management positions. In 1994 he joined the Clinton Administration, serving until September 2000 as the Southeastern Region representative for Education Secretary Richard Riley. More recently, he served as political advisor and legislative aide for Sen. Ramsey.

Joining Williams in the race will be Diane Daniels-Adoma, running as a Republican.

In 2014 Daniels-Adoma challenged Rep. Dorothea “Dee” Dawkins-Haigler, a Democrat from Lithonia, in the Democratic primary for the state House District 91 seat, which includes portions of Rockdale and DeKalb counties. Dawkins-Haigler won that race in the May primary with Daniels-Adoma collecting approximately one-third of the votes cast. Dawkins-Haigler won last fall’s General Election with no opposition.

Since then, Daniels-Adoma declared that she is switching parties and is running for the Senate office as a Republican, though the special election is nonpartisan. District 43 is heavily Democratic and encompasses most of Rockdale County, nearly one-third of Newton County and a portion of DeKalb.

“In the race against Dee I was painted as a Republican in Democrat clothing,” Daniels-Adoma said. “Upon examining my political stances, I realized that my detractors were correct on that one point. Half of my friends and family have been Republicans for many years.”

Daniels-Adoma said she made the decision to switch parties last spring.

“I realized that I really do align with the convervative party. It was an ‘aha’ moment. I believe in the right to bear arms. Republicans think when government gets too big, it’s a threat to our freedom. We believe in a hand-up rather than a handout. … My philosophy is not anti-government — it’s all about managing government and holding people accountable.”

Former Republican Rockdale County Commissioner JaNice Van Ness will also run as will Angela Moore, aka “Miss Angela,” who ran for Secretary of State in 2009.

Candidates for Mayor and City Council in Brookhaven have answered a series of questions on their campaigns from the Brookhaven Post. As a voter in District Three, where incumbent City Council member Bates Mattison is unopposed, he took the time to answer the same questions, and I both respect and appreciate that.

Dr. Ben Carson spoke to Republicans in Aiken, South Carolina on Saturday.

As the Feb. 20 South Carolina primary approaches, Carson, who said he visited the Aiken area many times before his presidential aspirations, sees the state as a future bastion of support.

“There are a lot of people here with common sense,” he said. “The more I come and speak to people and expose them to my ideals the more it will resonate, and God will take care of the rest.”

He said that while many see his lack of political experience as a disadvantage, it’s actually liberating.

“To run as a non-politician is less stressful because politicians have to run around with their finger up in the air seeing which way the wind is blowing and what is politically expedient,” Carson said. “I don’t have to do that. All I have to do is tell the truth.”

Ohio Governor John Kasich announced Georgia leadership for his Presidential campaign.

Georgia Senate Majority Leader Bill Cowsert, State Senator Fran Millar, former State Party Chair Rusty Paul, and John Watson – who served as chief of staff to former Gov. Sonny Perdue — endorsed Ohio Governor John Kasich for President. Cowsert and Watson will now serve as State Co-Chairs, while Sen. Millar and Mayor Paul will join Kasich for America’s Georgia Statewide Leadership Team along with three additional Georgian Mayors who also endorsed Kasich today.

Also [Monday], three Georgian Mayors and additional Republican activists endorsed Gov. Kasich, and will all join Georgia’s Kasich for America’s steering committee:

City of Dunwoody Mayor Mike Davis
City of LaGrange Mayor Jim Thornton
City of Tybee Island Mayor Jason Buelterman
John Stoj
Dan Israel
Mark Middleton
William Woodall
Ashley Jenkins
Steve Schultz

“In state after state, region after region, I continue to be humbled by the support we are seeing and the momentum we are gaining,” said Kasich. “Georgia is an incredibly important state, and I am grateful to have such respected, experienced Georgia Republicans stand up and express their support for my vision for this country.  The team of Cowsert, Millar, Paul and Watson represent exactly what you want as you build an operation in a state – strength, experience and proven political success.”

Governor Nathan Deal announced that state revenues for August were up 13.6% over the same period last year.

Georgia’s new consolidated gas tax and hotel and motel fee helped drive a 13.6 percent year-to-year increase in state revenue last month, Gov. Nathan Deal’s office announced on Monday.

The governor’s office said tax reforms created earlier this year by House Bill 170 produced $59.5 million in transportation revenues in August. Those reforms included the state gas tax, a new annual highway impact fee for vehicles which weigh more than 15,500 pounds and a new fee for hotel stays.

Proceeds collected from the gas tax and the hotel and motel fee made up the lion’s share of that funding.

Motor fuel tax revenues alone increased by 43.6 million, or 43.5 percent, from 100.3 million in August 2014 to $144 million last month, according to figures released by the governor’s office. Drivers pay 26 cents for every gallon of unleaded gasoline and 29 cents per gallon for diesel fuel. The new single fuel tax replaced a system of excise and prepaid local and state taxes.

Meanwhile, the new hotel and motel fee generated $14.9 million in revenues last month. The $5 nightly fee applies to hotel stays which last 30 days or less.

A new highway impact fee also generated about $844,000 in revenue. Drivers of vehicles which weigh between 15,500 and 26,000 pounds pay a $50 fee while owners of vehicles which weigh more than that must pay a $100 fee.

Local opposition to President Obama’s appointment of DeKalb County State Court Judge Dax Lopez has spread, according to the Marietta Daily Journal.

Northeast Cobb Commissioner JoAnn Birrell has written to U.S. Sens. Johnny Isakson and David Perdue (both R-Ga.) strongly urging them to oppose President Obama’s attempt to appoint DeKalb State Court Judge Dax Lopez — and 11-year board member of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials — to a federal judgeship. Cobb Sheriff Neil Warren sent the senators a similar letter last month.

Cobb County Commission Chair Tim Lee continues to trade barbs with County Commissioner Bob Ott.

Warner Robins officials will consider whether to create a Tax Allocation District (TAD) to attract a hotel and conference center near City Hall.

United States Senator David Perdue visited David A. Perdue Primary School, named after his father, in Warner Robins.

He spoke to second-graders in the gym at David A. Perdue Primary School in Warner Robins, fielding questions about politics and his own personal story.

“I read everything I can get my hands on, and that’s how you learn,” Perdue, R-Ga., told the students.

The senator added that reading and learning would make the students more informed when the time comes for them to vote and help make other decisions.

The worst part of being a senator, he said, was missing time with his family, but the job has its benefits.

“I think the best part of my job is the realization that one senator can make life better for people like you,” he told them.

Perdue said the knowledge and focus he saw from the students made him “optimistic about the future” when they get older.

“The second-graders were phenomenal,” he said. “I’m just so amazed at how well-behaved those second-graders were.”

My first thought when I saw the Macon Telegraph photos of Sen. Perdue talking to the second graders was, “he’s already filming a spot for his re-election.”

Speaking of local control of schools, DeKalb County Commissioner Nancy Jester takes on the issue in an Op-Ed for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Our state constitution mandates that, “the provision of an adequate public education for the citizens shall be a primary obligation of the State of Georgia.”  Additionally, the constitution limits the number of school districts to 180 (159 county districts plus 21 grandfathered city districts).

Georgia’s leaders and policy makers should be asking if the very school district structure that is hard coded into our state constitution is serving us well. They should be seeking to maximize student achievement and be concerned with the return on investment for each dollar of public spending. Are academic results maximized and expenses kept in check with properly sized school districts?

Now, no matter what circumstances change, we are locked into the same 180 delivery vehicles – school districts – for education. There is clear and compelling evidence that educational outcomes for students and the cost to deliver education are affected by the size of the school district in which they attend.

So, what does the evidence tell us? Based on studies from multiple states (Washington, Ohio, California, Michigan, and Nevada) we know that larger school districts have a negative effect on student achievement and produce higher costs per pupil than smaller districts. The effects on achievement are even more profound for students in poverty.

In the next legislative session, there will be an effort to allow Georgia to form smaller districts by allowing cities to create new school districts.  I view this as one important step in the right direction when dealing with school district size.

 

14
Sep

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for September 14, 2015

James Oglethorpe arrived at Augusta on September 12, 1739.

The Second Continental Congress opened in Philadelphia on September 13, 1775; Georgia was represented by Archibald Bulloch, Lyman Hall,  John Houstoun, and John Zubly.

French troops arrived near Savannah to prepare for a siege against British forces there on September 12, 1779.

On September 13, 1788, the Confederation Congress voted to implement the Constitution and authorized states to elect Senators and Representatives and called the first Presidential election, with selection of presidential electors in the states to be held on January 7, 1789, and February 4, 1789 as the day electors would cast their ballots.

Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” on September 14, 1814.

On September 14, 1885, Georgia Governor Henry McDaniel signed legislation granting up to 200 acres in Fulton and DeKalb Counties to the federal government to be used in the constuction of Fort McPherson, which was named after Union Maj. Gen. James McPherson, who was killed in the Battle of Atlanta in 1864.

On September 14, 1901, President William McKinley died of an infection from gunshot wounds suffered eight days earlier.

The first two women to enter the Georgia General Assembly, Viola Ross Napier of Bibb County and Atlanta Constitution reporter Bessie Kempton of Fulton County, were elected on September 13, 1922.

Georgia Politics

Tomorrow, voters in Fayette County Commission District Five will vote in a special election to fill a vacancy.

Candidates in the race include two Republicans, Angela Bean and Peyton Riley, along with one Democrat, Charles Rousseau.

If a runoff is needed, it will take place Oct. 13.

Earlier this election season, a lawsuit was filed in federal court over whether the election would be open to all voters countywide, but a federal judge ordered that only voters within district five may vote.

 

14
Sep

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for September 14, 2015

Tyler

Tyler is a young male Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption at Augusta Animal Services Augusta, GA.

Richard

Richard is an adult male Labrador Retriever and Spaniel mix who is available for adoption at Augusta Animal Services Augusta, GA.

Lacey

Lacey is a young female Labrador Retriever mix who is available for adoption at Augusta Animal Services Augusta, GA.

11
Sep

The Marietta Daily Journal – Isakson Perdue blast Dems for blocking Iran deal vote

WASHINGTON — After Senate Democrats voted to uphold a nuclear deal with Iran on Thursday, both of Georgia’s Republican Senators blasted their colleagues on the other side of the aisle for not allowing an up-or-down vote on a disapproval resolution for the agreement.

The disapproval resolution fell two votes short of the 60 needed to move forward as Democratic and independent senators banded together against it. Although House Republicans continued to pursue eleventh-hour strategies to derail the international accord, the outcome in the Senate guaranteed that the disapproval legislation would not reach Obama’s desk.

“I am appalled that Senate Democrats are choosing to keep the people of the United States in the dark on where they stand on Iran by blocking an up-or-down vote on the president’s dangerous agreement with Iran,” said Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia.

Isakson said he rejects the nuclear agreement with Iran and will vote against it if given the chance.

“The United States has negotiated away all of its leverage to enforce accountability by Iran by releasing existing sanctions and removing the ability to impose sanction in the future,” Isakson said in a statement. “This is not the end of this debate. This is a bad deal for America; it’s a bad deal for Israel and the world. It’s a bad deal for my children and grandchildren. I reject the agreement on its face and will continue to fight against it.”

Sen. David Perdue, R-Georgia, said he was “outraged” by Senate Democrats’ actions to block a vote on the disapproval resolution.

“There is a bipartisan majority in this body against the deal, yet only Democrats are blocking an up-or-down vote. … If Iran’s Supreme Leader is demanding Iran’s parliament should have a vote, at the very least, the American people deserve the same. I will continue to fight to dismantle this deal and stop a nuclear Iran,” Perdue said in a statement.

via The Marietta Daily Journal – Isakson Perdue blast Dems for blocking Iran deal vote.

11
Sep

Metro Atlanta schools add security after rumored Sept. 11 threats | www.ajc.com

Several metro Atlanta schools will have an increased police presence Friday as a precaution after learning of rumored threats, some posted on social media, tied to Friday’s anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Gwinnett County schools spokesman Bernard Watson said Thursday more patrol units will be at North Gwinnett High on Friday.

“We are aware of the social media talk about threats at North Gwinnett High School and we have looked into them and have not been able to find any proof that the threats are real…” Watson said in a statement. He said parents have been notified about the rumors.

via Metro Atlanta schools add security after rumored Sept. 11 threats | www.ajc.com.