Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 21, 2014

Georgia History

On November 21, 1620 (November 11 under the calendar used then), the first governing document of the English colony at Plymouth, Massachusetts, the Mayflower Compact, was signed by most of the male passengers of the Mayflower.

Having undertaken, for the Glory of God, and advancements of the Christian faith and honor of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic; for our better ordering, and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.

The Georgia Trustees outlawed rum in the colony on November 21, 1733 after James Oglethorpe wrote them that it was responsible for sickness and death in Georgia. Two-hundred eighty-one years later, Richland Rum is being distilled with Georgia-grown sugar cane in Richland, Georgia.

North Carolina ratified the Constitution on November 21, 1789, becoming the twelfth state to do so.

On November 21, 1860 Governor Joseph Brown called a Secession Convention following the election of Abraham Lincoln as President.

November 21, 1922 was the first day of Rebecca Latimer Fulton’s service in the United States Senate from Georgia as the first woman to serve in that chamber.

Here are two TV ads from the 1970 campaign by Carl Sanders for Governor.

Yesterday, we taped Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Political Rewind early and it began with special guests former Governor Roy Barnes (D) and former Congressman Buddy Darden (D) discussing their experiences in Georgia politics with Carl Sanders. It was fun to hear first-hand stories of a time in Georgia politics that I’d only read about. The show will air today at 3 PM on WRAS 88.5 FM in Atlanta and statewide on the GPB radio network. If you enjoy Georgia history, you’ll enjoy the show.

Buddy Darden Roy Barnes

In the context of a movement to legalize the medicinal use of an oil derived from cannabis in Georgia, this clip of Jimmy Carter from 1977 is interesting.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

The first legislation of the 2015 Session of the Georgia General Assembly, House Bill 6, has been introduced by State Rep. Dar’shun Kendrick, to allow grades higher than 4.0 for AP, International Baccalaureate or dual credit courses. It would take a real overachiever to come up with something like that.

The Judicial Nominating Commission is accepting nominations for three vacancies on state courts:

Northern Judicial Circuit comprising Elbert, Franklin, Hart, Madison, and Oglethopre Counties

Coweta Judicial Circuit comprising Carroll, Coweta, Heard, Meriwether, and Troup Counties

Waycross Judicial Circuit comprising Bacon, Brantley, Charlton, Coffee, Pierce, and Ware Counties

Nominations for all three of the vacancies are due on or before December 29, 2014.

In Washington, Congressman Tom Graves (R-Upper Left-hand Corner) will serve as Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.

“I joined this committee because of the unique opportunity to fight for taxpayers and reform the federal government,” said Rep. Graves. “I want the Appropriations Committee to be known as a place where taxpayer dollars are saved, not spent. As the Legislative Branch Subcommittee chairman, I’ll have a prime opportunity to walk the conservative talk. It’s an honor to have Chairman Rogers and the House Majority entrust me with this major responsibility.”

Immigration

Yesterday’s big news mainly revolved around President Obama’s immigration speech. Here are reactions from some of Georgia’s members of Congress.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 20, 2014

New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights on November 20, 1789.

Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Warm Springs, Georgia for the 22d time on November 20, 1931.

Duane Allman was born in Nashville, Tennessee on November 20, 1946.

President John F. Kennedy lifted the naval blockade of Cuba on November 20, 1962, ending the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Newt Gingrich was reelected Speaker of the House on November 20, 1996

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Mark your calendars: Brian Kemp will schedule Georgia’s 2016 Presidential Preference Election for March First.

Last week, Kemp told the five other secretaries of state he’s working with in establishing a so-called “SEC” regional primary (named after the powerhouse college sports conference) that he intends to schedule Georgia’s presidential primary for March 1, 2016—an authority he was granted by the state Legislature in 2011. Tennessee has already set March 1 as its primary day, while the other four states still need to act through their respective legislatures to do the same. Primaries in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi are currently slated for later in March, while Arkansas’s is set for May.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 19, 2014

Lincolnatgettysburg

President Abraham Lincoln delivered an 87-word speech at the dedication of the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 19, 1863.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

On November 19, 1864, as Sherman marched toward Savannah, the Georgia delegation to the Confederate Congress in Richmond, Virginia, sent a message to the state,

“Let every man fly to arms! Remove your negroes, horses, cattle, and provisions from Sherman’s army, and burn what you cannot carry. Burn all bridges and block up the roads in his route. Assail the invader in front, flank, and rear, by night and by day. Let him have no rest.”

The first issue of National Review magazine was published on November 19, 1955.

Reagan Gorbachev 11191985

President Ronald Reagan met for the first time with Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev on November 19, 1985.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Morehouse College Republicans are in the spotlight in an article in The Source that is worth reading in its entirety.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 18, 2014

Abraham Lincoln traveled to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 18, 1863.

Carl Vinson was born on November 18, 1883 in Baldwin County, Georgia. At noon on that day, U.S. and Canadian railroads implemented four time zones for the first time.

Efficient rail transportation demanded a more uniform time-keeping system. Rather than turning to the federal governments of the United States and Canada to create a North American system of time zones, the powerful railroad companies took it upon themselves to create a new time code system. The companies agreed to divide the continent into four time zones; the dividing lines adopted were very close to the ones we still use today.

Most Americans and Canadians quickly embraced their new time zones, since railroads were often their lifeblood and main link with the rest of the world. However, it was not until 1918 that Congress officially adopted the railroad time zones and put them under the supervision of the Interstate Commerce Commission.

Mickey Mouse debuted in a black-and-white film called “Steamboat Willie” on November 18, 1928.

On November 18, 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt traveled from Washington, DC to Savannah, Georgia by train for Georgia’s Bicentennial and delivered a speech at Municipal Stadium.

Carl Vinson was honored on his 81st birthday in Milledgeville, Georgia on November 18, 1964; Vinson did not run for reelection in 1964 and retired after 50 years in office.

President Richard M. Nixon flew into Robins Air Force Base for Carl Vinson’s 90th birthday on November 18, 1973; on the trip he announced the next American nuclear supercarrier would be named USS Carl Vinson.

On November 18, 1989, Pennsylvania Governor Bob Casey signed the Abortion Control Act, the first abortion restrictions enacted after Roe v. Wade.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Flags Half Staff Barrow County 11172014

Flags will fly at half-staff on Georgia state buildings and facilities in honor of Governor Carl Sanders, who has died at age 89.

“Sandra and I are greatly saddened by the passing of Gov. Carl Sanders,” said Deal. “The bond we shared was more than the mutual possession of a public office; Gov. Sanders was a mentor and friend whose bright example of compassionate leadership was unsurpassed. During his tenure as governor, he transformed Georgia by building thousands of classrooms, improving our transportation system, increasing state income and bringing a competitive spirit to the state through the Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta Braves. But more than anything else, Gov. Sanders showed true leadership and character by supporting civil rights for all during a time when many were not. It is this legacy that I remember with a heavy heart today, and his lasting positive impact on our state will be felt by many future generations of Georgians. We will continue to pray for the Sanders family during this difficult time.”

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 22 at Second Ponce de Leon Baptist Church, 2715 Peachtree Road, NE. The family has asked that donations in memory of Gov. Sanders be made to either the Metropolitan YMCA or the University of Georgia Law School.

Yesterday, the Republican Caucus nominated Senator David Shafer (R-Duluth) for reelection as President Pro Tem, the highest-ranking member of the State Senate; the position will be formally elected by the entire Senate.

“I am grateful to my fellow Republicans in the Senate for their vote of renewed confidence today. I look forward to working with Senate Majority Leader Bill Cowsert and our new Caucus leadership team in making Georgia the best place to work, worship and raise children,” said Shafer.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 17, 2014

On November 17, 1732, the first English headed to colonize Georgia set off from Gravesend, England, down the Thames. Their supplies included ten tons of beer.

On November 17, 1777, Congress submitted the Articles of Confederation to the states for ratification.

Abraham Lincoln began the first draft of the Gettysburg Address on November 17, 1863.

Herman Talmadge was sworn in as Governor of Georgia on November 17, 1948, ending the “Three Governors” controversy. Click here for a review of the “Three Governors” episode by Ron Daniels.

Richard Nixon declared before a television audience, “I’m not a crook,” on November 17, 1973.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former Georgia Governor Carl Sanders has died.

Moving forward in Washington

Longtime Jack Kingston spokesman Chris Crawford will serve as Chief of Staff to newly-elected Congressman Buddy Carter, while David Perdue started hiring Washington staff last week. Congressman-elect Rick Allen is working on hiring a chief of staff.

Allen said he had three strong candidates to interview for chief of staff. Coming off a victory over Democratic U.S. Rep. John Barrow of Augusta that surprised many in Washington, Allen is the only Georgia newcomer taking over for a member of the opposite party. That means if there are any staff holdovers from the previous regime, they likely would be handling case work in the district — given Washington staffers’ party segregation.

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for November 14, 2014

General Sherman’s army prepared for the March to the Sea on November 14, 1864. The March to the Sea began on November 15, 1964.

The planned route for the 17th Corps was to march from White Hall to Stockbridge, McDonough, Jackson, Monticello, and Gordon and encountered Confederate regiments from Kentucky at the Battle of Stockbridge. To the west, one or two Kentucky regiments engaged the 15th Corps in another skirmish.  [E]arlier that morning, Maj. Gen. Henry Slocum had led the 20th Corps eastward out of Atlanta with instructions to follow the Georgia Railroad eastward to Decatur, Lithonia, Covington, and Madison, tearing up the railroad along the way.

With three of his four columns on the road, Gen. Sherman remained in Atlanta with the 14th corps to oversee the destruction of anything with possible military value to the Confederacy. The next day, they would then proceed east on the road to Lithonia, then in a southeastern direction to Milledgeville, where the 20th and 14th corps would reunite in seven days.

On November 16, 1864, Sherman left Atlanta in smoking ruins.

A 2010 Wired article argues that Sherman’s rampage through Georgia and the Carolinas changed modern warfare.

Vengeance aside, the real objective of Sherman’s march was to cut the Confederacy in two, cripple Southern industrial capacity, destroy the railroad system and compel an early Confederate surrender. It was also intended to break Southern morale — in Sherman’s words, to “make Georgia howl.”

Sherman was vilified for his barbarism, but the Union commander was a realist, not a romantic. He understood — as few of his contemporaries seemed to — that technology and industrialization were radically changing the nature of warfare.

It was no longer a question of independent armies meeting on remote battlefields to settle the issue. Civilians, who helped produce the means for waging modern war, would no longer be considered innocent noncombatants. Hitting the enemy where he ate and breaking him psychologically were just as important to victory as vanquishing his armies in the field.

Sherman grasped this and, though he wasn’t the first military proponent of total war, he was the first modern commander to deliberately strike at the enemy’s infrastructure. The scorched-earth tactics were effective. The fragile Southern economy collapsed, and a once-stout rebel army was irretrievably broken.

Meanwhile, the marshals of Europe watched Sherman’s progress with fascination. And they learned.

On November 14, 1944, the Constitutional Convention working on a revised document for Georgia reversed its position on home rule that had been adopted the previous day on the motion of Governor Ellis Arnall

Three astronauts with connections to Georgia – Eric Boe, Robert Kimbrough, and Sandra Magnus – were aboard the space shuttle Endeavor when it lifted off on November 14, 2008.

Earlier this week, a new monument commemorating the beginning of Sherman’s March to the Sea was placed on the grounds of The Carter Center in Atlanta. Walter Jones of Morris News brings the details.

The Georgia Historical Society is to unveil its latest monument today in a small ceremony on the grounds of the Carter Presidential Library, a quiet, tree-studded sanctuary that was the site of Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s departure from Atlanta along a nearby road. He had seized that city after a series of summer battles and then systematically destroyed its factories, banks and railroads to prevent their continued use in support of the Confederate army. His next destination would be Savannah, but Southerners didn’t know that at the time because he divided his troops and sent some toward Macon and others toward the munitions factories in Augusta to hide his true target.

Cities along the way that resisted were destroyed as Atlanta had been. Those that surrendered peacefully were spared.

The campaign would become the subject of songs, family tales, history books and military instruction. Modern commanders would copy it in the bombings of Dresden, Tokyo, Hiroshima and Hanoi for its demoralizing effect on civilians.

“What scholars have discovered is that the families along the route of the march, and those who feared they were along the route of the march, wrote to their husbands and said ‘come home,’” said Todd Groce, president of the Historical Society. The resulting flood of desertions crippled the crumbling rebel army.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Perhaps Cobb County Chairman Tim Lee is pursuing a divide an conquer strategy, publicly apologizing to one critic, while seeking the removal of a member of Cobb County’s Ethics Board. (more…)