Category: Georgia Political News

11
Dec

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 11, 2014

Coming Soon – GaPundit Pro App for iPhone/iPad 2.0 and for Android

The elves in the GaPundit.com workshop are working on developing Version 2.0 of our iPhone/iPad app and the first-ever Android version. It combines a cool directory of your State Senators and Representatives with tools to help get in touch with them, and delivery of the latest political news right to your smartphone.

We’re committed to keeping the free version available for our readers, and we have sponsorship opportunities to help keep it free – email me if you’re interested in sponsoring our App. It’s great for political junkies and professionals alike, as well as associations with active memberships who are involved in the political process.

We’re also interested in hearing what kind of features you’d like to see integrated into the latest version of Georgia’s Power Tool for Politics.

Georgia and American History

On December 11, 1777, during their movement to Valley Forge for the winter, Washington’s colonial forces engaged British troops under General Cornwallis as the Americans were crossing the Schuylkill River.

Indiana became the 19th State on December 11, 1816.

Governor Charles McDonald signed legislation on December 11, 1841 to prevent a person from having his or her testimony excluded in court because of the individual’s religious beliefs.

The first use of nitrous oxide as a dental anesthetic took place on December 11, 1844.

On December 11, 1872, Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback took office in Louisiana as the first black Governor in the United States.

A memorial service for Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America, was held in the Georgia State Capitol on December 11, 1889 while his funeral was that day in New Orleans.

On December 11, 1941, Germany declared war on the United States.

On December 11, 1960, a civil rights demonstration including 8000 African-American citizens was held in Atlanta as part of the movement to boycott stores that remained segregated.

The Libertarian Party was founded on December 11, 1971 in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Tonight at 7 PM at North Avenue Presbyterian Church in Atlanta, Senator Renee Unterman (R-Buford) will lead a candlelight vigil in support of “Safe Harbor” legislation for victims of sex trafficking. in conjunction with Street Grace, Wellspring Living, youthSpark and Georgia Cares.

Candlelight Vigil

This morning, Sen. Unterman will pre-file legislation in the Georgia Senate to further the protection of child victims. The “safe harbor” legislation will address inconsistencies in the prosecution of human trafficking cases at the state level, impose harsher punishments on those convicted of this terrible crime, and create a funding mechanism to provide for the care and rehabilitation of child sex trafficking victims.

“It has been a long four-year journey of advocacy, education, and sincere determination explaining to Georgia citizens exactly what is happening to vulnerable children in the child sex trafficking trade. House Bill 200, authored by former state Rep. Ed Lindsey, was a historic change to Georgia law that punishes criminals who prey on children by selling them for profit in the sex trade. This bill increased criminal penalties with prison terms and fines, as well as allowed confiscation of assets and affirmative defense,” said Sen. Unterman.Continue Reading..

8
Dec

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 8, 2014

President Abraham Lincoln issued his Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction on December 8, 1863.

First, it allowed for a full pardon for and restoration of property to all engaged in the rebellion with the exception of the highest Confederate officials and military leaders.

Second, it allowed for a new state government to be formed when 10 percent of the eligible voters had taken an oath of allegiance to the United States.

Third, the Southern states admitted in this fashion were encouraged to enact plans to deal with the freed slaves so long as their freedom was not compromised.

On December 8, 1899, Georgia Governor Allen Candler signed legislation to levy a tax on all dogs older than four months.

The United States declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941. Montana Congresswoman Jeanette Rankin, the first female elected to the United States House of Representatives, cast the sole dissenting vote.

John Lennon was shot and killed outside his apartment building in New York City on December 8, 1980.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

CANDIDATE FORUM TONIGHT FOR HD50 SPECIAL ELECTION: The Johns Creek Community Association is hosting a Candidate Forum today, Monday, December 8, 2014 for the special election to fill the Georgia House District 50 seat. The election will be held on January 6, 2015 and early voting begins on December 15 at the Johns Creek Environmental Center.

This forum will be your only opportunity to hear all 5 candidates answer your questions. The Forum will be held at the Thornhill Clubhouse.

You can meet the candidates at 6:30 PM and the Q&A will begin at 7:00 PM.

Former President George W. Bush (43) was in Valdosta last week at Moody Air Force Base, signing copies of his book, 41: A Portrait of My Father.

Hundreds of people lined up at Moody’s Base Exchange for hours, just to get the opportunity to shake George W. Bush’s hand and get a signed copy of his new book.

“It’s an opportunitiy of a lifetime to come and get the chance to shake his hand and thank him for his service to the country”, says Marla Haag, a Book Signing Attendee.

“I’m most excited to hopefully shake his hand. That was my ultimate goal”, says Staff Sergeant, Kyle Pantermoller.

41: Portraits Of My Father is the Former President’s second book, and is a biography of his father, George Bush Senior. Though politics aren’t discussed in the book, it gives a unique look in to presidential life… which is one reason why Staff Sergeant Pantermoller says he was excited to read it.

Continue Reading..

5
Dec

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 5, 2014

On December 5, 1765, the British ship Speedwell arrived in Savannah with supplies for implementing the Stamp Act.

Georgia voters approved a new state Constitution, the seventh in state history, on December 5, 1877; also approved on the statewide ballot was to keep the state capital in Atlanta instead of returning it to Milledgeville. Notably, Section II, Paragraph V of the 1877 Constitution read:

“Lobbying is declared to be a crime, and the General Assembly shall enforce this provision by suitable penalties.”

On December 5, 1933, the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Utah ratified the 21st Amendment to the Constitution, repealing Prohibition under the 18th Amendment. FDR ran for President in 1932 supporting repeal.

On December 5, 1941, ten state institutions of higher learning, including the University of Georgia and Georgia Tech, lost their accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools due to political meddling by Gov. Eugene Talmadge.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Today at 10 AM, the DeKalb County Board of Commissioners will hold a meeting to introduce Commissioner-elect Nancy Jester, who will be the only Republican on the County Commission.

4
Dec

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 4, 2014

On December 4, 1783, General George Washington told his officers he would resign his commission and return to his life at Mount Vernon.

The Battle of Waynesboro, Georgia was fought between Wheeler’s Confederate cavalry and Kilpatrick’s federal troops on December 4, 1864.

Governor William Northen signed legislation placing on the statewide ballot a constitutional amendment to increase the number of Georgia Supreme Court Justices from 3 to 5 on December 4, 1893.

On December 4, 1932, a 12-foot tall statue of Tom Watson, former state legislator, Congressman, and United States Senator from Georgia, was placed on the State Capitol Grounds.

On December 4, 1945, the United States Senate voted to approve full U.S. participation in the United Nations. Georgia’s Senators voted in favor.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Mike Young, previously Mayor of Helena, Georgia, will serve as the first Mayor of McRae-Helena, a combined city, after winning a runoff election.

In a pretty odd situation, Robert Goff won the runoff election for Dade County Commission District 3, with 475 votes to 272 for incumbent Rick Breeden.

Goff previously represented District 3 on the County Commission. He resigned last March in order to run for a spot in the statehouse against Georgia Rep. John Deffenbaugh.

After the loss, Goff decided to run for the commission seat he’d given up.

“To carry the county again under the circumstances, it’s an honor to me,” he said.

Because Goff resigned from the commission midterm, he will only serve on the County Commission for another two years before there will be another general election for two commissioner seats, as well as the county mayor.

Breeden, the man who replaced Goff after Goff’s resignation, said he is fine with the outcome. He said he only stepped up after community members asked him to.

Ashley Durrence was elected Chairman of the Tattnall County Commission in a runoff election with 63 percent of the vote to 37 percent for Keith Dixon.

Rob Simms will take the reins of the National Republican Congressional Committee, according to Politico:

Coming off a big win on Election Day, the National Republican Congressional Committee — the campaign arm of House Republicans — will move its political director, Rob Simms, up to executive director.

“Rob was instrumental in helping us win this historic majority and now he’s going to lead our efforts to keep it and help Members build the best campaigns possible,” said NRCC Chairman Greg Walden (Ore.) said in a statement.

“I am honored to have the opportunity to work with Chairman Greg Walden again and look forward to continuing to be a part of our outstanding team at the NRCC,” Simms said. “Chairman Walden and I want to build upon the improvements we made in 2014, and engineer a stronger committee and an even stronger majority.”

Simms served as Georgia’s deputy secretary of state from 2007-09, and has been involved in multiple congressional and gubernatorial campaigns.

Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens has joined the 17-state lawsuits against President Obama’s Executive Amnesty.

The 17-state coalition led by Texas is suing over Obama’s recently announced executive actions on immigration, arguing in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that the move “tramples” key portions of the U.S. Constitution.

Merry Hunter Hipp, communications specialist in Gov. Nathan Deal’s office, directed questions about Georgia’s involvement to the state’s Attorney General’s Office.

“We are a nation of immigrants, and I value the many contributions made to our country by immigrants. We are also a nation of laws,” said Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens in a statement.

“As the complaint itself states, ‘This lawsuit is not about immigration. It is about the rule of law, presidential power, and enforcement of the U.S. Constitution.’ There is no question that immigration reform is needed. However, President Obama’s unconstitutional, short-term action only adds to uncertainty faced by those wishing to live in our country.”

 

Deal rings in a new tradition

Georgia Liberty Bell photo by Georgia Building Authority

Photo by Georgia Building Authority

Governor Nathan Deal will ring Georgia’s replica of the Liberty Bell to mark the opening of his inauguration ceremony on January 12, 2015.

“The Liberty Bell, much like Liberty Plaza, has historical significance to our state,” Deal said. “It was intended for use at patriotic occasions, and we look forward to restoring that tradition. It is my hope that the Liberty Bell will become part of Georgia’s inaugural ceremony for years to come.”

Continue Reading..

1
Dec

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for December 1, 2014

General George Washington set up winter headquarters at Morristown, New Jersey on December 1, 1779.

On November 30, 1782, British and American signed a preliminary treaty in Paris to end the American Revolution, which included withdrawal of British troops and recognition of American independence.

Georgia ratified the Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution on November 29, 1794, which reads,

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state.

The election for President of the United States, in which no candidate received a majority of electoral votes, went to the United States House of Representatives on December 1, 1824.

Andrew Jackson of Tennessee won 99 electoral and 153,544 popular votes; John Quincy Adams–the son of John Adams, the second president of the United States–received 84 electoral and 108,740 popular votes; Secretary of State William H. Crawford, who had suffered a stroke before the election, received 41 electoral votes; and Representative Henry Clay of Virginia won 37 electoral votes.

As dictated by the Constitution, the election was then turned over to the House of Representatives. The 12th Amendment states that if no electoral majority is won, only the three candidates who receive the most popular votes will be considered in the House. Representative Henry Clay, who was disqualified from the House vote as a fourth-place candidate, agreed to use his influence to have John Quincy Adams elected.

On November 29, 1947, the United Nations passed a resolution to partition Palestine and allow the creation of a Jewish state of Israel.

The Tawana Brawley case began on November 28, 1987; the greatest lasting impact would be the rise to celebrity of community activist the Rev. Al Sharpton.

The City of Sandy Springs began operations at one second after midnight on December 1, 2005. Three years later, Dunwoody became a new city, on December 1, 2008.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Columbia County voters will return to the polls tomorrow, December 5, 2014, in the runoff elections for Commission District 3.

District 3 polling places will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Dec. 2.

Trip Derryberry, a Martin­ez businessman, and Mack Taylor, a lawyer and former assistant district attorney, were the top two vote-getters Nov. 4 in the field of four vying to fill the seat vacated by Charles Allen, who resigned in March.

DeKalb County voters will choose between Republican Nancy Jester and Independent Holmes Pyles for the County Commission District 1 seat vacated after former Commissioner Elaine Boyer resigned and pled guilty to official corruption charges.Continue Reading..

26
Nov

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 26, 2014

President George Washington declared November 26, 1789 the first “public day of thanksgiving and prayer.”

By the President of the United States of America, a Proclamation.

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor; and—Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me “to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:”

Now, therefore, I do recommend and assign Thursday, the 26th day of November next, to be devoted by the people of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be; that we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection of the people of this country previous to their becoming a nation; for the signal and manifold mercies and the favor, able interpositions of His providence in the course and conclusion of the late war; for the great degree of tranquillity, union, and plenty which we have since enjoyed; for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national one now lately instituted; for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed, and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and, in general, for all the great and various favors which He has been pleased to confer upon us.

And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other trangressions; to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually; to render our National Government a blessing to all the people by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed; to protect and guide all sovereigns and nations (especially such as have shown kindness to us), and to bless them with good governments, peace, and concord; to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us; and, generally, to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as He alone knows to be best.

Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.

Go. Washington

On November 26, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Fourth Thursday in November as the modern Thanksgiving celebration.

[I]t was not until 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving to fall on the last Thursday of November, that the modern holiday was celebrated nationally.

With a few deviations, Lincoln’s precedent was followed annually by every subsequent president–until 1939. In 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt departed from tradition by declaring November 23, the next to last Thursday that year, as Thanksgiving Day. Considerable controversy surrounded this deviation, and some Americans refused to honor Roosevelt’s declaration. For the next two years, Roosevelt repeated the unpopular proclamation, but on November 26, 1941, he admitted his mistake and signed a bill into law officially making the fourth Thursday in November the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day.

On the same day, a Japanese navy fleet left port headed toward Pearl Harbor.

Transportation Funding

Senator Johnny Isakson wrote in the AJC that the federal government should consider moving to user fees to pay for transportation infrastructure.

With drivers buying less gasoline, the revenue coming into the Highway Trust Fund has dropped. Given these factors and recent trends, it is likely our gas consumption will continue to decline. Simply raising the tax rate on a declining revenue source isn’t the solution for our long-term infrastructure needs.

In 2015, we have a real opportunity to repair this broken trust fund and find a new formula that fits the needs of 21st century America. It is time we change the trust fund model to a “user-pays” system. Everyone who uses the roads and other modes of transportation financed through the trust fund should pay into the system.

I also support letting states set their own infrastructure funding priorities. While the federal government should prioritize projects important to the nation as a whole, states have a much better sense of their day-to-day infrastructure needs, and they should be given the flexibility to direct the use of gas tax revenues collected within their borders.

One way a user fee for highways can work is seen on I-85 in Gwinnett County, where a Peach Pass gets you access to the HOT lanes, which are usually moving faster than the prole lanes. Remember how that went over when it first started?

#FergusonAtl

Barricades CapitolSM

Last night, some Atlanta residents took to the street to protest the decision by a Missouri grand jury declining to indict a police office.

Continue Reading..

25
Nov

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 25, 2014

On November 25, 1864, Sherman’s 14th and 20th Corps moved toward Sandersville while the 17th Corps fought briefly against a mix of Kentucky Militia, Georgia Military Institute cadets, and Georgia convicts.

On November 25, 1867, Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel filed a patent for dynamite. On November 25, 1895, Nobel wrote his will, leaving the equivalent of roughly $186 million (2008 dollars) to endow the Nobel prizes.

On November 25, 1920, the first play-by-play broadcast of a college football game took place at College Station as Texas A&M (then Mechanical College of Texas) took the field against Texas University.

President John F. Kennedy was buried at Arlington National Cemetery on November 25, 1963.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience played its first show at the Bag O’Nails Club in London on November 25, 1966.

Ferguson

A rally will be held at Five Points in Downtown Atlanta today from 5 to 9 PM to address concerns about the Ferguson decision. Will reporters outnumber protesters?

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Michelle Nunn told the AJC that she’s not quite Dunn with politics and might be up for a future Runn for office.

“I feel we ran a good campaign. I feel proud of it. We had a great team – volunteers and staff,” she began. “You spend the first few days being disappointed. Then you spend the next few days feeling a lot of gratitude for the experience. And then you start to get into the analysis of it. I think that will go on for some time.”

When asked if she had another statewide race in her, Nunn’s reply was again studied.

“I will stay involved in service. That’s been the trajectory of my whole career,” she said. But politics?

“I’m certainly invested in continuing to build the kind of Georgia electorate that I think would be most healthy for our state – a two-party dialogue, one that engages more and more people,” Nunn said. “I’ll just leave open the possibility of electoral office.”

Continue Reading..

24
Nov

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 24, 2014

The only major battle on Sherman’s March to the Sea occurred at Griswoldsville on November 22, 1864; on the same day, federal troops marched into Milledgeville.

Milledgeville-Old-Governor-Mansion-3

On November 23, 1864, Sherman himself entered Milledgeville, where used the Governor’s Mansion as his headquarters. Sherman’s forces left the capitol city on November 24th.

President John F. Kennedy became the fourth President of the United States to be assassinated in office on November 22, 1963. The next day, Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald, who had been arrested for shooting Kennedy.

Construction on the Georgia Dome began on November 24, 1989.

On November 24, 1992, Republican Paul D. Coverdell defeated Democratic incumbent Wyche Fowler in the runoff election for United States Senate.

Paul_D.Coverdell

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Early voting continues this week in the runoff election for DeKalb County Commission District One.

Advance Voting – 4380 Memorial Drive Location Only
M-F November 17-26, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
(Office closed for Thanksgiving 11/27-28)

Early voting also continues in the runoff election for Columbia County Commission District 3.

Elections Director Nancy Gay said early voting will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Nov. 26 at the Board of Elections office, 500 Faircloth Drive, Building E, in Evans.

Elections Director Nancy Gay said the last day for absentee ballots to be mailed out is Wednesday, November 26; they must be turned in by Dec. 2.  There will be no weekend voting, Gay said.

The election will be limited to voters who live in District 3 and were eligible to vote in the Nov. 4 election. District 3 polling places will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Dec. 2.

Trip Derryberry, a Martin­ez businessman, and Mack Taylor, a lawyer and former assistant district attorney, were the top two vote-getters Nov. 4 in the field of four vying to fill the seat vacated by Charles Allen, who resigned in March.

The funeral for the late Governor Carl Sanders this weekend included a who’s who of the state’s political luminaries and was written up nicely by Walter Jones of Morris News:

A large crowd filled a downtown Atlanta church Saturday for the memorial service for Carl Sanders, an Augusta native who had served as governor in the height of the Civil Rights Movement.

All living former governors, including ex-President Jimmy Carter, were present. But only Roy Barnes spoke.

Sanders was elected the same day as George Wallace was in Alabama, Barnes noted. And where Wallace was defiant in opposing desegregation, Sanders was accepting. And although Birmingham and Atlanta were similar sizes at the time, they aren’t any long thanks to Sanders’s approach, Barnes said.

“Business does what it always does: it seeks safety and security and stability, and it came here to Atlanta and Georgia,” he said.

“Because of Carl Sanders, this metropolitan area has 3 1/2 million people, and the metropolitan area of Birmingham, Ala., has 700,000.”

Gov. Nathan Deal, who has described Sanders as a mentor, spoke barely a minute.

“Greatness is history’s label of approval, and it is bestowed on very few,” he said. “As we remember the life of Gov. Carl Sanders, we are also laying history’s wreath of greatness at his feet.”

Sanders served as governor 1963-67 as a Democrat. A political moderate, he chose not to fight court-ordered racial desegregation as neighboring governors did. As a result, he often said, Northern businesses considered Georgia a more friendly place to locate their factories and warehouses, helping the state to prosper and outpace surrounding states.

He appointed many blacks to positions within state government, and there were many blacks on hand at the memorial service to say their thanks and chat with the family afterward.

Last week, while taping “Political Rewind,” I got to listen to former Gov. Barnes and former Congressman Buddy Darden talk about Gov. Sanders and his legacy to the state. Click here to listen.

Christina Cassidy of the Associated Press spoke to Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp about the proposed SEC Presidential Primary in 2016.

Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp is among those pushing a regional March 1, 2016, contest dubbed the “SEC Primary,” named after the Southeastern Conference and which would include Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi and possibly Alabama and Louisiana.

“As someone who went to the University of Georgia and lives in Athens and understands how powerful the Southeastern Conference is in football today, that is exactly what we want to be when it comes to presidential politics,” Kemp said.

With the South being a strong voting bloc for Republicans, officials say an early primary date would give them an important say in who the GOP nominee should be and would comply with rules put forward by the Republican National Committee that allows states willing to carve up their delegates proportionally to hold their nominating contests March 1. States that prefer winner-take-all must still wait until March 15.

Both Georgia and Tenn­essee are set on the March 1, 2016, date. Tennessee lawmakers passed legislation in 2011 designating the first Tuesday in March for presidential primaries. Officials in Arkansas and Mississippi say they are working to move their primary.

Part of the draw, says Kemp, is that a cluster of states would make it easier for candidates to visit multiple states at a time and spend money on advertising in TV markets that cross state lines. And because they would be early states, candidates might be lured into hiring local staff who will become key assets if they secure the nomination, Kemp said.

“It gives the South a lot of influence in national political decisions,” Kemp said.

General Assembly 2015

Normally, we wouldn’t spend too much time on legislation that’s unlikely to pass, but two bills that have been dropped by Rep. Tyrone Brooks (D-Atlanta) will be in the spotlight because the further the Democratic party’s national narrative.

House Bill 8, co-sponsored by Rep. Dewey McClain (D-Lawrenceville) would raise the state minimum wage.

Except as otherwise provided in this Code section, every employer, whether a person, firm, or corporation, shall pay to all covered employees a minimum wage which shall be not less than $5.15 $6.20 per hour for each hour worked in the employment of such employer. As of the effective date of this Code section, the minimum wage shall be not less than $15.00 per hour for each hour worked in the employment of such employer. On January 1, 2016, and on January 1 of each successive year thereafter, the minimum wage shall be increased by the increase in the cost of living, if any.

In reading legislation, strikethrough is used to convey irony show deletions and underlining indicates language added to statute. HB 8 also deletes several exemptions from the state minimum wage law.

House Bill 9, co-sponsored by Rep. Keisha Waites (D-Atlanta) would “Ban the Box,” or remove any questions about an applicant’s criminal history from job application forms, though such information could be sought in an interview. Last year, a spokesperson for Gov. Deal told local media that an Executive Order would issue prohibiting state agencies from making such inquiries on job applications. I couldn’t locate an actual Executive Order that has been issued.

Here’s some background on the issue in Georgia:

Deal was inspired to ban the box on the recommendation of the Criminal Justice Reform Council, Dlugolenski said, which the governor established in 2011 with the goal to “protect public safety and hold offenders accountable while controlling state costs.”

One of its members was former state Rep. Jay Neal, a Republican from LaFayette, Ga.

Neal stepped down from the council after the governor appointed him last year as executive director of the state’s new Office of Transition, Support and Re-entry. That agency works to reduce recidivism among criminals, enhance public safety and ensure that the state’s convicted offenders can successfully re-enter society.

Georgia wants to “lead by example,” Neal said, and restrict ban the box to state jobs, instead of making private business comply.

“We did not want to tell private business what they could put on job applications,” Neal said.

No legislation has been proposed yet by the Joint Study Committee on Critical Transportation Infrastructure Funding, though a proposal is expected by the end of this month.

The panel has traveled the state, holding eight public hearings, but now it must actually produce a set of recommendations that leaders of the House and Senate have promised will be “significant” and “bold.”

While there were few clues given at Thursday’s final committee meeting, panelists heard a variety of concerns and suggestions, especially about the growing impact that hybrid and electric vehicles have on the state’s bottom line. The more fuel-efficient the car, the less gasoline is purchased. The less gasoline purchased means the less collected in gas taxes for transportation projects.

“All of these new types of vehicles are coming on the market, and we as a state and a country are offering tax incentives for people to buy them on one hand,” Rome City Commissioner Buzz Wachsteter said. “But on the other hand, what are we doing? We’re taking away the revenue that was being produced by conventional vehicles that use motor fuel to provide revenue.”

Lawmakers on the panel seemed sympathetic. State Rep. Mark Hamilton, R-Cumming, said afterward that the committee heard a presentation from leaders in Florida, where electric vehicle owners are charged an annual fee to make up for the loss of gas taxes. While Hamilton mentioned a $250 fee during Thursday’s meeting, he said later that the number was just an example and not a proposal.

Event Calendar


Joint Study Committee: Property Tax Digest Impact on Education Funding

November 24 @ 1:00 PM2:00 PM

State Capitol – Room 450, 18 Capitol Square, Atlanta, GA 30339

+ Google Map

MEETING NOTICE TO:     JOINT STUDY COMMITTEE – PROPERTY TAX DIGEST IMPACT …

Find out more »

December 2014


$10

Barrow County GOP: Holiday Dinner with Rep. Paul Broun

December 1 @ 7:00 PM8:00 PM

Winder Woman’s Club, 15 W Midland Ave, Winder, GA 30680

+ Google Map

Annual Barrow County GOP Holiday Dinner Contact Ken Young for details. Guest Spe…

Find out more »


Election Day: GA State and Local General Runoff

December 2
Find out more »

General Election Run-Off

December 2 @ 7:00 AM7:00 PM
Find out more »

Barry Loudermilk Congress: Holiday Reception & Canned Food Drive

Louder
December 4 @ 5:00 PM7:00 PM

Loudermilk For Congress Office, 9898 Highway 92, Woodstock, GA

+ Google Map

Find out more »

Gilmer County GOP: Christmas Dinner

December 5 @ 6:00 PM8:00 PM

JJ’s Restaurant, 24 River Street, Ellijay, GA 30540

+ Google Map

You Are Invited to… The Gilmer County Republican Party’s Christmas Dinner …

Find out more »


$15 / $20

Fayette County GOP: Christmas Celebration

December 5 @ 6:30 PM7:30 PM

Fayette Event Center, 174 North Glynn St, Fayetteville, GA 30214

+ Google Map

Fayette County Republican Party cordially invites you to Event Center Ann…

Find out more »


35 / 40

Atlanta YR: Holiday Party

December 5 @ 8:00 PM

City Club of Buckhead, 3353 Peachtree Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30326

+ Google Map

  Mark your calendars for the best holiday event of the year, and get ready…

Find out more »


22nd Annual Dallas Christmas Parade, Walk/Ride with Rep. Gravley and Friends.

December 6 @ 12:00 PM3:30 PM

Dallas Elementary School

+ Google Map

Please join me and my campaign for the 22nd Annual Invitational Christmas Parade…

Find out more »


Greater Gwinnett GOP Women: Christmas Party

December 8 @ 6:30 PM9:00 PM

Long Horn Steakhouse, 800 Lawrenceville Suwanee Rd, Lawrenceville, GA 30043

+ Google Map

GGRW Christmas Party Bring a wrapped gift for the Gift Grab. Contact Peg Murray:…

Find out more »


Happy Birthday – Congressman Austin Scott

December 10

Happy Birthday – Congressman Austin Scott

Find out more »


Cherokee County GOP: Christmas Party

December 12 @ 6:30 PM9:00 PM

Towne Lake Hills HOA, 1007 Towne Lake Hls E, Woodstock, GA 20189

+ Google Map

  (This event will take the place of our December meeting!)Please join the …

Find out more »


Paulding County GOP: Christmas Party

December 12 @ 7:00 PM8:00 PM

Audrey’s Cafe, 105 Village Walk, Dallas, GA 30132

+ Google Map

Please join us on Friday, December 12th as we celebrate the Christmas holidays w…

Find out more »


Gwinnett County GOP: Christmas & Hanukkah Brunch

December 13 @ 10:00 AM12:00 PM

Summit Chase Country Club, 3197 Classic Drive, Snellville, GA 30078

+ Google Map

Christmas and Hanukkah Brunch

Find out more »


Rockdale County GOP: Christmas Luncheon

December 13 @ 12:00 PM3:00 PM

Honey Creek Golf Club, 635 Clubhouse Dr SE, Conyers, GA 30094

+ Google Map

Rockdale GOP Christmas Luncheon Contact: [email protected] for more infor…

Find out more »


FREE / UN-wrapped Gift

Jackson County GOP: Christmas Party

December 13 @ 6:00 PM7:00 PM

Jefferson Club House, 302 Longview Drive, Jefferson, GA 30549

+ Google Map

THE JACKSON COUNTY CHRISTMAS (YES FOLKS I SAID CHRISTMAS)  SANTA & MRS CLAUS…

Find out more »


Dedication of the Nativity Scene at the Capitol

December 15 @ 12:00 PM1:00 PM
State Capitol
Find out more »

Columbia County GOP & CSRA GOP Women’s Club: Christmas Party

December 15 @ 7:00 PM9:00 PM
CCRP CCFR

GAGOP 12th District Field Office, 2834 Washington Road,, Augusta, GA 30909

+ Google Map

Find out more »

Cobb Commissioner – Elect Bob Weatherford: Community Swearing-In Ceremony

December 17 @ 4:00 PM5:00 PM

bob w

Cobb County Board of Commisioners, 100 Cherokee Street, Marietta, GA 30090

+ Google Map

Find out more »

DeKalb County GOP: Ringing For Rick on Christmas Eve

December 24 @ 9:00 AM2:00 PM

Northlake Mall, 4800 Briarcliff Road, Atlanta, GA 30345

+ Google Map

Join the DeKalb County GOP on Christmas Eve for Ringing For Rick O…


21
Nov

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 21, 2014

Georgia History

On November 21, 1620 (November 11 under the calendar used then), the first governing document of the English colony at Plymouth, Massachusetts, the Mayflower Compact, was signed by most of the male passengers of the Mayflower.

Having undertaken, for the Glory of God, and advancements of the Christian faith and honor of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic; for our better ordering, and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.

The Georgia Trustees outlawed rum in the colony on November 21, 1733 after James Oglethorpe wrote them that it was responsible for sickness and death in Georgia. Two-hundred eighty-one years later, Richland Rum is being distilled with Georgia-grown sugar cane in Richland, Georgia.

North Carolina ratified the Constitution on November 21, 1789, becoming the twelfth state to do so.

On November 21, 1860 Governor Joseph Brown called a Secession Convention following the election of Abraham Lincoln as President.

November 21, 1922 was the first day of Rebecca Latimer Fulton’s service in the United States Senate from Georgia as the first woman to serve in that chamber.

Here are two TV ads from the 1970 campaign by Carl Sanders for Governor.

Yesterday, we taped Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Political Rewind early and it began with special guests former Governor Roy Barnes (D) and former Congressman Buddy Darden (D) discussing their experiences in Georgia politics with Carl Sanders. It was fun to hear first-hand stories of a time in Georgia politics that I’d only read about. The show will air today at 3 PM on WRAS 88.5 FM in Atlanta and statewide on the GPB radio network. If you enjoy Georgia history, you’ll enjoy the show.

Buddy Darden Roy Barnes

In the context of a movement to legalize the medicinal use of an oil derived from cannabis in Georgia, this clip of Jimmy Carter from 1977 is interesting.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

The first legislation of the 2015 Session of the Georgia General Assembly, House Bill 6, has been introduced by State Rep. Dar’shun Kendrick, to allow grades higher than 4.0 for AP, International Baccalaureate or dual credit courses. It would take a real overachiever to come up with something like that.

The Judicial Nominating Commission is accepting nominations for three vacancies on state courts:

Northern Judicial Circuit comprising Elbert, Franklin, Hart, Madison, and Oglethopre Counties

Coweta Judicial Circuit comprising Carroll, Coweta, Heard, Meriwether, and Troup Counties

Waycross Judicial Circuit comprising Bacon, Brantley, Charlton, Coffee, Pierce, and Ware Counties

Nominations for all three of the vacancies are due on or before December 29, 2014.

In Washington, Congressman Tom Graves (R-Upper Left-hand Corner) will serve as Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.

“I joined this committee because of the unique opportunity to fight for taxpayers and reform the federal government,” said Rep. Graves. “I want the Appropriations Committee to be known as a place where taxpayer dollars are saved, not spent. As the Legislative Branch Subcommittee chairman, I’ll have a prime opportunity to walk the conservative talk. It’s an honor to have Chairman Rogers and the House Majority entrust me with this major responsibility.”

Immigration

Yesterday’s big news mainly revolved around President Obama’s immigration speech. Here are reactions from some of Georgia’s members of Congress.

Continue Reading..

20
Nov

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 20, 2014

New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights on November 20, 1789.

Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Warm Springs, Georgia for the 22d time on November 20, 1931.

Duane Allman was born in Nashville, Tennessee on November 20, 1946.

President John F. Kennedy lifted the naval blockade of Cuba on November 20, 1962, ending the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Newt Gingrich was reelected Speaker of the House on November 20, 1996

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Mark your calendars: Brian Kemp will schedule Georgia’s 2016 Presidential Preference Election for March First.

Last week, Kemp told the five other secretaries of state he’s working with in establishing a so-called “SEC” regional primary (named after the powerhouse college sports conference) that he intends to schedule Georgia’s presidential primary for March 1, 2016—an authority he was granted by the state Legislature in 2011. Tennessee has already set March 1 as its primary day, while the other four states still need to act through their respective legislatures to do the same. Primaries in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi are currently slated for later in March, while Arkansas’s is set for May.

Continue Reading..