Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 22, 2014

If it has somehow escaped your attention, today is election day in Georgia. If you have questions about your voter registration or where to vote, sign in to the Secretary of State’s My Voter Page for personalized information.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution also has a primer on Primary Runoff Elections, including this valuable information:

WHAT TO BRING

Georgia requires voters to show photo identification when they vote in person. Approved forms of identification include a Georgia driver’s license, even if it’s expired; a state-issued voter identification card; a valid U.S. passport; and a valid U.S. military photo ID.

BALLOTS

As a voter, you must stick with the party ballot you choose for the main primary (in other words, you can’t cast a Democratic ballot in the main primary and then vote in a Republican runoff). However, if you did not vote in the primary or if you originally picked a nonpartisan ballot, you may still vote in the runoff and pick the party ballot of your choice.

PROBLEMS

If you see or experience problems, first contact your local elections office. If local officials can’t help, the secretary of state’s office has an online complaint form via the “elections” tab at www.sos.ga.gov. The office’s voter fraud hot line is 877-725-9797.

General William Tecumseh Sherman gained the upper hand in the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 2014. Estimated casualties were 12,140 (3,641 Union, 8,499 Confederate). In some ways this makes today a fitting day to hold an election.

On July 22, 1975, the United States House of Representatives voted to restore U.S. Citizenship to General Robert E. Lee posthumously.

Though President Andrew Johnson issued a proclamation of amnesty and pardon to the Southern rebels in 1865, it required Lee to apply separately. On Oct. 2, 1865, the same day that Lee was inaugurated as president of Washington College in Lexington, Va., he signed the required amnesty oath and filed an application through Gen. Ulysses S. Grant.

Nonetheless, neither was Lee pardoned, nor was his citizenship restored. After receiving it, Secretary of State William Seward gave Lee’s application to a friend as a souvenir. Meanwhile, State Department officials, apparently with Seward’s approval, pigeonholed the oath.

In 1970, an archivist, examining State Department records at the National Archives, found Lee’s lost oath. That discovery helped set in motion a five-year congressional effort to restore citizenship to the general, who had died stateless in 1870.

President Gerald Ford signed the congressional resolution on July 24, 1975, correcting what he said was a 110-year oversight. The signing ceremony took place at Arlington House in Virginia, the former Lee family home. Several Lee descendants, including Robert E. Lee V, his great-great-grandson, attended.

Five Things to Watch for today

Today appears to be the day that Georgia journalists caught up to SEO best practices. Daniel Malloy and Greg Bluestein write in the AJC Political Insider blog, “Five things to Watch in the U.S. Senate Race.” Here’s an excerpt and the entire article is worth reading.

1. Overall turnout: Will the rain and the negativity of the race depress turnout that was already dismal in the May primary? We also encountered plenty of folks who still were not used to a July runoff, so voter confusion is at play too. If turnout is lower than 10 percent, the likely beneficiary is Kingston — who has the Republican clubs and county sheriffs and small-town mayors working their networks on his behalf.

2. Who’s making inroads in metro Atlanta? Former Secretary of State Karen Handel of Roswell and Rep. Phil Gingrey of Marietta endorsed Kingston and have been hitting the trail for him. If Handel, in particular, can swing her metro Atlanta base Kingston’s way it could prove decisive.

3. Can Kingston run up the score in the southeast again? Kingston won a whopping 75 percent of the vote in his congressional district in the primary and got strong turnout there. A runoff in the 1st  District should help him, but early voting there was down compared with the weeks before the primary.

Ray Henry and Russ Bynum of the Associated Press also wrote their own list of “5 Things To Know About Georgia’s Runoff Election”.

U.S. SENATE RACE GETS TOP BILLING

The retirement of U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss set off a scramble to win the Republican nomination for his seat. Senate seats are among the most coveted jobs in politics since senators enjoy the national prominence that comes with setting federal policy and face re-election less frequently than governors or members of the U.S. House of Representatives.

THREE GEORGIA CONGRESSIONAL SEATS ON RUNOFF BALLOTS

Three Georgia congressmen — Kingston, Paul Broun of Athens and Phil Gingrey of Marietta — all vacated their House seats to run for a promotion to the Senate. Republican primaries for each open seat were so crowded that the GOP nominations must be settled by the top two finishers in the Tuesday runoff.

OPEN RACE FOR GEORGIA’S STATE SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

In another statewide race, voters must pick Republican and Democratic nominees for state school superintendent.

Republican Michael Buck, chief academic officer for the state Department of Education, and Richard Woods, a longtime educator in Irwin County, are running in the Republican runoff, while state Rep. Alisha Thomas Morgan and former Decatur School Board Chairwoman Valarie Wilson are competing in the Democratic contest.

Going to vote shortly

I had dinner unexpectedly with a fellow Republican political strategist and his wife the other night when I showed up at Alfredo’s alone and took a seat next to them at the bar. As we talked about today’s election, it emerged that each of us has our own rituals. Among mine is that election day is for voting first, so after I feed and walk the dogs, I’ll walk over to the local high school and cast my ballot. In a day filled with anxiety, having a ritual to start with helps, and it also gives me a gauge of what turnout looks like – this is only one data point, but all day today, political operatives will be looking for tea leaves to read. Here’s how I’ll fill out my ballot.

United States Senate – Jack Kingston – with slim policy differences between the two candidates, it comes down to picking a reason to choose one over the other, and I’m voting for Jack Kingston because I know him to be focused on serving the people of Georgia as evidenced by the overwhelming vote of confidence he received from voters in his own Congressional district. When a Congressman gets the support of nearly 75% of voters in his own district in his campaign for the senior chamber, that tells me his constituents believe they have been well-served.

We’ve also seen Kingston take several actions that garnered him criticism in his Senate campaign because he thought they were the right choices to make, rather than the politically-expedient ones.

Kingston probably could have moved the Port of Savannah project along faster if he had chosen to find a way around the GOP policy against earmarks, but he abided by that policy. His vote in favor of the Farm Bill was welcomed across South Georgia, but caused him some heartburn with ideologically-driven voters in Metro Atlanta and set him apart in the crowded Primary field.

Finally, I know Jack Kingston to be a good man and his family is perhaps the greatest testament to that. David Perdue is probably a fine individual, I just didn’t get the chance to learn whether that’s true during the course of this campaign.

Perdue has grown into a very competent politician and will be a strong contender if he chooses to run for office again.

And then, there’s this:

“Even though [Jack Kingston]‘s been a member of Congress for 20-plus years, [he] feels more accessible,” said GOP political consultant Todd Rehm. “If you’ve met a guy and he returned your phone call, or his staff helped with an issue, it’s hard to think of that person as one of those evil insiders. David Perdue might be the most warm and friendly personality … but I wouldn’t know, because he’s never acknowledged me.”

 

State School Superintendent – Richard Woods I’m casting my ballot for Richard Woods for three reasons.

First, in no particular order, is that he’s a social conservative, evidenced by his receiving the endorsement of Georgia Right to Life. If all other things were equal, that endorsement would prove dispositive.

Second, his opponent Mike Buck, aided and abetted the campaign of John Barge, whose Chief of Staff Buck serves as , in Barge’s challenge to Governor Nathan Deal on a platform indistinguishable from that of liberal Democrat Jason Carter.

Third, we’ve had four years of John Barge and don’t need four more years of the status quo.

 

DeKalb Sheriff – I don’t have a preference in this race, but I will by the time I cast my ballot. It’s probably the most important election in my area, but neither candidate has given me a reason to vote for him today. Vernon Jones has his well-known issues, but can argue that he was a competent administrator as CEO, and as remarkable as it may sound, the fact that he’s never actually been indicted sets him apart from his successor and far too many politicians in DeKalb. Jeff Mann, currently the incumbent after Tom Brown resigned to run for Congress, has not contacted me about his campaign in any form during the runoff.

How not to win at social media

Yesterday, the Georgia Republican Party launched a Twitter campaign that didn’t just fall flat, it cratered.

Join us on Twitter as we stand up for Governor Deal! Use the hashtag #WeKnowNathan and let’s put an end to the baseless attacks from the radical left.

Instead it turned into a new vector for baseless attacks from the radical left. In a nasty competitive environment like Twitter, how do you prevent this from happening? I don’t know either, but I’m going to see what I can learn about it.

Jack Kingston’s Insider Advantage – NationalJournal.com

“Even though he’s been a member of Congress for 20-plus years, [he] feels more accessible,” said GOP political consultant Todd Rehm. “If you’ve met a guy and he returned your phone call, or his staff helped with an issue, it’s hard to think of that person as one of those evil insiders. David Perdue might be the most warm and friendly personality … but I wouldn’t know, because he’s never acknowledged me.”

via Jack Kingston’s Insider Advantage – NationalJournal.com.

Political silence not always golden | SaportaReport

Much has been about the power of social media in political campaigns. President Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns have been praised for their superior use of social media to attract voters.

GOP campaign consultant Todd Rehm said that while social media can be part of an effective campaign strategy, especially in targeting more voters to go vote in low-turnout elections, it is foolish to make it the centerpiece of that effort.

“In the 2010 election cycle, a lot of people thought there was something magical about Facebook,” said Rehm. “It can be useful for some things to the extent that if you have enthusiastic volunteers and supporters who are saying positive things in positive ways, it can help help reinforce the motivation of your base of voters and attract additional support.”

“However,” Rehm added, “when I hear a candidate say we don’t to have to raised money (for direct mail or television advertising), we’re going to use Facebook and e-mails and Twitter to win this thing, that meeting is over, because they aren’t going to win that way.”

via Political silence not always golden | SaportaReport.

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for July 22, 2014

Athene

Athene is a female 2-3 month old Beagle/Terrier mix puppy who is friendly and on the urgent list at Barrow County Animal Shelter.

Canyon

Canyon is a male Hound Dog mix, about 2-3 years old, friendly and on tomorrow’s euthanasia list at Barrow County Animal Shelter.

Chino

Chino is a Male Pit Mix, still a puppy at 9-12 months of age and very friendly, but a little bit shy. He weighs 42 pounds. He zooms around and acts like a clown when you walk with him but as soon as you sit down, he settles into your lap and settles down for cuddles. Chino is young enough and balanced enough to fit into almost any situation. Chino is on the euthanasia list for tomorrow morning at Barrow County Animal Shelter.

Any dogs on the Euthanasia list at Barrow County Animal Shelter must be spoken for today, with paperwork filed by 4 PM.

Hello, I’m [Insert Label Here]

Labels in politics scare me. That’s the conclusion I reached this weekend as my Facebook News Feed became alternating posts about political candidates. I get it. Labels are catchy. They sum up a campaign in three or less words. “Career Politician” sounds like a bad thing. “Outsiders” sound like a good solution to a broken government.

But the labels being used are dishonest: politically and intellectually. Take my experience this weekend: I was bombarded by Facebook posts telling me abut friends who supported a Senate candidate who “had a real job,” who is an “Outsider,” not a “career politician,” and a host of other labels. I knew who they were supporting because of the pictures associated with the posting.

There was just one problem. Michelle Nunn is not a career politician, had a real job, and would be an outsider in Washington. No one I asked wanted to vote for Nunn, even though she met the labels. No one would indicate they were inclined to vote for Nunn, should their candidate lose.

It gets worse. Know of anymore career politicians running this fall? Governor Deal has more than twenty-two years. Will the outsider’s supporters vote for the “outsider” Jason Carter? I doubt it.

Let’s be honest. Political labels sound good when they can be used to bolster a candidate we support. But what if the only criteria voters armed themselves with were labels? I think you would see results ideologically inconsistent with the voters beliefs. Drill down further, my generation receives information in 144 characters or less. Do we really want voters operating solely off “labels?”

The Marietta Daily Journal – Election official Interest pushes more Republicans to polls during early voting

Friday was the final day of early voting, and 9,606 Cobb residents voted in person during the advance voting period that started June 30, according to Janine Eveler, the director of the county’s election board. That total does not include mail and overseas ballots.

Eveler said Friday that Republicans generally turned out in larger numbers to vote ahead of time than they did before the May 20 primary.

She was not able to provide a grand total of Republican to Democrat voters because the state reports don’t come out until Monday, but she compared data from two dates to give an example: Thursday was the next to last day to vote ahead of the runoff election and saw 1,183 Republicans cast ballots in the county. The final day to cast a ballot before the primary was May 15, which garnered 1,127 ballots.

In comparing those two days, 56 more Republican voters, or about 5 percent more, turned out to vote in the runoff election.

Typically “the numbers go down in a runoff, so the relatively higher Republican numbers showed a continued interest in the races on that ballot,” Eveler said.

Democrats did not follow suit those same two days: 289 voted May 15, while 136 came to an early polling station Thursday, a difference of 153, or 53 percent fewer voters.

via The Marietta Daily Journal – Election official Interest pushes more Republicans to polls during early voting.

Voters to decide Georgia primary runoffs Tuesday | savannahnow.com

Some 393 poll workers will be on hand as 89 polls across the county are scheduled to be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

There will be 157 fewer poll workers than worked the May 20 primaries, but Chatham County Elections Supervisor Russell Bridges told elections board members last week he expects just 10-15 percent voter turnout.

“It may be higher,” Bridges said.

Activity has been busier than what is typical for a normal summer runoff, he said. But at 23 percent, he said, May’s primary turnout was low, though not exceptionally low.

The primary, which is typically held in July, was moved up to May this year.

By Friday morning, just 4,160 (not including 1,137 absentee ballots mailed), or 3.2 percent, of Chatham County’s 129,463 registered voters participated in early voting, which

ended Friday. Poll workers at the Savannah Civic Center, one of four early voting sites, estimated that only 60 people had voted there last week.

via Voters to decide Georgia primary runoffs Tuesday | savannahnow.com.

Congressional candidates report final fundraising push | savannahnow.com

The primary runoffs are Tuesday, and the numbers are in for the last round of fundraising in the 1st Congressional District races.

Last Tuesday was the deadline for federal candidates to file campaign disclosure reports.

State Sen. Buddy Carter, who faces Bob Johnson in the Republican runoff, raised $369,168, including a $50,000 personal loan, during the final three months of the campaign. He spent $380,214, which left him with $230,698 in cash on hand.

By comparison, Johnson’s campaign between May 1 and July 2 raised a total of $287,104 in contributions, including a $4,000 personal loan, and spent $442,641, leaving him with $49,656.

Carter and Johnson loaned themselves $300,000 and $224,000, respectively, during the course of the campaign, which equates to one-quarter of their contributions. They relied heavily on their professional colleagues for much of the rest.

via Congressional candidates report final fundraising push | savannahnow.com.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 21, 2014

On July 20, 1864, the Battle of Peachtree Creek took place in Atlanta. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has a special online section on the Battle of Atlanta.

On July 21, 1868, the Georgia General Assembly ratified the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution as a condition for readmission.

Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton gave the speech nominating Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis for President on July 20, 1988 at the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. Dukakis accepted the nomination the next day.

The 1996 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony was held on July 19, 1996 and competition started the next day.

The Georgia State Quarter was released on July 19, 1999.

Campaigns and Elections

Three major Congressional runoff elections take place tomorrow in Georgia.

In Coastal Georgia’s First District, State Senator Buddy Carter and Dr. Bob Johnson meet in a runoff that has been dominated by high-dollar spending.

State Sen. Buddy Carter, who faces Bob Johnson in the Republican runoff, raised $369,168, including a $50,000 personal loan, during the final three months of the campaign. He spent $380,214, which left him with $230,698 in cash on hand.

By comparison, Johnson’s campaign between May 1 and July 2 raised a total of $287,104 in contributions, including a $4,000 personal loan, and spent $442,641, leaving him with $49,656.

While the Democratic Primary to be the sacrificial lamb nominee facing the winner of the Carter-Johnson runoff has been decidedly less expensive.

Amy Tavio raised $4,839 during the final months of the campaign and spent $5,290, leaving her with $1,866. She loaned herself $2,084 during the campaign.

Her Democratic runoff opponent, Brian Reese, raised $3,875 and reports show he didn’t spend any money in the closing months. He loaned himself $3,000 during the race.

Chatham County is expecting turnout in the 15-17 percent range.

Some 393 poll workers will be on hand as 89 polls across the county are scheduled to be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

There will be 157 fewer poll workers than worked the May 20 primaries, but Chatham County Elections Supervisor Russell Bridges told elections board members last week he expects just 10-15 percent voter turnout.

“It may be higher,” Bridges said.

Activity has been busier than what is typical for a normal summer runoff, he said. But at 23 percent, he said, May’s primary turnout was low, though not exceptionally low.

By Friday morning, just 4,160 (not including 1,137 absentee ballots mailed), or 3.2 percent, of Chatham County’s 129,463 registered voters participated in early voting, which ended Friday. Poll workers at the Savannah Civic Center, one of four early voting sites, estimated that only 60 people had voted there last week.

In the Tenth Congressional District, Congressman Paul Broun has endorsed Jody Hice for his successor.

Broun had stayed out of the GOP primary in the 10th District until now, saying he did not want to anoint a successor. But in a Monday radio interview in Georgia, Broun said recent events pushed him to support Hice over businessman Mike Collins in the July 22 runoff.

“Just recently Mike Collins has rejected and repudiated my simple four-way test. … Jody Hice has pledged that he is going to use that same four-way test as he evaluates legislation and Mike Collins just recently said that he rejects that test,” Broun said on Georgia’s Morning News with Zoller & Bryant.

Hice came in first by a few hundred votes in the May 20 GOP primary in this district — a strong Republican seat located in the Atlanta exurbs. In Georgia, if no candidate gets 50 percent of the primary vote, the race proceeds to a runoff.

Hice has made controversial remarks in the past, including that Islam should not be protected by the First Amendment, and that women should run for office only with their husband’s permission.

Collins is the son of former Rep. Mac Collins, R-Ga., and owns a successful trucking company. He received the endorsements of former Georgia Senate candidate Karen Handel, former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa., and former Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga.

Here’s one fact that may indicate how that race is going. Jody Hice carried nearly 57.1% of Walton County’s votes in the Primary on May 20th, while Mike Collins took 21.7% in Walton.

During the May 20th Primary, 1482 Walton County voters cast ballots in the Tenth District Republican Primary; as of the latest file from the Secretary of State’s office, 1,762 ballots have been cast in early voting leading up to tomorrow’s Tenth District Republican Primary Runoff in Walton County, an increase of nearly 20%.

Given that Walton is the most populous county in the District, and Hice carried well over twice as many votes as Collins in the Primary early voting, this may represent a boost for Hice. Or it may be that people who would otherwise have voted tomorrow simply chose to vote early.

Cobb County Elections director Janine Eveler also says that turnout is higher in Cobb County early voting, where runoffs are being held for 11th District Congress between Bob Barr and Barry Loudermilk; a County Commission Runoff between Bill Byrne and Bob Weatherford, and a school board runoff between Tim Stultz and Susan Thayer.

Eveler said Friday that Republicans generally turned out in larger numbers to vote ahead of time than they did before the May 20 primary.
She was not able to provide a grand total of Republican to Democrat voters because the state reports don’t come out until Monday, but she compared data from two dates to give an example: Thursday was the next to last day to vote ahead of the runoff election and saw 1,183 Republicans cast ballots in the county. The final day to cast a ballot before the primary was May 15, which garnered 1,127 ballots.
In comparing those two days, 56 more Republican voters, or about 5 percent more, turned out to vote in the runoff election.
Typically “the numbers go down in a runoff, so the relatively higher Republican numbers showed a continued interest in the races on that ballot,” Eveler said.
Democrats did not follow suit those same two days: 289 voted May 15, while 136 came to an early polling station Thursday, a difference of 153, or 53 percent fewer voters.

The Marietta Daily Journal has an excellent piece covering the final days of the runoff in their local races.

Barr and Loudermilk have ramped up the intensity of their personal and political punches since weeding out four other candidates in the May primary. Because no Democrat filed to run in the district, the winner of the runoff is expected to replace Gingrey in Congress.

“It’s been really heating up the last couple of weeks,” Swint said of the race.

Loudermilk said although his own campaign has tried to maintain its focus on the issues, “the tone has definitely changed” for his opponent since the runoff began.
Last month’s dust-up over allegations that Loudermilk had embellished his military service record put both campaigns on defense.
While Loudermilk decried what he saw as an “orchestrated attack on my military record,” Barr said he was not behind the accusations, which were publicized by a group of local veterans. He downplayed the fact his campaign manager, Jeff Breedlove, attended news conferences at which Loudermilk’s record was questioned.
“I think it was and is bothersome to the veterans,” Barr said of the controversy. He said most of the veterans he talks to are “very careful” not to misrepresent their military service.
“I think they were concerned and remain very concerned about that kind of embellishment.”

Concerns about runoff turnout have dominated the Senate race as well. The AJC brings us this story:

The TV ads get the attention, but as David Perdue and Jack Kingston circle the state ahead of Tuesday’s U.S. Senate Republican runoff, both are emphasizing the politics of the personal.

Turnout is expected to be 10 percent or lower, giving each handshake and social media post greater import. And while both men have worked every corner of the state, they are spending the most time in metro Atlanta and parts north to mine an area thick with Republican voters.

“If you study runoffs in Georgia, there’s no pattern to who wins,” said Perdue, former CEO of Dollar General, at a recent campaign stop in northwest Georgia. “If you finish first or second, it doesn’t matter. But the one constant is motivated people win. When you call people and tell them who you’re voting for, it matters to them.”

Kingston tells crowds that posting a photo of themselves with the 11-term Savannah congressman on Facebook is far more effective than his TV ads.

“What we’re trying to do as much as possible is a lot of email, a lot of Facebook and getting the party enthusiasts out telling their friends — word of mouth — with the hope that overcomes some of the negative ads,” Kingston said.

The TV ads get the attention, but as David Perdue and Jack Kingston circle the state ahead of Tuesday’s U.S. Senate Republican runoff, both are emphasizing the politics of the personal.

Turnout is expected to be 10 percent or lower, giving each handshake and social media post greater import. And while both men have worked every corner of the state, they are spending the most time in metro Atlanta and parts north to mine an area thick with Republican voters.

“If you study runoffs in Georgia, there’s no pattern to who wins,” said Perdue, former CEO of Dollar General, at a recent campaign stop in northwest Georgia. “If you finish first or second, it doesn’t matter. But the one constant is motivated people win. When you call people and tell them who you’re voting for, it matters to them.”

Kingston tells crowds that posting a photo of themselves with the 11-term Savannah congressman on Facebook is far more effective than his TV ads.

“What we’re trying to do as much as possible is a lot of email, a lot of Facebook and getting the party enthusiasts out telling their friends — word of mouth — with the hope that overcomes some of the negative ads,” Kingston said.

John Konop, of Canton, said he was still trying to make up his mind — and coming away dispirited.

“I hear talking points on both sides and I don’t hear anything of substance from either one,” he said. “I’m a regular voter but it is frustrating because I’m having a hard time distinguishing what they’re really going to do.”

Kingston and Perdue are running to replace Republican U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss, who is retiring. Tuesday’s winner faces Democratic nonprofit executive Michelle Nunn of Atlanta in what is expected to be a nationally watched race.

Perdue won the most votes in the May 20 primary, claiming 30 percent of the vote in the seven-candidate race. He was particularly popular in north Georgia, winning most of the mountain counties and even besting primary opponents U.S. Reps. Paul Broun of Athens and Phil Gingrey of Marietta in their own congressional districts. Perdue also was popular near his boyhood home of Warner Robins.

Kingston, meanwhile, captured enormous margins in areas he has represented in Congress. He won his coastal First Congressional District with 74.8 percent of the vote. Perdue, who now lives in the district in Sea Island, was second there with 10.5 percent. Kingston also won two neighboring South Georgia districts, parts of which he represented before redistricting.

“It wasn’t a surprise that Jack did well in south Georgia – the surprise was the margin,” said GOP strategist Chip Lake, who is not aligned with either runoff candidate. “David Perdue probably has an advantage in the northern part of the state, but he’s not going to have the margins Jack will in the south. And that makes for a competitive, close race that could be decided within a point or two.”

n the primary Kingston’s south Georgia margins were enough to overcome former Secretary of State Karen Handel’s metro Atlanta strength. Handel, of Roswell, has endorsed Kingston in the runoff and has been an energetic backer, urging her donors to give to Kingston, hitting the campaign trail for him and even offering a homemade concoction to soothe Kingston’s weary throat when his voice failed him.

“I want to be helpful in consolidating some of the votes that I won – that can hopefully be the difference in the race,” she said. “The southern strategy is going to be important, but Jack’s not forgetting about metro Atlanta.”

In fact, this weekend, Kingston’s volunteers scattered across the Metro Atlanta, covering every event they could find, and smothering potential voters with personal attention.

Here’s the Kingston campaign’s end-game, all out there on Facebook for everyone to see.

1. Fly-around tour of Georgia, with prominent stops in Savannah, Brunswick, Albany, Macon, Augusta, and Atlanta. Likely others.

2. Volunteer phoning in large numbers.

3. Campaign stops and rallies in Metro Atlanta.