Eat my BBQ and Impeach Earl Warren

After losing to Carl Sanders in a bid to regain the Governor’s Mansion, Marvin Griffin remarked that some of the people who ate his barbecue did not vote for him. Despite his best efforts, his 1962 campaign was hampered by allegations of corruption from his first go-round. While Griffin was never indicted, the allegations of corruption proved significant enough to derail future political aspirations. Regardless of whether or not Griffin was guilty of corruption, his tenure as Governor is remembered for fiery rhetoric and bold actions. For instance, March 13, 1957, when Governor Griffin signed a joint resolution by the General Assembly calling for the impeachment of several Justices the United States Supreme Court.

There is a backstory: Griffin first ran for Governor on a segregationist platform in 1954. Many believed Griffin to be the hand-picked successor of Herman Talmadge, having served as Lt. Governor under Talmadge. Right before the campaign season kicked off, the United States Supreme Court ruled that segregation was unconstitutional. Griffin—like many others—promised to protect segregated schools, no matter what any federal judge decreed.

Griffin was ultimately successful in the Democratic primary and carried a majority of the county-unit votes, ensuring his election as Governor. And we often are reminded that it was under Governor Griffin that Georgia adopted the “confederate battle flag” as part of Georgia’s state flag in 1956. But Griffin, perhaps as an attempt to defuse integration, was also responsible for increasing spending to black public schools, increasing pay for black teachers, and generally improving conditions for black students in Georgia.

Many of his supporters wanted Griffin to willfully violate federal ores requiring desegregation. The prospect of sitting in jail did not appeal to the Governor. Thus, he declined to directly interfere with the process of desegregation as many of his supporters requested.

But that wouldn’t stop Griffin, or the General Assembly, for calling for the impeachment of Chief Justice Warren and several Associate Justices of the Supreme Court. The join-resolution also called for Georgia’s congressional delegation to institute formal impeachment proceedings against the Justices. Through-out the South, “Impeach Earl Warren” signs were proudly displayed.

Officially, the joint resolution was titled “The Impeachment of Certain U.S. Supreme Court Justices”, and cited that several Justices were believed to be furthering and enabling communism by “usurping the congressional power to make law in violation of Article I, Sections I and 8”; for “violations of Sections 3 and 5 of the 14th Amendment”; and for “nullification of the 10th Amendment of the Constitution.” Apparently, no one in Washington got the memo. Despite Griffin, the General Assembly, and a host of Georgians being upset about the Supreme Court’s ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, none of the Justices were impeached.

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for March 13, 2014

Gwinnett37128

37128 was found with a gunshot wound, and has been treated, but unless he finds a foster or rescue home by 10 AM today, will likely be euthanized. He is at the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter. If you wish to help him, please immediately email: jaclyn.nguyen@gwinnettcounty.com.

Gwinnett35456

36456 is a Pit Bull male who was found stray and is friendly. He has been vetted and is ready to go to a foster or adoptive home; he has been staying at Gwinnett County Animal Shelter for more than a month.

GwinnettFlattieThis beautiful male Flat-Coated Retriever is friendly and in need of a home. He is available for adoption from Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for March 13, 2014

On March 3, 1736, the Spanish Governor of Florida complained to Georgia’s James Oglethorpe about English settlements and forts in areas claimed by Spain.

Several weeks ago, it was announced at an academic conference that Fort Caroline, built by the French in 1564, had been located in Georgia rather than Florida as long believed.

The site is on an island at the mouth of the Altamaha River, two miles southeast of the city of Darien, they said.

“This is the oldest fortified settlement in the present United States,” historian and Florida State University alumnus Fletcher Crowe said. “This fort is older than St. Augustine, considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited city in America. It’s older than the Lost Colony of Virginia by 21 years; older than the 1607 fort of Jamestown by 45 years; and predates the landing of the Pilgrims in Massachusetts in 1620 by 56 years.”

To make the discovery, Crowe flew to Paris and conducted research at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, the French equivalent of the U.S. Library of Congress, where he found a number of 16th-century maps that pinpointed the location of Fort Caroline.

Some of the maps were in 16th-century French, some in Latin, some in Spanish, and some were even in English, he found.

Crowe was able to match French maps from the 16th to 18th centuries of what is today the southeastern coast of the United States with modern charts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Now, the Jean Shorts State is fighting back, claiming credit for the discovery after having refuted earlier reports by Georgia-based archaeologists to have located the site on the Altamaha River.

On March 13, 1868, the first impeachment trial of a United States President began in the Senate. President Andrew Johnson was impeached by the House for allegations based on his Reconstruction policies that allegedly violated federal law.

Sworn in as president after Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865, President Johnson enacted a lenient Reconstruction policy for the defeated South, including almost total amnesty to ex-Confederates, a program of rapid restoration of U.S.-state status for the seceded states, and the approval of new, local Southern governments, which were able to legislate “black codes” that preserved the system of slavery in all but name. The Republican-dominated Congress greatly opposed Johnson’s Reconstruction program and passed the “Radical Reconstruction” by repeatedly overriding the president’s vetoes. Under the Radical Reconstruction, local Southern governments gave way to federal military rule, and African-American men in the South were granted the constitutional right to vote.

In March 1867, in order further to weaken Johnson’s authority, Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act over his veto. The act prohibited the president from removing federal office holders, including Cabinet members, who had been confirmed by the Senate, without the consent of the Senate.

On March 13, 1957, Governor Marvin Griffin signed a joint resolution by the Georgia General Assembly purporting to impeach United State Chief Justice Earl Warren and associate justices Hugo Black, William O. Douglas, Thomas Clark, Felix Frankfurter, and Stanley Reed, and calling on Congress to impeach the Justices.

From Ron Daniels,

After losing to Carl Sanders in a bid to regain the Governor’s Mansion, Marvin Griffin remarked that some of the people who ate his barbecue did not vote for him. Despite his best efforts, his 1962 campaign was hampered by allegations of corruption from his first go-round. While Griffin was never indicted, the allegations of corruption proved significant enough to derail future political aspirations. Regardless of whether or not Griffin was guilty of corruption, his tenure as Governor is remembered for fiery rhetoric and bold actions. For instance, March 13, 1957, when Governor Griffin signed a joint resolution by the General Assembly calling for the impeachment of several Justices the United States Supreme Court.

There is a backstory: Griffin first ran for Governor on a segregationist platform in 1954. Many believed Griffin to be the hand-picked successor of Herman Talmadge, having served as Lt. Governor under Talmadge. Right before the campaign season kicked off, the United States Supreme Court ruled that segregation was unconstitutional. Griffin—like many others—promised to protect segregated schools, no matter what any federal judge decreed.

Under the Gold Dome Today

SENATE MEETING CALENDAR

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM EDUCATION & YOUTH 307 CLOB
8:00 AM INSURANCE & LABOR -CANCELLED
8:00 AM PUBLIC SAFETY – CANCELLED
8:00 AM HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES MEZZ
8:30 AM REGULATED INDUSTRIES & UTILITIES 310 CLOB
9:00 AM BANKING & FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS – CANCELLED
9:00 AM NATURAL RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT 450 CAP
9:30 AM FINANCE Subcommittee 123 CAP
10:00 AM HIGHER EDUCATION 125 CAP
10:00 AM VETERANS, MILITARY & HOMELAND SECURITY MEZZ
10:00 AM STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENTAL OPERATIONS 310 CLOB
10:00 AM TRANSPORTATION 318 CLOB
10:30 AM FINANCE MEZZ
11:00 AM JUDICIARY 307 CLOB
11:30 AM INSURANCE & LABOR 450 CAP

SENATE RULES CALENDAR

HB 128: Georgia Downtown Renaissance Investment Tax Credit Act; enact (ECD-47th) Peake-141st

HB 511: State employees’ health insurance plan; pilot program to provide coverage for bariatric surgical procedures for treatment and management of obesity; provide (Substitute) (H&HS-45th) Dempsey-13th

HB 549: Water pollution; establish water emergency response procedures (NR&E-4th) Burns-159th

HB 646: Magistrates Retirement Fund of Georgia; part-time chief magistrates may become members of such fund; provide (RET-24th) Fleming-121st

HB 714: Labor; determination of eligibility for unemployment benefits of certain people performing certain services; provide changes (Substitute) (I&L-40th) Hamilton-24th

HB 741: Water resources; issuance of sludge land application permits; revise certain requirements (Substitute) (NR&E-51st) Tanner-9th

HB 742: Coweta Judicial Circuit; superior courts; provide for seventh judge (JUDYNC-29th) Nix-69th

HB 750: Banking and finance; exemption to mortgage loan originator licensing requirements for employees of certain nonprofit corporations; provide (B&FI-6th) Frye-118th

HB 782: Facilitating Business Rapid Response to State Declared Disasters Act of 2014; enact (FIN-9th) Williamson-115th

HB 794: Compact for a Balanced Budget; adopt (RULES-6th) Braddock-19th

HB 825: Alcoholic beverages; fruit growers licensed as farm wineries obtain license authorizing production of distilled spirits and fortified wines pursuant to certain conditions; permit (AG&CA-11th) Houston-170th

HB 863: Crimes and offenses; cruelty to animals and aggravated cruelty to animals; change provisions (Substitute) (JUDYNC-23rd) Golick-40th

HB 881: Special license plates; Grady Health Foundation; provide (Substitute) (PUB SAF-53rd) Epps-144th

HB 883: Georgia merchant acquirer limited purpose banks; correct cross-references; provide (B&FI-49th) Strickland-111th

HB 908: Tire disposal restrictions; extend sunset date for tire fees (NR&E-17th) Riley-50th

HB 930: General Assembly; adopt standards and instructions for Article V convention delegates; provisions (RULES-46th) Barr-103rd

HB 943: Cancer Treatment Fairness Act; enact (Substitute) (I&L-45th) Hawkins-27th

HB 947: Labor and industrial relations; payment of wages by credit to prepaid debit card; provisions (I&L-25th) Clark-98th

HB 965: Georgia 9-1-1 Medical Amnesty Law; enact (Substitute) (H&HS-45th) Cooper-43rd

HB 978: Georgia International and Maritime Trade Center Authority; change provisions relating to membership (Floor Substitute) (SLGO-2nd) Stephens-164th

HB 982: Financial institutions; repeal Articles 4 and 4A; enact new Articles 4 and 4A; provisions (B&FI-23rd) Williamson-115th

HB 998: Medical scholarships; revise provisions relating to scholarships and loans (H&HS-11th) Hatchett-150th

HOUSE MEETING CALENDAR

TBD FLOOR SESSION (LD 38) HOUSE
8:30 AM – 9:00 AM STATE PROPERTIES 417 CAP- Conference Room
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM RULES 341 CAP
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM WAYS & MEANS 606 CLOB

HOUSE RULES CALENDAR – not available at time of publication

Yesterday Under the Gold Dome – Thunderdome Edition

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Yesterday afternoon, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee held the first “Thunderdome” Meeting of the year. Instead of “two men enter, one man leaves,” it became “two bills enter, one bill leaves.” And instead of leaving one bill of each matchup dead, the Committee Frankensteined a pair of super-bills.

The first combination is less Frankenstein, more “Master-Blaster.”

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From the AJC:

A Senate-based bid to privatize Georgia’s child welfare system on Thursday may be joined to a high-profile House effort to give the Legislature say-so over Medicaid expansion.

Senator Renee Unterman, R-Buford, on Wednesday said she intended to tie the fates of the two disparate measures together. Her remarks came during a meeting of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee, which she chairs.

SB 350 passed the Senate last month with a 31-18 vote, and would require the Division of Family and Children Services to bid out primary functions such as case management, family preservation and independent living. It was supported by the Senate’s top leadership, including Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, but met resistance in the House this week. The House Judiciary Committee passed a scaled-down version, calling instead for a two-year pilot program.

So Unterman intends to merge her foster care bill with HB 990, which is backed by the House’s top leadership. House Speaker Pro-Tem Jan Jones, R-Milton, House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, and the governor’s floor leader, Rep. Chad Nimmer, R-Blackshear are all co-sponsors. Unterman’s committee is set to discuss the merger Thursday morning.

Tools of the Trade

Next to receive surgical intervention was the Medical CDB (Cannabis) bill by Rep. Allen Peake.

From Jim Galloway’s Political Insider:

by a vote of 51-0, the Republican-controlled Senate passed SB 397, which would require health insurance policies sold in Georgia to cover behavioral therapy for children 6 and under who have been diagnosed with autism. That’s right. A health insurance mandate.

“It’s the right thing to do for Georgia’s children,” said Tim Golden, R-Valdosta, chairman of the same Senate Insurance Committee that is likely to pass out HB 707 today.

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle has also placed his own prestige behind the autism coverage bill, testifying for it in committee – the first time he’s done so in his eight years as president of the Senate.

And Gov. Nathan Deal may have given his sotto voce endorsement. For the first time, the governor’s new budget includes extra cash to make sure insurance policies for state employees include treatment coverage for autism.

Even tea party-types have gotten on board. State Sen. Josh McKoon, R-Columbus, noted that the average public school student costs the state $6,556. Autism nearly triples that price.

“The whole notion that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure comes into play here,” McKoon said. “Yes, the state is mandating this coverage. But the indirect tax that is levied through the mandate – the taxpayer comes out ‘way ahead.”

“Does this increase the cost of doing business? Marginally, it does. And I’m going to own that. But I’ll defend it by saying that the benefit on the back end is well worth it,” McKoon said.

But even with Senate passage, it’s not entirely smooth swimming for this salmon of a bill. State Rep. Richard Smith, R-Columbus, chairman of the House Insurance Committee has shunted S.B. 397 to a “special subcommittee.” And House Rules Chairman John Meadows, R-Calhoun, an insurance salesman, is opposed to the measure.

So Golden has resorted to attaching his autism measure to several House bills in an effort to force a vote in the opposite chamber. On Wednesday, SB 397 was attached to the highly popular bill to legalize medicinal marijuana in Georgia – putting together the two causes that have attracted more moms and dads to the Capitol this session than any other.

Included in the amendments to the bill was an additional approach to dealing with the issue of supply of CBD oil. The new approach: decriminalize possession of CBD oil that was obtained in another state under a procedue legal in that state, as long as the THC (what gets someone high) level is 2% or less.

From the AJC:

Peake has struggled to craft language that creates a safe supply of the oil, which is harvested from the marijuana plant but does not create the high that recreational use of marijuana produces.

Peake said the bill will allow for the state’s research institutions to prepare for the day that federal law is eased to allow the cultivation of the plant for medicinal purposes. In the meantime, those patients will have to travel outside Georgia to find a supply, with Colorado being the most likely source.

The immunity from prosecution provision is designed to protect those who enter Georgia legally with the cannabis oil.

The bill would still limit the number of patients who would qualify for the treatment and require multiple levels of approval before its use is allowed.

From WSB-TV

“So if you’re a mother or father and you’ve gone somewhere out of state to get oil for your child and bring it back, you can be assured that you’re not going to be arrested and not going to have DFCS taking your child away. That’s a big, big step,” said state Rep. Allen Peake.

“To be able to fly out there, get this medication and possibly be able to come home and be back with our families, I mean…. there’s no words right now,” Cox told Geary.

There’s no guarantee the bill will get final approval from the Senate and then the OK from Gov. Nathan Deal.

“We’re living minute to minute with Haleigh. We don’t know how much longer she has,” Cox said.

That’s why Cox says she can’t wait for Georgia lawmakers to act, because Haleigh’s anti-seizure meds are taking their toll.

In order to help get the bill out of the Senate committee Wednesday, Peake said he had to compromise and tack on a Senate bill that would expand insurance coverage for autism.
That could be a huge hurdle to overcome in the House.

HB885_Committee

Rep. Allen Peake (center) spoke to the bill. Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter, a Republican, spoke on behalf of the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Council of Georgia, which consulted on the provisions to decriminalize CBD oil obtained legally in another state. The mother of Haleigh Cox (Jenae Cox, not pictured) also spoke.

If you wish to donate to help Haleigh Cox, please click here. While the fundraiser has met its goal, families like Haleigh’s will constantly be hit with new and unexpected expenses, especially when transporting a medically-fragile child across the country.

After the presentation, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted in favor of HB 885. So, now the bill goes to the Senate floor for a vote. Assuming it passes, far from a foregone conclusion, it will be sent back to the State House for an “Agree-Disagree” vote. This means that the House can vote to accept the Senate changes, at which point the bill is adopted; or the House can “disagree” or “adhere to its position,” setting the stage for a House-Senate conference committee that can either hammer out changes to present to both chambers, or abandon the bill if agreement cannot be found.

And a final touch to the combination of these bills: Senator Unterman changed the bill’s name to the “Kids Care Act,” essentially daring other members to vote against it.

Newt Gingrich endorses John McCallum for Congress

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“Callista and I are proud to endorse John McCallum in his campaign for the U.S. Congress,” said Speaker Gingrich. “I have known John for nearly twenty years, ever since he came to work in my office in 1993 as an unpaid intern. He rose through the ranks and eventually served as my trusted aide on budget, banking, and tax issues during the Contract with America. John understands the legislative process and is ready to go to work for the people of Georgia’s First District on Day One.”

“I am confident that John McCallum will be a principled, effective representative for the people of Georgia’s First District, and I look forward to standing with him as he fights to restore sanity, accountability, and trust in the United States Congress.”

“Heather and I are honored to have Newt and Callista’s support,” said John McCallum. “Under Speaker Gingrich’s leadership, Republicans articulated a bold, conservative agenda for our nation’s future. If America is to remain strong, we must once again pursue positive, proactive solutions that empower individuals, strengthen families, and hold government accountable to the people.”

Here’s my favorite quote from Newt’s endorsement letter,

John met his wife Heather, the first Miss America with a disability, while working in my office in 1995. I take some credit for them meeting, as my running late that day gave them an opportunity to visit with one another.

 

Newt on Chris Christie and Tesla

Yesterday, Newt Gingrich sent out an email discussing New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and New Jersey’s recent executive branch decision to shut down Tesla Motors sales direct to customers in the Garden State. From BloombergBusinessweek:

New Jersey, where Tesla (TSLA) has two company-owned stores, is the latest state to put the kibosh on the carmaker’s direct-to-consumer business model. Pushed by a strong lobby for old-fashioned car dealers, the state’s Motor Vehicle Commission approved a proposal banning direct sales from auto manufacturers and delayed public comment on the issue until after the vote.

The New Jersey dealers griping about Tesla—like every other car seller in the country—are set up as independent businesses with franchise agreements to sell certain brands. Tesla is a rarity among automakers for selling its cars on its own, with no middleman.

Tesla and its customers have been down this road before. Dealers in Texas and Arizona lobbied for the nation’s toughest restrictions on direct sales to consumers, and the success of incumbent dealers in those states seems to be emboldening dealers elsewhere. The anti-Tesla movement is now mobilizing in New York, Minnesota, and Georgia. The next battle could be decided in Ohio, where Tesla officials are scrambling to reach a compromise on a bill that would keep it from expanding beyond its current two stores in the state.

The argument is that a franchise middleman keeps carmakers from fleecing consumers and protects price competition. Car dealerships, however, might have a hard time holding the moral high ground with consumers. Tesla says its pricing is fully transparent and its service record is stellar.

Tesla accused New Jersey Governor Chris Christie of going “outside the legislative process” and fast-tracking a rule change through the Motor Vehicle Commission. “This is an affront to the very concept of a free market,” the company wrote in a blog post.

Gingrich places the Tesla sales model in context, where we can now buy most anything on the internet, and I even have my Grandmother’s favorite ice cream delivered to her assisted living facility via the internet.

In New Jersey, Apple can sell its iPhones directly to customers in its Apple stores. The Gap can sell its blue jeans in every mall. And Starbucks can sell its coffee on every street corner.

But one innovative car company learned yesterday that the state will prohibit it from selling its cars to New Jerseyans in either of its two showrooms there.

The Garden State had been fertile territory for Tesla, the high-end automotive startup that makes the all-electric Model S (which Consumer Reports recently rated the best overall car, period). But the company is crashing up against century-old state laws that require cars to be sold through franchised dealerships like the big manufacturers use.

A recent Wall Street Journalreport made the prison guards’ case for their protection racket loud and clear.

“The focus of the power struggle between [Tesla] and auto dealers is a thicket of state franchise laws, many of which go back to the auto industry’s earliest days when industry pioneer Henry Ford began turning to eager entrepreneurs to help sell his Model T,” it said.

“Dealers say laws passed over the decades to prevent car makers from selling directly to consumers are justified,” it continued, “because without them auto makers could use their economic clout to sell vehicles for less than their independent franchisees.”

So the dealers’ actual argument is that without the restrictions, cars would be substantially less expensive for consumers, because they wouldn’t need to pay the middle man anymore.

How much less expensive might they be? In 2000, an in-depth analysis by Goldman Sachs concluded that selling cars directly to consumers would knock nearly 10 percent off the cost of an average car–a savings of $2,225 for a $26,000 vehicle. Others peg the cost of distribution through dealerships as up to 15 percent of the vehicles’ price.

You can understand why the dealers would want to protect that system, but why would consumers? And just as importantly, why would voters? Why would they tolerate their government deliberately protecting the past and blocking the future–at the public’s expense?

While this may be part of the coming fight over the 2016 Presidential nomination, Newt eventually gets around to the real reason for his email: an offer to sell his and Callista’s books.

Here’s an interesting scenario

Editor Kyle Kondik at Crystal Ball, published by Political Scientist Larry Sabato at the University of Virginia suggests a mouth-watering for political consultants and strageists frightening electoral scenario for 2014.

A post-November runoff if no one gets over 50% here in the general election is possible. Imagine if Georgia and Louisiana went to overtime, with the Senate in the balance? Georgia’s runoff wouldn’t be until Jan. 6, 2015 — after the new Congress will be seated. Hmm…

The recent announcement by the Libertarian Party of Georgia of a U.S. Senate candidate makes it possible that Georgia will require a statewide runoff for U.S. Senate. Remember, it was a 1992 General Election Runoff that gave the Senate seat to Paul Coverdell, over then-incumbent Democrat Wyche Fowler.

 

Newt Gingrich endorses John McCallum for Congress in CD-1

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Conservative leader and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and his wife, Callista, today announced their endorsement of conservative businessman John McCallum, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Congress in Georgia’s First Congressional District. This marks Speaker Gingrich’s first endorsement in Georgia during the current election cycle.

“Callista and I are proud to endorse John McCallum in his campaign for the U.S. Congress,” said Speaker Gingrich. “I have known John for nearly twenty years, ever since he came to work in my office in 1993 as an unpaid intern. He rose through the ranks and eventually served as my trusted aide on budget, banking, and tax issues during the Contract with America. John understands the legislative process and is ready to go to work for the people of Georgia’s First District on Day One.

“John McCallum embodies the American Dream. He is an innovator, entrepreneur, and conservative businessman with a proven track record of service and leadership. John represents a new generation of bold, conservative leaders who are more concerned about winning the future than fighting the partisan political battles of the past.

“I am confident that John McCallum will be a principled, effective representative for the people of Georgia’s First District, and I look forward to standing with him as he fights to restore sanity, accountability, and trust in the United States Congress.”

“Heather and I are honored to have Newt and Callista’s support,” said John McCallum. “Under Speaker Gingrich’s leadership, Republicans articulated a bold, conservative agenda for our nation’s future. If America is to remain strong, we must once again pursue positive, proactive solutions that empower individuals, strengthen families, and hold government accountable to the people.”

Speaker Gingrich currently serves as a host of CNN’s Crossfire. He is a former presidential candidate, historian, and best-selling author. His most recent book is titled Breakout. Callista Gingrich is a New York Times best-selling author of children’s books focusing on American exceptionalism, including her latest book Yankee Doodle Dandy.

VIDEO – Sen. Johnny Isakson: Discusses the Need for Accountability, Oversight within Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Your Washington Desk:

Sen. Isakson Discusses the Need for Accountability, Oversight within Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Sen. Isakson, R-Ga., discussed the importance of ensuring accountability and oversight at the Department of Veterans’ Affairs’ care and treatment facilities across the country during his opening remarks at the joint Senate-House Veterans’ Affairs Committee hearing to receive a legislative presentation from several Veterans’ Service Organizations (PVA, IAVA, BVA, GSW, WWP, FRA, AFSA).

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