GaPundit http://gapundit.com Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections Fri, 29 Jul 2016 19:39:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.13 Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for July 29, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/29/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-29-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-29-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/29/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-29-2016/#comments Fri, 29 Jul 2016 10:03:40 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55722 GaPundit:

Pixie is a female, one of four little Terrier mix puppies who are available for adoption from the Humane Society of Harris County in Hamilton, GA. Jelly Belly is a friendly and playful adult male Pit Bull Terrier mix male who is available for adoption from Manchester Animal Control in Manchester, GA. Buster is a

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Pixie

Pixie is a female, one of four little Terrier mix puppies who are available for adoption from the Humane Society of Harris County in Hamilton, GA.

Jelly Belly

Jelly Belly is a friendly and playful adult male Pit Bull Terrier mix male who is available for adoption from Manchester Animal Control in Manchester, GA.

Buster

Buster is a 3.5-year old adult Retriever & Welsh Corgi Mix who is available for adoption from Humane Society of Harris County in Hamilton, GA.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 29, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/29/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-29-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-29-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/29/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-29-2016/#comments Fri, 29 Jul 2016 09:54:33 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55723 GaPundit:

July 30th could be celebrated as the birthday of democracy in America, as the Virginia House of Burgesses became the first legislative body in the New World on July 30, 1619.  Its first law, which, like all of its laws, would have to be approved by the London Company, required tobacco to be sold for at least

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GaPundit:

July 30th could be celebrated as the birthday of democracy in America, as the Virginia House of Burgesses became the first legislative body in the New World on July 30, 1619.

 Its first law, which, like all of its laws, would have to be approved by the London Company, required tobacco to be sold for at least three shillings per pound. Other laws passed during its first six-day session included prohibitions against gambling, drunkenness, and idleness, and a measure that made Sabbath observance mandatory.

On July 31, 1777, the Marquis de LaFayette was commissioned a Major General in the Continental Army, serving without pay.

The cornerstone for the first United States Mint was laid in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 31, 1792, becoming the first building constructed by the federal government under the Constitution.

Former President Andrew Johnson, who succeeded President Lincoln upon his assassination and oversaw much of the post-Civil War Reconstruction era, died of a stroke in Tennessee on July 31, 1875.

On July 31, 1906, a bill to create place a Constitutional Amendment on the November election for voters to decide whether to create an intermediate-level Georgia Court of Appeals was approved by the Georgia General Assembly.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt made his eighth visit to Warm Springs, Georgia on July 29, 1927.

On July 30, 1931, Georgia Governor Richard B. Russell, Jr. signed legislation merging Milton and Fulton Counties if voters in each county approved a referendum. Fulton had earlier merged with Campbell County, to the south.

Congress passed legislation establishing the National Aeronautic and Space Admininistration (NASA) on July 29, 1958.

Actor Laurence Fishburn was born in Augusta, Georgia on July 30, 1961.

President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed legislation creating Medicare, for seniors, and Medicaid for some low-income people on July 30, 1965.

The Doors’ “Light My Fire” became their first #1 hit on July 29, 1967.

Nolan Ryan, the greatest pitcher in major league baseball history, won his 300th career game on July 31, 1990. During eight innings, Ryan threw 146 pitches, while today, many pitchers are pulled at around the 100-pitch count.

“In the old days throwing that many pitches was a normal game,” said Nolan Ryan, who tossed a record seven no-hitters and is the all-time leader in strikeouts, fifth in innings pitched.

Ryan, currently the Rangers’ team president, is an outspoken detractor of the recent trend toward monitoring pitch counts. In a recent Sports Illustrated article, Ryan expressed his belief that today’s pitchers are “pampered” and that there is no reason why today’s pitchers cannot pitch as much as he and his colleagues did back in the day. As a result, Ryan is pushing his team’s pitchers to throw deeper into games and extend their arms further, emphasizing conditioning over what some would call coddling.

As Rangers pitching coach Mike Maddux told SI: “This generation of players has become a creature of the pitch count. Their ceiling has been lowered. It’s up to us to jack it back up.”

Carl Lewis won his fourth consecutive gold medal in the long jump at the Atlanta Olympics on July 29, 1996.

https://youtu.be/JuD1OdoXe9Q

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former Hall County Commission candidate Troy Phillips and his wife, Heather, were found dead from gunshot wounds in their yesterday. Our prayers are with their friends and family.

Georgia’s statewide sales tax holiday for back-to-school items begins at midnight tonight and runs through midnight Sunday night.

Click here for more information, including a list of items that are exempt from sales tax this weekend.

Governor Nathan Deal appointed Douglas R. Woodruff of Ringgold as Solicitor General for Catoosa County State Court.

The next session of the Georgia legislature may see the removal of nursing licenses from the Secretary of State’s Office, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

The Georgia Board of Nursing wants a divorce.

After years of poor communication, lingering resentments and suspicious maneuvering, the nurses want out of their long-term relationship with Secretary of State Brian Kemp. It’s been coming for a while, but Kemp’s sudden decision to remove the board’s executive director was the final straw.

When the board meet last week in Macon, the room was filled with nurses and nursing students from around the state. They were concerned about plans, revealed last month, to remove Executive Director Jim Cleghorn and replace him with the executive director of the board of cosmetology, which regulates nail salons among other things.

“We have outgrown the current organizational structure,” [board member Nancy] Barton, an administrator at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, said. “The type of communication — or lack thereof of communication and collaboration — with the board is negatively impacting the board’s ability to move the profession forward.”

State Rep. Calvin Smyre (D-Columbus) spoke to the Macon Telegraph about the Democratic National Convention.

Georgia state representative Calvin Smyre, D-Columbus, said he has been to 10 Democratic National Conventions, and he has never seen as many Georgians on the main stage as he has this year.

Smyre said the Democratic message should not be anti-Trump but rather pro-America, focusing specifically on economic development and empowering Georgians to help each other as opposed to tearing each other down.

“If we can get some help, if we can get some resources, if we can get our activists and our community leaders up and going, we can win Georgia,” he said.

Smyre reinforced one of themes of the week: turning Georgia blue.

“This is a winnable campaign,” he said. “I want us to leave here fired up and know that we can put Georgia back in play. We can help elect the next president of the United States.”

Voter turnout in this week’s runoff elections reached 12 percent of eligible voters.

The [Secretary of State's] office called it a “low” turnout for what was the last election in Georgia before November, although not everyone needed to turn out.

Ninety-six of Georgia’s 159 counties had races on the ballot, which was required for all candidates who did not win outright two months ago during the state’s general primary — when about 20 percent of registered voters turned out.

David Beauboin took a look at Georgia runoff elections, noting several points:

Historically, in Georgia, the odds are against state legislative incumbents in runoffs, winning in only 5 out of 13 instances (38%) from 2008-2014.  Since this includes one very good year in 2012 (when incumbents won 3 out of 4 races), that means that incumbents in runoffs have done very badly in 4 of the last 5 election cycles, dating back to 2008.

[W]hat was surely heart-breaking about the losses by State Reps. Dickson and Yates was how close each man came to winning his primary outright in May.  Rep. Dickson finished first with 49.7% in his three-way primary, and missed getting a majority by only 16 votes.  Rep. Yates received 49.0% in May, falling just 51 votes shy of avoiding a runoff.  The subsequent losses on Tuesday by both men was indeed unprecedented.  From 2008-2014, five candidates had been forced into a runoff after receiving 49% or more in their primary – all 5 went on to win their runoff election.

Former Paulding County Commissioner David Carmichael will take office in January as the next Paulding County Commission Chair after winning the runoff election on Tuesday over Roger Leggett, also a former County Commissioner.

Carmichael said it was “a great honor to have people push the button” to vote for him.

He said the unpredictable nature of runoff elections made him unsure exactly why he was victorious. Runoffs typically draw very low voter interest and the winner typically is able to convince more core supporters than an opponent to return to the polls for a second election.

“It’s one of those things that you can never know who’s going to turn out. I think that a characteristic of a runoff is what voting bloc is going to come back,” Carmichael said.

Leggett attributed the loss to an effort that merely “didn’t work out.”

“It’s just one of those things,” he said.

Leggett, who estimated he campaigned door to door at thousands of residences, said it was “sad” that only 8 percent of registered voters cast ballots in the runoff. Only 14 percent voted in the May 24 primary.

“Either they didn’t care or didn’t care enough about the issues to go out and vote,” Leggett said.

Carmichael said he campaigned door to door at more than 2,000 residences countywide and found many county residents are “waking up” to an issue he campaigned on — the need to recruit new jobs-producing industries to the county.

Debbie Whitlock won reelection as a Stephens County Commissioner.

According to the final unofficial results, Whitlock received 861 votes, or 65.48 percent, to Yearwood’s 454 votes, or 34.52 percent.

Whitlock said she is happy to have the opportunity to continue serving on the county commission.

“It has been a great four years and I am really excited and humbled and honored to be able to serve another four years,” said Whitlock. “I love this community. I love our county. I love the people in it. Stephens County is made up of a lot of different people with a lot of different views and different needs and different desires and a lot of times it is really hard to make decisions because you are serving so many different types of people. I just do the best I can for the good of the county as a whole.”

Whitlock went on to thank Yearwood for running a clean campaign.

“Kenny has been a friend of mine since school, a very good friend, and I just love him,” said Whitlock. “I appreciate him. I was really excited to know he was interested in what was going on in the community and we need more people like that who care and want to make a difference and I hope to see more of him in the future.”

From AccessWDUN.com, runoff results in several North Georgia counties:

BANKS COUNTY – 13/13 precincts reporting

CORONER:
Bobby Eubanks (incumbent) – 482 (42.17%)
Mark Savage - 661 (57.83%)

PROBATE COURT JUDGE:
Keith Gardiner – 594 (50.04%)
Helen Hewell – 593 (49.96%)

LUMPKIN COUNTY – 7/7 precincts reporting

BOARD OF EDUCATION, DISTRICT 1:
Catherine Ariemma – 614 (30.43%)
Mera Turner – 1,404 (69.57%)

CORONER:
Amanda Jones – 393 (20.84%)
Jim Sheppard – 1,493 (79.16%)

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 2:
Bobby Mayfield – 1,399 (75.01%)
Steve Shaw (incumbent) – 466 (24.99%)

MADISON COUNTY – 12/12 precincts reporting

SHERIFF:
Michael Moore – 2,281 (52.78%)
Kip Thomas (incumbent) – 2,041 (47.22%)

COUNTY COMMISSION CHAIR:
John D. Scarborough – 2,583 (61.03%)
Stanley Thomas – 1,649 (38.97%)

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 1:
Lee Allen – 492 (57.75%)
Wayne Douglas – 360 (42.25%)

In White County, November General Elections voters will choose a new District 2 Board of Education member in a Special Election.

The Bibb County Board of Education tentatively approved a higher property tax millage rate for 2017.

Columbus City Council voted to allow local brew pubs to sell beer to go in growlers.

Councilor Skip Henderson, who is bringing the ordinance to Council, said it is in response to new state Revenue Commissioner Lynne Riley’s interpretation of state law, which is that it allows brew pubs to sell their own wares in growler form.

“The ordinance is to bring it into alignment with the interpretation of the new state revenue commissioner,” Henderson said. “It just makes sense to me because it’s a growing cottage industry and a lot of millennials are interested in this. It allows them to do what a lot of craft beer stores do, fill up the growlers, seal them and let them take them home.”

Under the current local ordinance and the previous interpretation of state law, a brew pub would have to put its beer in kegs, have a licensed distributor pick it up, then bring it back to the pub (and charge for the transaction) before the pub could sell for off-premise consumption.

“The biggest difference will be the ability to sell all of our beers without first selling them to our wholesaler and then them selling them back to us,” said Melvin Baker, general manager of the Cannon. “In the end, it’s all about selling our product and making it as easy as possible for our customers.”

Power and Pokemon

Georgia Power will add significant amounts of solar energy to its portfolio over the next six years under a planning document approved by the Georgia Public Service Commission.

Georgia regulators on Thursday approved a revised Georgia Power plan that will increase the utility’s use of solar and wind but also allow it to charge customers $99 million to investigate the feasibility and then license a new nuclear plant.

The Georgia Public Service Commission passed both measures 4-1.

“Adding renewables and nuclear together makes sense,” said Commissioner Tim Echols in a prepared statement. “I am committed to keeping rates low and energy plentiful, diverse and clean.”

The approved plan includes an additional 1,600 megawatts of renewable energy by 2021. That’s nearly triple what the company initially proposed and is enough to power about 250,000 homes.

Georgia Power also asked Pokemon Go players to stay safe while wandering around looking at their screens.

The power company said it has three simple safety tips for players caught up in the chase for Pikachu and virtual monsters.

First, stay away from electric wires, power poles, electric substations and power plants.

Second, do not enter private property, especially those protected by fences and warning signs. The company adds that trespassing on Georgia Power property is not only illegal but also potentially dangerous.

Finally, watch where you’re walking, including roads, bridges and parking lots.

Newnan City Council passed an ordinance prohibiting internet or cell phone games in the city’s cemeteries.

“We’ve had complaints of damage to a fence that is owned by private property that separates the cemetery and Charles Place,” said Newnan City Manager Cleatus Phillips at Tuesday’s city council meeting. “We had some complaints of blocking roadways. We had some complaints of … actively running on and across the gravesites.”

Newnan Police Chief Douglas “Buster” Meadows said in the last two weeks there were 50 people in the cemetery at one time. They were cleared out, and then another large crowd came in.

“People who were trying to get into visit a grave, from the street, couldn’t get … to the grave,” he added.

Additionally, Newnan Council member Ray DuBose said he had received a complaint about the gaming in the cemetery.

“This is an attempt … to specifically exclude gaming and internet play on cellphones and that type of activity in our cemeteries,” said Newnan Mayor Keith Brady about the ordinance change. “I have no problem at all with the game of Pokémon, how they play it and where they play it … other than in our cemeteries.”

The Georgia Department of Transportation entered into a data sharing agreement with Waze.

According to the DOT, the partnership provides real-time, anonymous, Waze-generated incident and slow-down information to the department directly from the source: drivers themselves.

In exchange, the Georgia DOT said it will provide real-time construction, crash and road closure data to Waze.

Officials said this will result in a succinct, thorough overview of current road conditions.

Georgia DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry said this will give Georgia motorists real-time traffic information not only on our interstates and state routes, but also on arterial routes, information that is coming directly from the traveling public.

If you’re the owner of a Volkswagen diesel car that is covered by the recent court settlement, here’s how to start filing your claim.

Preacher Confesses to Faked Endorsement

Bishop Kenneth Adkins admitted to faking an endorsement in the Glynn County Commission District 2 election.

Bishop Kenneth Adkins said Thursday that he made up an endorsement he posted on Facebook at 7:15 a.m. Tuesday, 15 minutes after polls opened. The post said that state Rep. Jeff Jones, R-St. Simons Island, had endorsed retired surgeon J. Peter Murphy in the Republican runoff for the District 2 seat on the Glynn County Commission.

His motivation was the unfairness of Jones’ actual endorsement of Murphy’s opponent, incumbent Dale Provenzano, Adkins said.

Adkins said “cut and pasted” images from Jones’ public Facebook page and his legislative page to create the endorsement.

Adkins said he didn’t ask Murphy or Jones for permission to make up the endorsement and that he was taking full responsibility for it all.

“I told a lie,’’ he said, but added, “Politics is lying and stretching the truth.”

For his part, Jones called it, “Dirty politics, shameful politics. I think Peter Murphy needs to be careful who he associates with.”

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Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for July 28, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/28/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-28-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-28-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/28/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-28-2016/#comments Thu, 28 Jul 2016 11:29:04 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55705 GaPundit:

Sydney is a 2-year old, 50 pound female Labrador Retriever & Shepherd Mix who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA. Sydney was rescued along with her seven puppies, some of whom are seen below. She’s a beautiful and loving dog and a great mom to her babies. Rocky Bruce is

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GaPundit:

Sydney

Sydney is a 2-year old, 50 pound female Labrador Retriever & Shepherd Mix who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA. Sydney was rescued along with her seven puppies, some of whom are seen below. She’s a beautiful and loving dog and a great mom to her babies.

Rocky Bruce

Rocky Bruce is an 8-week old Labrador Retriever & Shepherd Mix male puppy who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA.

Charles Edward

Charles Edward is an 8-week old Labrador Retriever & Shepherd Mix male puppy who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA.

Billie Joe

Billie Joe is an 8-week old Labrador Retriever and Shepherd mix male puppy who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA.

Axel

Axel is a young male Coonhound puppy who is available for adoption from The Pixel Fund in Macon, GA.

Axel is smart and quickly learning the business of doing his business outside. Playful, snuggly, and happily alive, he is ready to be adopted! Axel is truly a baby, just 8 weeks old.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 28, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/28/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-28-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-28-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/28/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-28-2016/#comments Thu, 28 Jul 2016 11:16:16 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55706 GaPundit:

On July 28, 1868, United States Secretary of State William Seward proclaimed that the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution had been ratified and was now part of the Constitution. The first section of the 14th Amendment often forms the basis for litigation and reads: All persons born or naturalized in the United States,

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GaPundit:

On July 28, 1868, United States Secretary of State William Seward proclaimed that the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution had been ratified and was now part of the Constitution. The first section of the 14th Amendment often forms the basis for litigation and reads:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Georgia initially rejected the 14th Amendment in 1866, later ratifying it on July 21, 1868 as a condition for readmission.

On July 28, 1978, Animal House was released, instantly becoming one of the greatest films of all time. In case you’ve never seen the film, there is a tiny little bit of adult language in the following clip.

On July 28, 1994, the United States Postal Service issued a stamp commemorating “The General” locomotive, which was stolen in 1862 during the Great Locomotive Chase. Today, The General may be viewed at The Southern Museum in Kennesaw.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Last week, Governor Deal appointed Ray C. Smith to a judgeship in Bryan County State Court and Ronald C. Goulart as to Catoosa County State Court.

Deal spoke to new employees of the Hall County Public Schools, according to the Gainesville Times.

The “opportunity school district” would allow the state to take over “chronically failing districts,” which Deal said are districts that fail to “score above an F” for three or more consecutive years.

The governor portrayed the proposal as a way to break the links between inmates in state prisons and school dropouts. He said a study from when he first took office in 2011 showed that 70 percent of state inmates are dropouts.

Deal presented the constitutional amendment as a choice between the status quo in education and prisons or breaking the pattern — reducing the number of prisoners and the number of dropouts.

“I take offense at some with the educational system who are so opposed to doing something about this blight on education that they will be satisfied with the status quo,” Deal said.

The Professional Association of Georgia Educators and Georgia Association of Educators both oppose the constitutional amendment.

Peter Murphy won the Republican Primary Runoff for Glynn County Commission District 2 over incumbent Dale Provenzano.

“I am honored, and I am humbled, and I appreciate that all the people that believed in me came out and voted for me, and I can promise them that I will work as hard and as honestly as I can, not only for the island for but for Glynn County,” Murphy said.

Murphy took a healthy lead with 58.71 percent to Provenzano’s 41.29 percent, overcoming Provenzano by 17.42 percent. It constituted the largest gap of the three runoff races which also included Clerk of Superior Court and Glynn County Coroner.

That shakes out to 2,257 votes for Murphy and 1,587 votes for Provenzano.

“That is a significant victory, and I’d like to build on that momentum and convince the commissioners that I am here to cooperate with them and do right by the island,” Murphy said.

“The biggest point is, here I am a heart surgeon whose come down here for over 40 years, who has never been involved in politics with virtually no name recognition and I won 60-40. That’s very humbling,” Murphy said.

Here’s where it gets weird. After Murphy’s election, State Rep. Jeff Jones issued a statement that he never endorsed Murphy in the election.

Today we learned, that paid-staff working on behalf of now Commissioner-Elect Dr. Peter Murphy, created, distributed, and promoted fraudulent posts on Facebook, and may have sent other dishonest electronic communications designed to falsify an endorsement by Representative Jeff Jones of Dr. Peter Murphy.

To be very clear, Representative Jeff Jones never endorsed Dr. Peter Murphy period.

More from the Brunswick Business Journal,

Republican State Rep. Jeff Jones had endorsed Provenzano, a long-time political ally in the race who was seeking a second term.

But, through his representative, Jones is now concerned that there were ‘dirty tricks’ used to influence the election Tuesday.

On Monday, Rep. Jones sent out an email in clear support of Provenzano, with no mention of Murphy; it was also distributed to all of the local media in the region.  The Brunswick Business Journal received Rep. Jones’ first email on Monday evening, and then a second email at 4:00 p.m. on election day, reminding voters that the polls would close at 7:00 p.m.

According to Jones’ representative Jeffrey Sewell, owner of Sewell Consultancy who also serves as Jones’ Communications Director, the Rev. Kenneth Adkins, a local black pastor, posted the following message on his Facebook page at 7:15 a.m. election day.  It reads: “Wow. Just got a letter from Georgia State Representative Jeff Jones endorsing Dr Peter Murphy for Glynn County Commission, District 2, encompassing St. Simons Island. Thank You Sir. Everybody Please Go For Vote Dr. Peter Murphy Today!”

The post still appears on Adkins’s Facebook page (see Photo), and gives the clear impression that Rep. Jones was now endorsing Murphy over Provenzano.  Adkins also took the image of Jeff Jones’s campaign posters from the State Rep’s website and a picture of Jones’ family to add to the post to give the impression of its authenticity.

Sewell states that they are investigating the incident.  “I’m concerned that the election could have been affected to that degree.  Dale was working very hard, going door-to-door, doing everything you should do,” he said, in an interview today.

Matt Gurtler will take the State House seat formerly occupied by State Rep Stephen Allison after winning the runoff election in HD 8.

Gurtler took 49 percent of the vote in Rabun, but captured 62 percent of the vote in Towns, 75 percent in Union and 59 percent in White. In all, Gurtler won with 61 percent of the total vote.

Incumbent Madison County Sheriff Kip Thomas was ousted in the Republican Primary by Michael Moore, who will take office in January.

In Henry County, Johnny Wilson beat incumbent District 1 County Commissioner Bo Moss in the Republican Primary Runoff and faces no opposition in November.

In Newton County, Democrat Marcello Banes won the Primary Runoff to advance to the November General Election against Republican Aaron Varner. For District 5 on the County Commission, Ronnie Cowan won the GOP Runoff and faces no opposition in November.

In Savannah’s Democratic Primary Runoff, Tabitha Odell beat incumbent District 5 County Commissioner Yusuf Shabazz to take office in January.

“I think the main focus with everything going on in the world, everything going on in the city, I want to work on team-playing, unity, a city of Savannahians and not individual pockets of people,” she said. “I think that’s very important.”

Speaking by phone as the final votes were tallied Tuesday, the commissioner-elect said she was excited with the outcome and ready to get started representing the district when the next term begins.

“I am thankful that we ran a cordial race, and I appreciate everyone that came out to vote for me,” Odell said. “And for those who did not vote, I appreciate the opportunity to show them … I will do my best for the entire district. Whether you supported me this time or not, I hope to earn your support over the next four years.”

In Bryan County, Don Montgomery won the runoff for Solicitor General and Karen Krupp won the election as vice chair of the Board of Education.

Montgomery topped Andrew Johnson with 54 percent of the vote (996 – 850); while Krupp came out on ahead garnering 56 percent (1,045-819).

Chuck Thaxton claimed a seat on the Polk County Commission representing District 2 after winning the Republican nomination with no Democrat on the November ballot.

Cathy Williams won the runoff for Muscogee County Board of Education District 7, while incumbent District 1 BOE member Pat Hugley Green retained her seat.

Ron Adams won the GOP runoff election for Glynn County Clerk of Courts, while Marc Neu takes the GOP nod to advance to the General Election for Coroner.

 

Three candidates will be on the November ballot for Mayor of Villa Rica – Jeff Reese, Sheikh Tijan Drammeh, and Issac J. Robinson – as will a quartet of candidates for an open Ward 4 City Council seat, Michael Nicholas Day, Michael Young, Gil McDougal, and Joey Kelley.

In Lula, Georgia, voters will decide whether to approve sale of liquor in restraurants.

The City Council voted Wednesday morning to place a referendum on the Nov. 8 ballot asking voters of the Northeast Hall city if they favor being allowed to buy liquor at restaurants and other establishments.

The council also voted to not put on the ballot a separate referendum asking voters if they want liquor sales on Sunday.

“We don’t want Sunday sales,” Smith and Councilman Mordecai Wilson both said, almost at the same time.

Buying beer and wine at a restaurant or bar might be decided later by the council, City Manager Dennis Bergin said.

Currently, only beer and wine package sales are allowed in Lula Monday through Saturday.

While the state requires cities to get voter approval before allowing liquor sales, cities don’t need a referendum to allow on-premises beer and wine sales.

Council members have indicated they are awaiting the outcome of the Nov. 8 vote “before they take that issue up,” Bergin said.

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Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for July 27, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/27/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-27-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-27-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/27/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-27-2016/#comments Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:27:16 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55702 GaPundit:

Aries is a 3-year old, 30-pound, female Plott Hound mix who is available for adoption from the Dawson County Humane Society in Dawsonville, GA. Aries is a fun little girl. She like to run and play and then army crawl up to what she wants to smell. She enjoys belly rubs and her ears scratched.

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GaPundit:

Aries

Aries is a 3-year old, 30-pound, female Plott Hound mix who is available for adoption from the Dawson County Humane Society in Dawsonville, GA.

Aries is a fun little girl. She like to run and play and then army crawl up to what she wants to smell. She enjoys belly rubs and her ears scratched. She has plenty of energy for hiking and jogging or just playing with the kids in the back yard.

Blue

Blue is an adult male Australian Shepherd (Blue Heeler) mix who is available for adoption from the Dawson County Humane Society in Dawsonville, GA.

Blue is a perky Heeler mix who is looking for an energetic and outgoing family. He would be great to take hiking or early morning jogs. Give him a scratch behind his ears and you will be his best friend forever. He has only been with his brother (Buster) but seems to do a little better around other dogs then his brother. He can still be choosy with his friends so you would have to do a meet and greet.

Logan

Logan is a senior male Hound mix who is available for adoption from the Dawson County Humane Society in Dawsonville, GA.

Logan gets along good with other dogs so a furbrother or sister would probably be great for him. He would rather be around his humans rather than being outside. He loves to be loved.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 27, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/27/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-27-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-27-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/27/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-27-2016/#comments Wed, 27 Jul 2016 13:36:12 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55686 GaPundit:

On July 27, 1974, the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Committee approved the first impeachment article against President Richard M. Nixon. The first such impeachment recommendation in more than a century, it charge[d] President Nixon with unlawful activities that formed a “course of conduct or plan” to obstruct the investigation of the Watergate break-in

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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GaPundit:

On July 27, 1974, the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Committee approved the first impeachment article against President Richard M. Nixon.

The first such impeachment recommendation in more than a century, it charge[d] President Nixon with unlawful activities that formed a “course of conduct or plan” to obstruct the investigation of the Watergate break-in and to cover up other unlawful activities.

The vote was 27 to 11, with 6 of the committee’s 17 Republicans joining all 21 Democrats in voting to send the article to the House.

The majority included three conservative Southern Democrats and three conservative Republicans.

A bomb exploded at a free concert in Centennial Park in Atlanta on July 27, 1996.

Police were warned of the bombing in advance, but the bomb exploded before the anonymous caller said it would, leading authorities to suspect that the law enforcement officers who descended on the park were indirectly targeted.

Within a few days, Richard Jewell, a security guard at the concert, was charged with the crime. However, evidence against him was dubious at best, and in October he was fully cleared of all responsibility in the bombing.

Former Georgia Governor Zell Miller took the oath of office as United States Senator on July 27, 2000. Miller would go on to win a special election for the remainder of the term in November 2000.

On July 27, 2014, former Braves manager Bobby Cox and pitchers Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine were inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, along with former White Sox player Frank Thomas, who was born in Columbus, Georgia.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Our prayers go out to Walton County Sheriff Joe Chapman, who was in an auto accident yesterday, and to the unnamed driver in the other car who was flown to Grady.

I’m going to start this morning with the two biggest races on the ballot – Cobb County, where Chairman Tim Lee was sent packing, and the Third Congressional District, where former West Point Mayor Drew Ferguson beat State Senator Mike Crane.

In Cobb, two-time challenger Mike Boyce beat incumbent Tim Lee by a roughly 2:1 margin in the Republican Primary Runoff.

[R]etired Marine Col. Mike Boyce overwhelmed the incumbent by garnering 25,264 votes, good for 64 percent of the 39,510 votes cast, while opponent Tim Lee received 14,246 votes, or 36 percent, according to unofficial results from the Cobb Board of Elections.

Boyce said the election results show that people want “to make sure that their government is open and transparent, and if you’re going to use our money, you should ask us first.”

“I’m happy for the trust that the people of Cobb County has put in me by electing me as the new chairman,” Boyce said. “But I’m not sure if I’m happier for my volunteers, who put in so much work during this campaign.”

Lee continued to support his involvement with the Atlanta Braves’ move to Cobb — a pivotal factor in the race — saying he was looking forward to the Atlanta Braves’ first pitch in its new stadium.

“I’ve been asked many times tonight if I would have done anything differently and the answer is no,” Lee said.

In the Third Congressional District, it appears that Drew Ferguson won by a 54:46 margin over Mike Crane. From the Newnan Times-Herald:

Ferguson gathered with friends, family and fans at the West Point Depot on Tuesday night. Drew Ferguson thanked the audience for their support, but noted hard work was still on the horizon.

“We have a lot to do between now and November,” he said. “I’m very excited about the chance to be part of the process that gets this nation back on the right track.”

Speaking to the general election, Ferguson urged his supporters to get behind Donald Trump. Regardless of their opinions of the Republican candidate, he cautioned against sitting on the sidelines.

“I want everyone to remember, we have the opportunity to appoint conservative Supreme Court justices,” Ferguson said. “We have to do this for the nation. You may not like Trump, but I tell you this, you cannot allow Hillary to get into the White House.”

Once results were in and it was clear the Crane campaign was not victorious, a video of clips from the campaign was played, while Crane sat with his arm around his wife, Tracey, with family members at his side.

“Glory to God. Glory to God. That was your movie, friend,” Crane said as it concluded. Though the numbers indicate that he didn’t win, “I would look at that and ask you – what have we lost?” Crane said. “I would not trade any single one of those smiles, one of those efforts, one of those calls for anything in the world.”

Crane said the goal of his campaign was to “honor God in all that we do. And I can say without any shadow of a doubt that each and every one of you were image bearers of the King. And I thank you for that.”

He hinted at a future run for office. “God’s got bigger things for us. The next race won’t be in November. We just don’t know when it will be, do we?” Crane said.

I was talking on the phone this morning with a friend who is also a politician, trying to figure out what the two campaigns had in common. If you’re looking at it in terms of an establishment v. grassroots race, the results were mixed. The Chambers of Commerce lined up behind Ferguson and helped him across the finish line, while in Cobb County, the local Chamber fell short with Tim Lee. Perhaps it’s more about personal style. Both Tim Lee and Mike Crane were the more aggressive candidates in their races, but in a year in which Donald Trump is the GOP nominee for President, how likely is it that a confrontational personality turns off Republican Primary voters?

In DeKalb County, Steve Bradshaw put an end to the political career of incumbent County Commissioner Sharon Barnes-Sutton, winning by a 3:1 margin. From Decaturish,

Bradshaw received 75 percent of the votes cast in the runoff for the Democratic primary, getting 5,853 votes compared to Sutton’s 1,907 votes.

He will face Republican Willie J. Willis in the November general election.

“I am proud of the people of DeKalb County,” Bradshaw told Decaturish. “They are tired of the trash. They want something better, so hopefully I can deliver that. I feel good. I am excited to get to work for the people of District 4.”

DeKalb County Commissioner Nancy Jester sent out a press release congratulating Bradshaw,

I welcome my good friend Commissioner-elect Steve Bradshaw to the DeKalb County Boards of Commissioners.  It is a new day in DeKalb County. I look forward to working with Steve on a Budget and policies which make us all a stronger “One DeKalb.” It is time for a Board of Commissioners who work together to make DeKalb strong – with Steve Bradshaw on the DeKalb County Board of Commissioners this work will start in January.

In Augusta, former State Rep. Lee Anderson cruised to victory in Senate District 24.

According to unofficial election results on the Georgia Secretary of State’s website, Anderson received 5,880 votes compared to 4,627 for Grzybowski. Anderson won every county except Richmond, which had a small precinct where Grzybowski beat him 10 votes to 8.

“I am just humbled and honored that the people have faith and trust in me and I’m excited to be able to move forward in the campaign because it’s not over,” Anderson said. “In November we have a Democratic opponent so we are still campaigning. We will get up in the morning and still fight for State Senate District 24.”

Senate District 43 produced a nail-biter, with former State Rep. Tonya Anderson appearing to edge State Rep. Dee Dawkins-Haigler by 8 votes to take on Republican JaNice VanNess in November.

DeWayne Hill won the GOP Primary Runoff for State House District 3 in the upper left-hand corner of Georgia.

Hill defeated Jeff Holcomb in a run-off election tonight, 1,822 votes to 1,324. He will replace Tom Weldon, who decided not to run for re-election in March.

Primary Runoff elections were not kind to Republican incumbents. Karen Mathiak beat Republican incumbent John Yates, the last WWII veteran in the Georgia legislature.

Karen Mathiak defeated incumbent 73rd District State Representative John Yates with 56 percent of the vote. That district includes precincts in Fayette, Spalding and Henry counties. There is no Democratic challenger on the November ballot.

GOP incumbent Tom Dickson also lost his reelection bid.

Murray County banker-turned-farmer Jason Ridley defeated longtime incumbent Tom Dickson in a runoff on Tuesday and is expected to represent state House of Representatives District 6 in the Legislature next year.

“I’m tickled to death,” Ridley said Tuesday night. “I’m just so grateful to the people for believing in me and trusting me. My word is as good as I said it is, and I will do what I said I would do, which is listen to the people.”

Ridley defeated Dickson by 1,839 votes (54.04 percent) to 1,564 votes (45.96 percent) in the runoff for the Republican nomination for District 6. No Democrat qualified, and the deadline for independent candidates has passed. The district includes parts of Whitfield and Murray counties.

Ridley said he got into the race because he doesn’t think politicians listen to the common man, and he said that during the next five months before he is sworn in he plans to get started doing exactly that.

“I want to find out what the people want and what they think has been neglected,” he said. “I’m going to be putting together some town hall meetings in Whitfield County and Murray County, find out what their concerns are and go from there.”

Likely the two most highly-contested State House districts in November will be House District 80 and 81, neighboring districts in DeKalb County.

Attorney Meagan Hanson won a narrow victory over Alan Cole in House District 80.

Hanson pulled in 777 votes or 50.95 %, while Cole received 748 votes or 49.05 %.

Voter turnout was low, with just over 1,500 total votes cast. Hanson took top billing in Fulton County, while Cole was the top pick in DeKalb.

Hanson will now face Democrat Incumbent Taylor Bennett for the House District 80 seat in the November 8th General Election.

In House District 81, Republican Lane Flynn won the runoff handily over Jim Duffie.

Lane Flynn has defeated Jim Duffie in the House District 81 Republican Primary Runoff. Flynn pulled in 504 votes or 71.09%, while Duffie received 205 votes or 28.91 %.

“I’m honored and deeply humbled to have been chosen by the voters to represent the Republican Party in the general election,” Flynn told The [Brookhaven] Post. “I look forward to bringing our positive message of reform and growth to the people of District 81.”

Flynn will now face Incumbent Democrat Scott Holcomb for the House District 81 seat in the November 8th General Election.

Dawson County Sheriff”s Office Major Jeff Johnson will take office in January 2017 after winning the Primary Runoff election for Sheriff.

Jeff Johnson edged past Tony Wooten to claim victory in the sheriff’s race, while Nicole Stewart is celebrating a successful campaign against Andi Henson Juliette to be the county’s next tax commissioner.

It’s been more than 20 years since Dawson County had a new sheriff. Billy Carlisle, who is currently serving his fifth term, did not seek re-election.

Current Tax Commissioner Linda Townley also did not seek a fourth term.

Johnson, commander of the Dawson County Jail, received 1,890 votes (52.07 percent), to Wooten’s 1,740 votes (47.93 percent).

Scott Minter claimed a seat on the Conasauga Circuit Superior Court in yesterday’s runoff election.

With overwhelming support in Murray County, Chief Assistant District Attorney Scott Minter captured a seat on the Superior Court bench on Tuesday, defeating Steve Farrow in a nonpartisan runoff.

Farrow took Whitfield County by 86 votes, but Minter won Murray County with a more than 1,000-vote advantage. The Conasauga Judicial Circuit includes both counties.

“I want to thank the citizens of Murray and Whitfield County for their support,” Minter said. “We ran so strong in Murray County, but we were also very strong in Whitfield County. I just thank the citizens of both counties so much.”

Minter finished with 4,608 votes (56.25 percent) to Farrow’s 3,583 votes (43.75 percent). In Whitfield County, Farrow led by 2,946 to 2,860, but Minter received 1,748 votes in Murray County, while Farrow pulled 637 votes.

In Clayton County, Shana Rooks traded her District 3 Commission seat for a win in Clayton County Superior Court, and will be joined on the bench by Robert Mack, who won his runoff. Felicia Franklin-Warner appears on-track to succeed Rooks in the District 3 seat.

John Morgan was elected as a Judge in Cobb County State Court, defeating Kellie Hill in the runoff. Kellie Kenner McIntyre won the Richmond County State Court runoff against Robert “Bo” Hunter.

With 70 of 70 precincts reporting, the current Richmond County State Court solicitor received 8,596 votes compared to 6,554 for Hunter, an attorney and former solicitor.

McIntyre attributed her success to faith in God when commenting about the election result. Hunter could not be reached for comment.

In the Griffin Judicial Circuit, Ben Coker won the Primary Runoff for District Attorney.

Assistant District Attorney Ben Coker with 57 percent of the vote has been elected district attorney for the Griffin Judicial Circuit after defeating Fayette County lawyer and former assistant district attorney Rudjard Hayes in Tuesday’s Republican Primary Election runoff.

There is no Democratic district attorney challenger on the November ballot.

Hayes won 5,524, or about 67 percent, of the 8,284 votes cast in Fayette, but Coker carried Spalding 3,368 to 1,761 (66 percent), Pike 1,277 to 234 (85 percent), and his home county Upson 2,752 to 133 (95 percent). In total, Coker garnered 10,157 votes to Hayes’ 7,652.

Fulton County Sheriff Ted Jackson appears to have beaten back an intra-party challenge and advances to the November General Election. In runoff elections for two seats on the Fulton County Superior Court bench, Belinda Edwards beat Sterling Eaves by 58-to-42, and Eric Dunaway won over Gary Alembik by 56-to-44.

Heather Lanier bested Ryan Cleveland for Superior Court in the South Georgia Circuit.

Heather Lanier won the runoff election for Superior Court Judge of the South Georgia Judicial Circuit Tuesday night, winning against opponent Ryan Cleveland with 60 percent of the votes.

“I had a lot of outstanding supporters who worked so hard for me and believed in me, and it showed in the results,” Lanier said. “I would not be where I’m at tonight if it were not for all those people who put in tireless hours, all having faith in my ability to do the job. To me that’s what the results show.”

Lanier won the runoff election by a final tally of 3894 votes to Cleveland’s 2333.

Overall she won four of the five counties in the circuit. In her Baker County, where she is from, she won 568 to 139. The Calhoun County results were 342-135 in favor of Lanier. Grady County voters chose Lanier 663-536, and in Mitchell County she won 1491 to 303. Cleveland’s lone victory came in his home county of Decatur, which he won 1220 to 830.

Bob Kovacs claimed victory in Cherokee County Commission District 3 over fellow Republican Jack Staver.

Terrell County Sheriff John Bowens won reelection with nearly 60 percent on turnout higher than the May 24 Primary, while Ellen Harnage won the runoff for Tax Commissioner. Melanie Gahring was elected Probate Judge for Lee County while Amber Holloway won the Probate Judge seat in Crisp County and Michael Rogerson was elected Probate Judge for Seminole County.

Gary Autry won the runoff election for Tax Commissioner in Catoosa County.

June Wood won the Republican nomination for Henry County Commission Chair and will meet Democrat Carlotta Harrell in November.

Wood defeated opponent, Lisa McGarity, by just over 500 votes in Tuesday’s runoff election. As of 10:15 p.m. Tuesday, Wood received 54.87 percent, with McGarity receiving 45.13 percent. According to the Henry County elections website, 5,628 ballots were cast in the race

“We are celebrating,” said Wood, as she awaited final numbers at Kirby G’s in McDonough. “We’ve got a lot of work to do. I’m going to continue to introduce myself to others and ask for their vote.”

Wood said during the coming months she plans to continue to discuss her plans keep Henry County safe, enhance traffic congestion, and bring jobs to make Henry County a “great place to work, live, play and pray.”

Henry County Elections Director Tina Lunsford had expected a 10 percent turnout, which has been the average for local runoff elections in previous years. Tuesday’s unofficial numbers showed that only 5 percent of Henry County’s registered voters cast a ballot in the chair race.

In Macon-Bibb County, Joe Allen won the runoff election for Commission District 6, while Bo Adams handily claimed a seat on the Bibb County Superior Court with more than 71% of the vote.

Laura Semanson was elected to the Forsyth County Commission for District 5, facing. no opposition in November.

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Adoptable (Official) Georgia Dogs for July 26, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/26/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-26-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-26-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/26/adoptable-official-georgia-dogs-for-july-26-2016/#comments Tue, 26 Jul 2016 12:01:32 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55673 GaPundit:

Cassie is a 3-4 year old female Beagle and Hound mix who is available for adoption from Animal Refuge Foundation of Wayne Co., Inc. in Jesup, GA. Cassie’s family moved away without her and she waited a week for their return before being brought into the pound. Henry is a 2.5 year old, 45-pound male

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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GaPundit:

Cassie

Cassie is a 3-4 year old female Beagle and Hound mix who is available for adoption from Animal Refuge Foundation of Wayne Co., Inc. in Jesup, GA. Cassie’s family moved away without her and she waited a week for their return before being brought into the pound.

HenryBassador

Henry is a 2.5 year old, 45-pound male Labrador Retriever and Basset Hound mix who is available for adoption from Animal Refuge Foundation of Wayne Co., Inc. in Jesup, GA.

He is very sweet and friendly.

Pickles

Pickles is a 1.5 year old female Dachshund who is available for adoption from Animal Refuge Foundation of Wayne Co., Inc. in Jesup, GA.

Pearl

Pearl is a 3-5 year old female Hound mix who weighs 42 pounds and is available for adoption from Animal Refuge Foundation of Wayne Co., Inc. in Jesup, GA.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 26, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/26/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-26-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-26-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/26/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-26-2016/#comments Tue, 26 Jul 2016 11:29:10 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55674 GaPundit:

On July 26, 1775, the United States Postal Service was created by the Second Continental Congress, may God have mercy on their souls. Benjamin Franklin served as the first Postmaster. On July 26, 2015, former Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, the first pitcher inducted who had undergone

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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GaPundit:

On July 26, 1775, the United States Postal Service was created by the Second Continental Congress, may God have mercy on their souls. Benjamin Franklin served as the first Postmaster.

On July 26, 2015, former Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, the first pitcher inducted who had undergone Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow.

Smoltz won the 1996 Cy Young award and reached the playoffs 14 times with Atlanta. The Braves won five pennants and the 1995 World Series with Smoltz on the roster. He’s the first pitcher to win more than 200 games and save at least 150 games. He’s also the first player inducted with Tommy John surgery on his resume.

Smoltz understood his debt to John.

“I’m a miracle. I’m a medical miracle,” Smoltz said. “I never took one day for granted.”

Smoltz also heaped praise on former manager Bobby Cox and teammates Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux, who were inducted a year ago, and delivered a message to parents of the players of tomorrow as the number of Tommy John surgeries continues to escalate.

“Understand that this is not normal to have a surgery at 14 or 15 years old,” Smoltz said to warm applause. “Baseball is not a year-round sport. They’re competing too hard, too early. That’s why we’re having these problems.”

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Today is election day, and per my tradition, I’ll be walking over to cast my ballot today. Among the races on my ballot will be House District 80, where I’ll vote for Meagan Hanson.

Paulding County voters will choose between two former County Commissioners — David Carmichael and Roger Leggett — in the Republican runoff election for County Commission Chair, with no Democratic opposition in November.

Lee County hosts a runoff for Probate Judge between Miles O’Quinn and Melanie Gahring. In Terrell County, Democrats will choose between Darlene Paul and Mary Ellen Harnage for Tax Commissioner; also on the Terrell County Democratic ballot is a runoff between incumbnt Sheriff John Bowens against James Driver Jr.

Southeast Georgia will see several Primary Election Runoffs today:

[I]n Brantley County [] former sheriff Robert C. Thomas is facing deputy sheriff Len Davis in the Republic primary. Thomas lost his 2012 re-election bid to the current sheriff, Jack Whisenant, who did not make the runoff in what had been a five man race in May.

The winner will take on Democrat Chris Allen, who had no opposition in the primary.

Glynn County has three races on the Republican primary ballot.

St. Simons Island voters will decide between County Commissioner Dale Provenzano and challenger Peter Murphy. In countywide voting, retired banker Ron Adams and process server and bartender Sam Tostensen are running for county clerk of court and Deputy Coroner Jo Chapman and former Glynn County police detective Marc Neu are running for coroner.

In McIntosh County, longtime Chief Magistrate Teresa Jennings is facing Harold A. Webster III in her re-election bid.

In Camden County, the only race on the ballot is a nonpartisan runoff for the District 5 school board seat between Ronnie Wise and Mark Giddens.

Fulton County Democrats will choose today between incumbent Sheriff Ted Jackson and former Sheriff Richard Lankford for the right to face Republican Ben Cowart in November.

If you live in Fulton County and voted in the Republican Primary on May 24th, there are no GOP runoffs unless you live in Sandy Springs House District 80. Outside of HD 80, you will be voting in the Nonpartisan Primary Runoff for two judicial seats.

“Our biggest concern is turnout,” said Fulton County Magistrate Judge Gary Alembik, who is running against Eric Dunaway for the [Superior Court] seat currently held by Judge Wendy Shoob. “Fulton County has more than 500,000 voters, and they only expect 3 percent to show up for the runoff.”

Dunaway, a DeKalb County prosecutor, said his strategy is to campaign as widely as possible.

“We’ve been very strong in south Fulton, East Point and Fairburn; now we’re going up into Roswell, talking to voters all over the county,” he said. “Too many folks think the election’s in November.”

Getting people to vote is also top of mind for former Fulton Magistrate Sterling Eaves, who is running against Belinda Edwards for the seat of departing Judge Bensonetta Lane. Eaves started campaigning in August, ahead of the other candidates, and said she’s “spent the last year doing everything I know how to get my name out there.”

She said the fact that the runoff is for several races—the county solicitor, sheriff and four Georgia House districts—could prompt more voters to participate. But, she said, “Most people aren’t as aware there’s a runoff as you’d like them to be.”

As she campaigns, Edwards, the former chief judge of the Fulton County Juvenile Court, said she frequently hears comments like “There are too many elections in Fulton County” and “Why is there a runoff?”

The Fulton County Democratic Primary Runoff for House District 59 has already run to more than $400,000 in combined spending.

Both Janine Brown and David Dreyer have said they want to see more school funding, better transit and more jobs in their district, though they rank the issues a little differently. Voters ranked the two pretty close together in the first round of voting: Brown took 1,650 votes to Dreyer’s 1,610. Third-place finisher Josh Noblitt was knocked out of the race with 896 votes.

Brown’s professional history — she spent years as a union rep — is reflected in her labor-heavy list of top donors, as added up by Atlanta Unfiltered. She had raised about $140,000 through June 30. Dreyer, an attorney, has also attracted cash from fellow legal eagles. His donations totaled up to around $200,000 through June 30.

The three campaigns — Brown, Dreyer, and Noblitt — raised in total more than $419,000 through the first half of this year.

In Senate District 43, Democrats Tonya Anderson and Dee Dawkins-Haigler, both current or former State Reps., are on the runoff ballot for the November election against Republican State Senator JaNice VanNess.

State Senate District 24 in the Augusta area has a Republican Primary Runoff between former State Rep. Lee Anderson and Greg Grzybowski to advance to November’s General Election against Democrat Brenda Jor­dan.

More National Convention News

Georgia Delegate to the Republican National Convention Jade Morey spoke to WGXA about her experiences in Cleveland.

State Senator Michael Williams, an early Trump supporter, spoke to the Forsyth News about the Convention.

“It went fantastic,” said state Sen. Michael Williams, a Georgia delegate and early Trump supporter, on Friday. “It was extremely energetic.

People left last night just absolutely in love with Donald Trump and ready to go out there and work hard for him.”

Williams, who represents District 27 in Forsyth, said the majority of the party is behind Trump.

“We still have a very, very small contingent that is not on board with Donald Trump,” he said. “But for the vast, vast majority, 95 percent of us, we left there completely energized and ready to go out there.”

Yesterday in Philadelphia, now-former Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz was booed offstage in her own state’s delegation meeting. I guess Democrats heard that Politico called the GOP the “Worst Convention in U.S. History” and took that as a challenge.

Georgia Congressman Hank Johnson disgraced himself, his political party, and his constituents when he referred to Jewish settlers in the West Bank as “termites.”

A poll indicates that Georgia may be in play in November at the Presidential election level, but I won’t lose any sleep over it.

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Adoptable (Official) Georiga Dogs for July 25, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/25/adoptable-official-georiga-dogs-for-july-25-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adoptable-official-georiga-dogs-for-july-25-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/25/adoptable-official-georiga-dogs-for-july-25-2016/#comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 11:58:28 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55659 GaPundit:

All adoption fees are waived today for dogs over 25 pounds and all cats at the DeKalb County Animal Services and Fulton County Animal Services shelters. Naka is a four-year old female terrier mix who is available for adoption from DeKalb County Animal Services. Naka is a happy four year old girl who loves going

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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GaPundit:

All adoption fees are waived today for dogs over 25 pounds and all cats at the DeKalb County Animal Services and Fulton County Animal Services shelters.

Naka

Naka is a four-year old female terrier mix who is available for adoption from DeKalb County Animal Services.

Naka is a happy four year old girl who loves going for walks, exploring new places, and hanging out with her people. She knows how to sit and would love to learn more. Her adoption is FREE and includes her spay, microchip, vaccinations, and more!

BearDeKalb

Bear is a two-year old male Terrier mix who is available for adoption from DeKalb County Animal Services.

Bear is a handsome two year old who is determined to find his forever home. He is a confident boy who doesn’t let anything slow him down. When you talk to him in a sweet voice he totally melts. He loves to sniff around in the grass and dreams of having outdoor adventures with his forever family. He hasn’t gotten along with dogs here at the shelter, but may do well with the right dog in a forever home. Feel free to bring your dog in for a supervised meet and greet.

Mighty

Mighty is a three-year old Terrier mix who weighs 41 pounds and is available for adoption from Fulton County Animal Services.

Mighty is a frightened little guy. He cowers and shakes when you approach him. He has never shown any aggression with people and does loosen up after spending time with him. He allows touch and seems to enjoy it. We are housing him alone as to not further stress him out at this point. He needs a quiet place that can allow him time to decompress and gain some much needed confidence.

Carson

Carson is a young male Labrador Retriever puppy who is available for adoption from Fulton County Animal Services.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 25, 2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/25/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-25-2016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-25-2016 http://gapundit.com/2016/07/25/georgia-politics-campaigns-and-elections-for-july-25-2016/#comments Mon, 25 Jul 2016 11:27:19 +0000 http://gapundit.com/?p=55658 GaPundit:

James Oglethorpe, founder of Georgia, left the colony for the last time on July 23, 1743, returning to England. On July 24, 1778, Georgia ratified the Articles of Confederation. Georgia’s John Walton was present on July 9, 1778, and signed the document then. Georgia’s other two delegates – Edward Telfair and Edward Langworthy – did

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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GaPundit:

James Oglethorpe, founder of Georgia, left the colony for the last time on July 23, 1743, returning to England.

On July 24, 1778, Georgia ratified the Articles of Confederation.

Georgia’s John Walton was present on July 9, 1778, and signed the document then. Georgia’s other two delegates – Edward Telfair and Edward Langworthy – did not sign until July 24, 1778, which is the date most often used for Georgia’s ratification of the Articles.

An interesting sidenote is that John Walton‘s brother, George Walton, signed the Declaration of Independence on Georgia’s behalf.

On July 24, 1919, the Georgia General Assembly rejected ratification of the 19th Amendment, which extends the right of voting to women.

The All-Star Game was held in Atlanta on July 25, 1972, with the National League winning 4-3 in ten innings.

On July 25, 1974, the United States Supreme Court ruled in the case of United States v. Nixon that executive privilege did not allow the White House to refuse to turn over audio recordings that had been subpoenaed by a special prosecutor investigating the Watergate scandal.

On July 22, 1975, the United States House of Representatives voted to restore U.S. Citizenship to General Robert E. Lee posthumously.

Though President Andrew Johnson issued a proclamation of amnesty and pardon to the Southern rebels in 1865, it required Lee to apply separately. On Oct. 2, 1865, the same day that Lee was inaugurated as president of Washington College in Lexington, Va., he signed the required amnesty oath and filed an application through Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

Nonetheless, neither was Lee pardoned, nor was his citizenship restored. After receiving it, Secretary of State William Seward gave Lee’s application to a friend as a souvenir. Meanwhile, State Department officials, apparently with Seward’s approval, pigeonholed the oath.

In 1970, an archivist, examining State Department records at the National Archives, found Lee’s lost oath. That discovery helped set in motion a five-year congressional effort to restore citizenship to the general, who had died stateless in 1870.

President Gerald Ford signed the congressional resolution on July 24, 1975, correcting what he said was a 110-year oversight. The signing ceremony took place at Arlington House in Virginia, the former Lee family home. Several Lee descendants, including Robert E. Lee V, his great-great-grandson, attended.

On July 24, 2000, former Georgia Governor Zell Miller was appointed to the United States Senate to serve in the seat vacated on the death of Senator Paul Coverdell.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

According to the mainstream media, the 2016 Republican National Convention was “negative,” “mean,” riven with “fear,” and “The Worst Convention in History.” It might have looked negative and mean if your name is “Hillary Clinton,” but I disagree with almost everything being written about the convention to the extent that I wonder if any of those folks actually attended the same event I was at.

Yes, Ted Cruz’s speech got booed. I might suspect it was organized, but if it was, it would have been the single most well-organized event at the convention with the exception of the buses running between hotels and the convention center.

But for those of us who were Republicans, it was a great event. The City of Cleveland got rave reviews, as did Cleveland law enforcement, which was supplemented by federal, state, and local officers from across the nation.

Jade Morey, a Georgia Delegate, wrote on Facebook,

It’s hard for the Republican Party to get a message of inclusion out when the media literally refuses to print/air it. Can’t tell you how many times I gave interviews this weekend and they don’t want to hear it. They want divisive, crazy quotes. Their view of the convention was in some ways a stark contrast from my personal experience. Never ceases to amaze me how far they will go to push their bias. #RNCinCLE‬

At the Convention, Ginger Howard took her seat as Republican National Committeewoman for Georgia.

Houston County Republicans support Trump in the General Election, according to WGXA.

“What our message is, is to go out and educate people on what Mr. Trump really stands for and that’s why I said you have to get beyond what you hear and get beyond what you see,” said [Vivian] Childs.

Houston County Republican Party 2nd Vice Chair Bethany Ballard is in charge of recruiting guest speakers. She explained her reasoning for inviting Smith and Childs to the group’s meeting was to show everyone that Trump is for the younger generation as well as minorities.

“It’s hard to get millennials out to the polls sometimes. Sometimes the young people seem very excited about elections and they’re very vocal but then they don’t show up on election day,” said Ballard.

Ballard explained she herself was not always a Trump supporter.

“It was a hard decision to support Trump but I decided in the end that Trump is the best choice for America going forward,” said Ballard.

Childs believes GOP voters of all ages should stand with one another to support their nominee.

Jentezen Franklin of the Free Chapel in Gainesville spoke to the Gainesville Times about his role on a committee advising GOP nominee Donald Trump on evangelical issues.

“I see my role on the committee as representing the evangelical community in general, but also the voices of the men and women in my church and every church that can’t be heard by Mr. Trump or be in that circle,” said Franklin, who has led Free Chapel for nearly 25 years ago, seeing it grow to include campuses nationwide.

For Franklin, whose ministry includes a national TV program, “Kingdom Connection,” his work on the committee began several months ago with an invitation via a phone call from the campaign.

“They made it clear (serving on the committee) was not an endorsement but that it would be basically a listening session,” he said. “(Trump) was interested in the concerns and fears of the evangelical community.”

The initial meeting was scheduled to last an hour but went on for three. The group, comprising 15 prominent pastors and others, gathered with Trump around a long conference table.

Trump “was very attentive,” Franklin said. “He has one persona on television, but when you get in a room with him, he’s actually a very good listener. And the people who were there spoke very bluntly — I would even call it, at times, confrontational.

“We understand that anytime we get those kinds of calls from politicians, it’s got to do with votes, too.”

The group could continue to meet monthly until the Nov. 8 election.

However, if he’s elected, “he has indicated that he absolutely wants to have an ear to the evangelical community through this executive committee,” Franklin said.

I’ll be writing more about the convention over the coming days, and hopefully speaking to a few more members of the delegation. But we’ve got business to do in Georgia with the Primary Runoffs tomorrow.

Primary Runoff Elections Tuesday

After his speech in Cleveland at the Republican National Convention, Ted Cruz headed to Georgia, where he headlined a rally for Mike Crane in the Third Congressional District.

“He understands that freedom matters. He’ll speak the truth, and he is a fighter,” said Cruz, stumping for the hometown District 3 congressional hopeful in front of a packed house at the Newnan Centre.

Shouts of “Amen!” and “That’s right!” marked a far friendlier reception than the one in Cleveland two days earlier, when the initially supportive crowd became outraged, erupting in boos and chants of “We want Trump!” after Cruz shattered the unified image that his party had struggled to establish by refusing to formally endorse the Republican presidential nominee.

Crane stood nearby as Cruz gave him a glowing endorsement.

“You need someone with a body part that not very many people have these days,” Cruz said. “A backbone. Mike Crane has a backbone.”

Cruz arrived in Newnan just before 6 p.m. Friday to help fire up Crane’s supporters for Tuesday’s runoff, where he will face former West Point Mayor Drew Ferguson. Crane and Ferguson essentially tied in a seven-man Republican primary in May. The runoff is for the nomination and the chance to face Democratic nominee Angela Pendley in November.

11Alive spoke to Cruz at the event.

I asked Crane if there was any hesitation to bring Cruz down after his speech.

“Hesitation? No, I would have driven him down myself,” Crane said, “you don’t abandon your friends.”

Crane was an early supporter of Cruz. Though, now he says he supports Trump.

“I thought he did a great speech, he congratulated Donald, and he encouraged everyone to get out and vote in November and vote for the constitutional officers up and down the ballot,” Crane said, “for me, that says wholeheartedly, let’s vote for Donald Trump.”

While Cruz didn’t speak about Donald Trump, he did speak speak about party unity.
“The way we unite and the way we win in November, is we come together to defend freedom,” Cruz said.

Atlanta Magazine inverviewed Mike Boyce about his runoff election against incumbent Cobb County Commission Chair Tim Lee.

On January 3, Boyce launched a campaign to unseat Cobb Chairman Tim Lee. He had a simple plan: Six days a week, the 66-year-old political novice knocked on doors as his mostly volunteer team called voters from a phone bank set up in the basement of his brick ranch home. To date, Boyce’s “army” has reached out to more than 120,000 voters with a pledge to bring transparency back to the Cobb commission following the SunTrust Park deal in 2014. Five months after his campaign began, Boyce shocked political observers as the top vote-getter in the May Republican primary—coming within 400 votes of winning the seat outright.

You’ve emphasized how grassroots your campaign has been. How so, exactly?

I knew we had to do something different [than in 2012]. I had to find a campaign guru. I had to raise money. Nobody knew who I was; I had to fall back on my social network of people that supported me before, and my wife and I conducted a number of private dinners, and we told people why we needed their help. My secret weapon is my wife. Everybody in this army does something. Why our campaign has worked is that we guarantee that, when they show up to so something, we’re prepared for them. We don’t waste their time.

How many volunteers do you have at this point in time?

Well over 300. It’s hard for people to believe that the key to this campaign was that in January, three people—my campaign guru, manager, and a Kennesaw State intern—drove this campaign. We agreed on this strategy to go door-to-door unless something drastically changed. But my issue from day one has always been if you can vote on a $40 million park bond, why can’t we vote on a $350 million stadium bond?

The only thing harder than getting people to turn up to a primary is to get them to turn up to a runoff. What’s your strategy against a well-funded opponent?

It’s not about money. It’s about volunteers. The chairman has the money. I have the army. He’s got to buy his army. Mine walk in the door. There are people downstairs in my basement right now—and I have no idea who they are—who believe in this cause of representative government.

More than 13,000 absentee and advance voting ballots have been cast in the Cobb County runoff elections.

Through three weeks of advanced voting, 10,727 people cast a ballot in person and 2,367 mailed one in, according to unaudited numbers from Cobb Elections. Bucking a trend with runoff elections, the number of early votes surpasses the number who voted early in the primary, when just 9,894 people voted in person and 1,752 mailed in a ballot — a total of 11,646 early votes.

The ballot for the July 26 runoff election features Cobb Chairman Tim Lee squaring off against retired Marine Col. Mike Boyce for the Republican nomination for the chairman’s seat as well as a race between local attorneys John Morgan and Kellie Hill for a seat on the county’s State Court.

Two seats on the Muscogee County Board of Education will be decided tomorrow.

In the District 1 race, three-term incumbent Pat Hugley Green faces retired educator JoAnn Thomas-Brown.

Green, an insurance agent and chief administrator for Hugley’s Facility Management and Janitorial Service, is the board’s vice chairwoman and chairs the finance committee. She is the sister of Columbus City Manager Isaiah Hugley and the sister-in-law of state Rep. Carolyn Hugley, D-Columbus. Green received 46.62 percent of the district’s 2,651 votes in the May 24 election.

Thomas-Brown is owner and chief executive officer of B&O services, which provides support and a group home for the intellectually disabled. She worked 36 years in the Muscogee County School District, including as principal of Baker Middle School, and earned a place in the runoff by finishing second in the three-way race with 29.95 percent. Al Stewart, another retired educator, came in third with 23.35 percent. There were two write-in votes.

District 7 representative Shannon Smallman, a real estate broker, didn’t seek re-election to a second term. She instead is campaign manager for Cathy Williams, president and chief executive officer of NeighborWorks Columbus, which promotes and provides access to fit and affordable housing.

Cathy Williams, the wife of Ledger-Enquirer senior reporter Chuck Williams, received 46.04 percent of the district’s 1,173 votes in the May 24 election. Her runoff opponent is Shelia Williams, who works with Thomas-Brown as executive director of B&O Services.

Shelia Williams also has been a team leader and support coordinator for Columbus Community Services, an online adjunct criminal justice instructor for Troy University at Fort Benning and a lead teacher for Easter Seals of West Georgia. Shelia Williams received 32.91 percent of the District 7 vote May 24 to qualify for the runoff.

Madison County voters will decide on runoff elections for Sheriff and County Commission Chair.

In the Madison County sheriff’s race, Sheriff Kip Thomas is being challenged by former Deputy Michael Moore in the Republican primary runoff.

Thomas led May balloting with 2,242 of the 4,827 votes cast, but that got him just slightly more than 46 percent of the vote, short of the 50 percent plus 1 vote needed to claim victory. Moore earned 32 percent of the vote, while the third candidate in the contest, David Larkins, took 21 percent.

There are no Democrats in the race, so Tuesday’s vote will determine the new sheriff in Madison County.

In the Madison County Commission chairman’s race, John Scarborough and Stanley Thomas emerged as the top two vote-getters in the Republican primary, with Scarborough claiming 25 percent of the 4,680 ballots cast and Thomas earning 24 percent of the vote in a five-way contest that resulted from long-time incumbent Anthony Dove’s decision not to seek re-election.

State Rep. John Yates (R-Griffin) is in the battle of his political lifetime for reelection against fellow Republican Karen Mathiak.

John Yates, still gets misty-eyed talking about his first election in 1989 as one of the Georgia House’s few Republicans. Now, during a primary runoff in what he has said would be his last re-election bid, the 94-year-old legislator from Griffin is trying to avoid an undignified exit from a state Legislature he helped turn red.

Defeat of Yates, the last World War II veteran still serving at the statehouse, would represent an end of an era at the Capitol and is one of the headline races in Tuesday’s statewide runoff election.

Yates, whose framed war medals line his second-floor Capitol office, is one of two prominent GOP House incumbents facing runoffs after failing to get enough votes in the state’s May general primary. The other is state Rep. Tom Dickson, a retired school superintendent from Whitfield County who fell 16 votes short of an outright win and now faces Chatsworth farmer Jason Ridley in the runoff.

I call it the battle of his political lifetime, not the biggest battle of his lifetime. That would probably be the Battle of the Bulge. You know, an actual battle. There are some fascinating videos online of this member of The Greatest Generation discussing his service in WWII.

In Cherokee County, Commission District Three will be decided between Bob Kovacs and Jack Staver.

Early voter turnout for the runoff was low, elections officials say, and the race could be decided by how many people the candidates persuade to cast their ballots on Election Day.

Elections Director Kim Stancil predicted that voter turnout in the race would be extremely low, as is typical in most runoffs. The fact that the District 3 race is the only one being contested, she said, lowered those expectations even more.

Both candidates have spent their evenings in recent months going door to door in their district to meet with voters in the hopes of gaining their support.

The two candidates say they have spoken to thousands of voters during their campaigns, but say the vast majority of the residents they have talked to are unaware that a runoff was even taking place.

Richmond County voters will decide on a new State Court Judge in tomorrow’s runoff elections.

The contest pits Robert “Bo” Hunter III against current Richmond County State Court Solicitor Kellie McIntyre.

The winner of the election will serve as one of four judges on the State Court bench where misdemeanor criminal cases, which include nearly all traffic offenses in Georgia, are handled, as well as civil lawsuits.

The Dawson County Commission will advertise a lower property tax millage rate for 2017 with three public hearings scheduled for August. Randall Dowling has resigned as Dawson County Manager, according to FetchYourNews.com.

GaPundit - Georgia Politics, Campaigns and Elections

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