The Marietta Daily Journal – Sanders successfully walked tightrope on race as governor

Former Gov. Carl Sanders was no longer a household name in Georgia at the time of his death at age 89 on Sunday. Considering the turmoil of the 1960s Civil Rights era during which he served; and considering how the names of so many of his peers across the South are remembered with scorn, his seeming modern-day anonymity was a silent testimony to his ability to deftly lead the state through such troubled times.

The Augusta native and World War II veteran graduated from the University of Georgia School of Law, worked his way up in the state Legislature in the 1950s and first ran for governor in 1962.

Georgia and the rest of the South was in the midst of political and societal turmoil unmatched since Reconstruction. The Civil Rights Movement was gathering steam, but much of the white community was staunchly against dismantling segregation. Unfortunately, too many Southern governors, most notably Alabama’s George Wallace and Mississippi’s Ross Barnett, were eager to pander to the segregationists. Their states and others were wracked with race-related murders, lynchings, burnings, bombings and more.

Sanders ran in 1962 as a moderate in the all-important Democratic Primary against Marvin Griffin, a segregationist former governor. The general election was an after-thought in those days.

As governor from 1963-67, Sanders distanced himself from the segregationists and took what for the time, for a white Southern politician, were progressive stances on race. He was not one to stand in the schoolhouse door or make fiery “Hell No!” speeches. Rather, he took a “pox on both their houses” approach, criticizing both the Klan and “agitators” like the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr., took a similar approach, touting Atlanta as “The City Too Busy to Hate.” As a result, Georgia’s racial temperature rarely reached the boiling point, and the state dodged most of the self-inflicted black eyes suffered by its neighbors.

Sanders walked a tightrope as governor on civil rights: He opposed the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, but he also removed the “Whites Only” signs from the Capitol’s restrooms and drinking fountains; and later that year named two blacks as members of the state’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention.

via The Marietta Daily Journal – Sanders successfully walked tightrope on race as governor.

Council tables SPLOST agreement – The Daily Citizen: News

They are close, but the Dalton City Council and the Whitfield County Board of Commissioners haven’t quite reached agreement on how money from a 1 percent proposed Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) will be spent.

The City Council voted 4-0 Monday to table an intergovernmental agreement with the board that would spell out how that money would be spent. Mayor Dennis Mock usually only votes to break ties.

The move came after the city public works department received two studies from Dalton Utilities on the costs of repairing the dam at Threadmill Lake to reduce stormwater runoff downstream from the lake.

via Council tables SPLOST agreement – The Daily Citizen: News.

Smaller cities to approve SPLOST agreement – The Daily Citizen: News

Representatives from Whitfield County’s smaller cities say they support a proposed intergovernmental agreement to create a new Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST).

The Dalton City Council voted Monday to table the agreement while it reconsiders one of its key projects, a $2.2 million plan to repair the dam at Threadmill Lake and to link the lake with Lakeshore Park and Brookwood Park with trails.

Dalton Public Works Director Benny Dunn told the council that because the lake and the area around it are considered wetlands, just receiving the federal permits for the work would probably cost $2 million and take five to seven years. He said based on studies, the work would reduce runoff during a storm that would occur only every 50 years by 3 percent.

The agreement calls for a four-year SPLOST that is forecast to collect some $62 million.

Officials with the cities of Cohutta, Tunnel Hill and Varnell say they don’t plan any changes in their projects.

via Smaller cities to approve SPLOST agreement – The Daily Citizen: News.

Company announces plans for mill site – The Brunswick News: Local News

ST. MARYS — A New York-based company announced plans Thursday to acquire the former Durango-Georgia Paper Co. site from federal bankruptcy court and develop the site as a port.

Worldwide Group and Knights of the Green Shield, in a prepared statement, is calling the development the Port of St. Marys Industrial and Logistics Center.

James Coughlin, director of the Camden County Joint Development Authority, said the mill site’s trustee introduced him to an investment firm three weeks ago that was interested in seeing how the mill site, which is mostly demolished, could be developed.

The selling points for the 500-acre site are it has about 5,000 linear feet of mostly deep-water access along the North River and a railroad line that runs to the site and it is close to Interstate 95.

It also is near airports in Brunswick and Jacksonville and is less than 2 miles from the St. Marys Airport.

Plans include revitalizing rail access, building a modern barge berth and dock and securing a “clean-tech” manufacturing operation at the site.

Company officials said the project will open up St. Marys to world trade and the global marketplace.

via Company announces plans for mill site – The Brunswick News: Local News.

Forecast calls for 2.8 percent job growth in Savannah | savannahnow.com

Savannah’s job-growth rate next year will improve to 2.8 percent, according to the outlook released Wednesday by Georgia State University’s Economic Forecasting Center.

Savannah and Atlanta are expected to be the two most vibrant metro areas for the second year in a row. This year, both areas are slated to wind up with growth of 2.4 percent. Next year, Atlanta will register the same rate, but Savannah should enjoy the best rate in the state, according to the forecast.

Savannah gained 1,440 jobs in the July-September period, with the government sector adding 600, transportation/utilities 550 and construction/mining 320. Those compensated for losses elsewhere, including 210 in manufacturing and 110 in the professional/business-services sectors.

Statewide next year, tourism-related payrolls will swell faster than other sectors as will those in health care across Georgia, but manufacturing employment and exports will be slowed by weak global demand.

Rises in home values that boost property-tax digests are reviving local government budgets.

“Unsurprisingly, this has led to higher employment levels, where one in 10 people work for their local government in this modern era,” said Rajeev Dhawan, director of the Forecasting Center. “Furthermore, home prices are expected to continue to rise, which will result in more local spending and subsequent hiring.”

via Forecast calls for 2.8 percent job growth in Savannah | savannahnow.com.

Georgia Department of Labor: Unemployment down in October

ATLANTA — The Georgia Department of Labor announced today that Georgia’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for October was 7.7 percent, down two-tenths of a percentage point from 7.9 percent in September. The rate in October of last year was 7.8 percent.

“The rate fell as we had extremely strong job growth in October, which gave us the largest number of jobs in Georgia since May of 2008,” said State Labor Commissioner Mark Butler. “Our state’s private-sector employers get the credit because they created more than 91 percent of the new jobs in October and all of them since October of last year.”

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South Seeks Greater Sway in 2016 With Regional Primary – NationalJournal.com

Last week, [Georgia Secretary of State Brian] Kemp told the five other secretaries of state he’s working with in establishing a so-called “SEC” regional primary (named after the powerhouse college sports conference) that he intends to schedule Georgia’s presidential primary for March 1, 2016—an authority he was granted by the state Legislature in 2011. Tennessee has already set March 1 as its primary day, while the other four states still need to act through their respective legislatures to do the same. Primaries in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi are currently slated for later in March, while Arkansas’s is set for May.

Two other Southern states, Texas and Florida, are already planning to hold their primaries March 1. This is the earliest date anyone outside the usual four early-voting states can hold its presidential primary in 2016 without penalty under the new RNC rules. However, a state that sets its primary during the first two weeks of March must award its delegates to candidates proportionally, as opposed to a winner-take-all system, meaning there is still a benefit for states that choose to hold their primaries later on in the cycle.

“It definitely plays to the weaker candidates’ benefit for a bunch of states to go load up and go during the period of time that’s proportional,” one Southern GOP strategist says. “It seems like the South could make a much bigger statement if it went on March 15.”

But Kemp and his allies ultimately decided that bringing together a group of states that have been largely ignored in recent nomination battles and holding a primary as early as possible is the best way to get the attention of White House hopefuls.

via South Seeks Greater Sway in 2016 With Regional Primary – NationalJournal.com.

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for November 20, 2014

Three senior female Dachshund mixes in the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter with consecutive intake numbers seems like someone dropped off their pets. These girls, who may have lived together as sisters, will be available for adoption beginning tomorrow, November 21, 2014. What a blessing it would be to bring this sweet trio home together.

FemaleSrDoxie227

ID 42897 is a senior female Dachshund mix who is available for adoption from the Gwinnett County Animal Shelter. She is friendly and scared in the shelter.

Female Sr Doxie 222

ID 42898 is another friendly senior female Dachshund mix who is available for adoption from Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Female Doxie 223

ID 42899 is yet another friendly senior female Dachshund mix who is available for adoption from Gwinnett County Animal Shelter.

Senior Lab Gwinnett

ID 42827 is a sweet senior Retriever who has some skin issues. Frequently, these problems are the result of neglect and will be healed by moving them into a loving home that is less stressful than a noisy, scary shelter and giving them good food, love, and simple veterinary care. Senior dogs bring challenges, but they also bring a greater love and happiness into your family. Her skin issues means she is available to rescue groups only, but if you’re willing to foster or adopt her, let me know and I might know a rescue that can help.

This senior looks in her video like she’s probably a Golden Retriever, one of the finest breeds of dogs in history. She also loves to carry a tennis ball like a Retriever should.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 20, 2014

New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights on November 20, 1789.

Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Warm Springs, Georgia for the 22d time on November 20, 1931.

Duane Allman was born in Nashville, Tennessee on November 20, 1946.

President John F. Kennedy lifted the naval blockade of Cuba on November 20, 1962, ending the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Newt Gingrich was reelected Speaker of the House on November 20, 1996

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Mark your calendars: Brian Kemp will schedule Georgia’s 2016 Presidential Preference Election for March First.

Last week, Kemp told the five other secretaries of state he’s working with in establishing a so-called “SEC” regional primary (named after the powerhouse college sports conference) that he intends to schedule Georgia’s presidential primary for March 1, 2016—an authority he was granted by the state Legislature in 2011. Tennessee has already set March 1 as its primary day, while the other four states still need to act through their respective legislatures to do the same. Primaries in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi are currently slated for later in March, while Arkansas’s is set for May.

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Georgia House of Representatives » Rep. Amy Carter Appoints Members to DeKalb County Cityhood Subcommittee on Governmental Affairs

ATLANTA— Today House Governmental Affairs Committee Chairwoman Amy Carter (R-Valdosta) announced five appointees to the DeKalb County Cityhood Subcommittee of the House Governmental Affairs Committee. The following House members were appointed to serve on this subcommittee:

• Rep. Buzz Brockway (R-Lawrenceville), Chair

• Rep. Barry Fleming (R-Harlem)

• Rep. Mark Hamilton (R-Cumming)

• Rep. Howard Mosby (D-Atlanta)

• Rep. Mary Margaret Oliver (D-Decatur)

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