Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 14, 2017

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Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for July 14, 2017

On June 16, 1736, General James Oglethorpe arrived in England with Tomochichi, the Yamacraw Indian chief, Tomochichi’s wife and several other members of the tribe on a trip to meet the Georgia Trustees and King George II.

Happy Birthday to the French, who today celebrate the 225th anniversary of Bastille Day, 14 July 1798, when citizens stormed the Bastille, a prison in Paris.

On July 14, 1798, the Alien and Sedition Act became federal law.

The first three acts took aim at the rights of immigrants. The period of residency required before immigrants could apply for citizenship was extended from five to 14 years, and the president gained the power to detain and deport those he deemed enemies. President Adams never took advantage of his newfound ability to deny rights to immigrants. However, the fourth act, the Sedition Act, was put into practice and became a black mark on the nation’s reputation. In direct violation of the Constitution’s guarantee of freedom of speech, the Sedition Act permitted the prosecution of individuals who voiced or printed what the government deemed to be malicious remarks about the president or government of the United States. Fourteen Republicans, mainly journalists, were prosecuted, and some imprisoned, under the act.

Creek Indians signed the Treaty of Fort Wilkinson on June 16, 1802, ceding two parcels of land in Georgia to the United States.

On June 16, 1858, Abraham Lincoln addressed the Illiniois Republican Convention as a candidate for U.S. Senate and warned that “a house divided against itself cannot stand.”

On July 14, 1864, General Sherman issued Special Field Order 35, outlining the plan for the Battle of Atlanta.

On July 15, 1864, Sherman’s army began crossing the Chattahoochee River and would take the better part of three days to complete the crossing. Georgia Public Broadcasting has a series on Sherman’s Georgia campaign, and you can watch this week’s episode here.

Major General George Stoneman’s cavalry had come to the area south of Atlanta. On July 15, 1864, Stoneman wrote from camp near Villa Rica, Georgia.

As I indicated to you in my last note, we completed the bridge (Moore’s), and were ready to cross at daybreak yesterday morning, but before we essayed it a report came from Major Buck, in command of a battalion seven miles above, that the enemy had been crossing above him on a boat or a bridge, and that his pickets had been cut off.

Colonel Biddle, who was left with his brigade at Campbellton, reports the enemy quite strong at that point, with two guns of long range in each of the two redoubts on the opposite bluff, which are opened upon him whenever any of his men show themselves.

I was very anxious to strike the railroad from personal as well as other considerations, but I became convinced that to attempt it would incur risks inadequate to the results, and unless we could hold the bridge, as well as penetrate into the country, the risk of capture or dispersion, with loss of animals (as I could hear of no ford), was almost certain.

The Atlanta Constitution was first published on June 16, 1868.

On July 15, 1870, Georgia was readmitted to the United States, with the signature by President Ulysses Grant of the “Georgia Bill” by the U.S. Congress.

On July 15, 1948, President Harry Truman was nominated at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago to run for a full term as President of the United States.

Bob Dylan recorded “Like a Rolling Stone” on June 16, 1965.

The Monterey Pop Festival opened at the Monterey Fairgrounds on June 16, 1967, often considered one of the opening events of the “Summer of Love.” Among the artists playing the Festival were the Jefferson Airplane, The Who, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, and Macon-born Otis Redding.

Six Flags Over Georgia opened on June 16, 1967.

On July 14, 1976, former Georgia Governor Jimmy Carter won the Democratic nomination for President at the Democratic National Convention.

Atlanta Braves player Otis Nixon tied the modern record for steals in one game with six stolen bases agains the Montreal Expos on June 16, 1991.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Former President Jimmy Carter was hospitalized in Winnipeg, in Manitoba, Canada, after becoming dehydrated at a Habitat for Humanity worksite.

President Donald Trump nominated three Georgians to federal district court judgeships.

Michael Brown of Alston & Bird and Georgia Court of Appeals Judge William “Billy”Ray II are Trump’s picks to fill openings on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Georgia Court of Appeals Judge Tripp Self is Trump’s choice for the Middle District of Georgia.

Georgia’s U.S. senators cheered the choices in a news release following the White House announcement Thursday.

“The president has nominated three outstanding Georgians, and I look forward to working with them as they go through the confirmation process in the Senate,” Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Georgia, said in the joint release.

“President Trump nominated an impressive and qualified group of individuals to fill the vacant federal judgeships in the Middle and Northern Districts of Georgia,” said Sen. David Perdue, R-Georgia. “I look forward to meeting with Mike Brown, William Ray and Tripp Self as they go through the Senate confirmation process.”

From the Gwinnett Daily Post:

“Judge Billy Ray currently serves as the presiding judge on the Georgia Court of Appeals,” The White House said in its announcement about the nominations. “Prior to his appointment to the Court of Appeals, Judge Ray served for 10 years as a Superior Court judge on the Gwinnett Judicial Circuit.”

Ray has a long career of public service in Georgia. He joined the law firm of Andersen, Davidson and Tate P.C. (now Andersen, Tate and Carr P.C.) in 1990 and became a partner in 1995. He was then elected to represent state Senate District 48 in 1996, serving on the Judiciary, Special Judiciary, Rules, Appropriations, Natural Resources and Transportation Committees, participating on the Governor’s Education Reform Commission from 1999- 2000, and working to get tougher DUI laws passed.

Ray was then appointed to a Gwinnett County Superior Court judgeship in 2002 by then-Gov. Roy Barnes. Gov. Nathan Deal appointed him to the Court of Appeals in 2012.

Ray also helped found the Gwinnett County Drug Treatment Court in 1995, according to his biography on the Court of Appeals website.

Perdue PAC, associated with former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue, gave $55,000 to the Georgia Republican Party.

Perdue PAC, a federal fund started a decade ago with money left over from his successful 2006 re-election campaign, donated $55,000 left in the account June 29 to the Georgia Republican Party, according to recently filed campaign disclosures.

The contribution came a few weeks after GOP convention delegates elected Perdue’s former chief of staff, John Watson, to run the party. Watson also served as chairman of Perdue PAC.

Separate GOP funds run by House and Senate leaders and a Republican lobbyist have nearly $2 million banked.

Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle discussed the idea of a minimum wage for law enforcement officers.

“We are looking for mandatory minimums for our local law enforcement officers. We raised our state troopers [pay]. We’ve got to find a way for local law enforcement to do the same,” Cagle said.

The minimum wage would only affect post-certified officers, Cagle said.

Since troopers got a 20-percent pay hike this year, staffing is a concern for local police and sheriff’s department, according to Chattooga County Sheriff Mark Schrader.

“I’ve got several deputies that are definitely checking into working for the State Patrol,” Sheriff Schrader said. “They could make $15,000 more a year just on the starting salary.”

“We are going to find some ways that are going to help some of our poorer counties that do not have the tax base to compensate officers the way they need to be. We may have to look at doing something like we do with education equalization where the state finds ways to help offset some of the costs that is needed,” Cagle said.

Two Bartow County firefighters were hospitalized after working a fire at Plant Bowen.

Hall County Commissioners voted to move forward in the first phase of building a gun range to serve the Hall County Sheriff’s Office and the FBI.

Smyrna Mayor Max Bacon delivered the State of the City address.

The Fulton County Board of Elections voted to fine-tune some voting precincts.

Fulton County election board members on Thursday unanimously approved closing, consolidating or moving several polling locations in precincts that are mostly African-American, a decision officials said was meant to streamline how voters cast their ballots on Election Day.
They also said many of the locations had seen Election Day usage decline as the popularity of early voting has surged.

Voting advocates, however, warned that the changes could disenfranchise voters. In a letter to the board, the national Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law along with several Georgia groups said they believed officials have not fully considered “the significant burden and negative, disparate impact the closure of these polling locations will have on low income and minority voters,” including those who typically walk or take public transportation in order to cast their ballots.

Some Georgians are removing their names from voter lists in fear of a federal election integrity investigation.

Under Georgia law, some voter information is public, such as a voter’s home address, race and gender. Georgia voters do not declare party affiliation, but whether someone voted in a Democratic or Republican primary is publicly available information.

Kemp’s office has said it plans to provide only public voter data, satisfying some of the commission’s request, and only after the commission pays $250 just like everyone else.

Savannah’s Mayor and Board of Aldermen will hold public hearings to discuss the property tax millage rate.

The mayor and aldermen of the city of Savannah have tentatively adopted a millage rate which will require an increase in property taxes by 3.810 percent over the rollback millage rate. The 3.810 percent increase over the rollback millage rate will maintain the current 12.48 mills, which was tentatively adopted on December 22, 2016.

The proposed millage rate of 12.48 mills is the lowest millage rate in the City of Savannah since 1987, and represents a 29 percent reduction over the past two decades.

When the total digest of taxable property is prepared, Georgia law requires that a rollback millage rate must be computed that will produce the same total revenue on the current year’s digest that last year’s millage rate would have produced had no reassessments occurred. The proposed millage rate of 12.48 mills is an increase of .458 mills over the rollback millage rate of 12.022 mills. The proposed tax increase for a home with a fair market value of $125,000 is approximately $22.90 and the proposed tax increase for a non-homestead property with a fair market value of $550,000 is approximately $100.76

Healthcare

Georgia healthcare leaders are looking at how the newest U.S. Senate health care bill will effect the state.

For rural hospitals, the latest revision of the effort to repeal and replace Obamacare is just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, an advocate said; one for patient care called it destabilizing. A signal issue for them remained the fundamental scaling back of Medicaid that the Senate Republicans would do.

But for taxpayers and insurance customers, it’s an even better step toward consumer choice and market efficiency, said Kelly McCutchen of the libertarian-leaning Georgia Public Policy Foundation.

Georgia U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, with backing from his colleague David Perdue, scored a bargaining win with a funding formula for indigent care hospitals that is now included in the newest bill. The formula will now be more friendly to states such as Georgia that didn’t expand Medicaid. And the amendment in the bill to ease requirements on what plans insurance companies can sell is a longtime conservative goal.

Of high concern for Isakson, Perdue and Gov. Nathan Deal in recent months has been ensuring that Georgia, which did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, was not at a significant disadvantage in the Senate bill compared with the 31 states that did.

Isakson aimed to do that in part by securing more money for charity hospitals such as Grady Memorial Hospital, which take on a greater share of uninsured patients. After the first Senate GOP bill screeched to a halt, Isakson asked McConnell to change the way Medicaid funds Grady and other safety-net hospitals through its Disproportionate Share Hospitals program.

Isakson said he felt like some of his concerns were addressed in the new Senate bill.

“I worked hard to see that the distribution formula was more equitable for” those hospitals, Isakson told reporters Thursday. The new bill “is going to make the formula of reimbursement to disproportionate share hospitals more equitable than it would have been under the Affordable Care Act. And I think hospitals like Grady and others will feel like it’s a much fairer treatment.”

[S]tate Sen. Renee Unterman, a Republican from Buford who has taken up the issue as chairwoman of the state Senate’s health committee, was pleased.

She touted the inclusion of $45 billion over 10 years for opioid addiction treatment, also mentioning the provisions that protected HSAs.

“We are moving the dial,” she said. “I think it’s an improvement.”

Grady Memorial Hospital became the second nationally-certified Level I trauma center in Georgia.

“Verified trauma centers must meet the high standards set by the ACS for trauma care capabilities and institutional performance. Our success at achieving verification validates what we have known for some time – Grady’s trauma care is second to none,” said Dr. Peter Rhee, Chief of Acute Care Surgery and Medical Director for Grady’s Marcus Trauma Center.  “As a nationally-recognized ACS Level I trauma center, our patients and families know we provide the highest levels of care.”

“It was not enough for us to be designated a Level I Trauma Center. Seeking verification from a national body and attaining it adds a standard of excellence for trauma care so there is no question about it, we are equipped and ready for any kind of trauma that enters our doors,” said Liz Atkins, Trauma Program Director.

Grady Memorial also is working to raise $165 to expand its Downtown Atlanta campus and AIDS Treatment Center.

Navicent Health Hospital received a national award for stroke care.

The Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon has a new Commander, Col. David E. Ristedt.

2018 Elections

The Republican Governors Association posted record fundraising numbers for the first half of 2017.

The Republican Governors Association announced Tuesday it hauled in a record-high $36 million in the first six months of the year.

The GOP group’s previous record was $23.5 million in the first half of 2013. An RGA spokesman said the new record puts conservatives in a position to win re-election bids and defeat Democratic governors with a new era of Republican leaders.

“The RGA’s record fundraising is the direct result of the hard work and meaningful reform accomplished by every Republican governor,” RGA Chairman Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin said in a statement.

“Republican governors are America’s doers – they are expanding opportunity, driving job creation, reining in wasteful spending and making government more efficient. With this fundraising success, the RGA is in prime position to re-elect our incumbents and elect even more Republican governors this cycle.”

The Republican Governors Association is headed by Executive Director Paul Bennecke, a Georgian.

Senator Michael Williams held a press conference yesterday. Let me know how you think it went.

From the AJC Political team:

Republican Michael Williams vowed his press conference at the Georgia statehouse would release a trove of new and “corroborating” details about the front-runner in the race for governor. Instead, he used the event to blast Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle with no proof to back his claims up.

With a handful of reporters and a few supporters watching on, the state senator accused Cagle of thwarting his proposal to boost pay for police. And he again asserted that Cagle and his allies offered him a plum position to drop his campaign.

Pressed after his roughly 7-minute speech about delivering the promised evidence, Williams came up empty.

At one point, he said the fact that he could only convince two other GOP senators to co-sponsor his police-pay legislation was proof of Cagle’s interference, saying he based that on “comments they made to me.” He would say nothing else.

When asked for verifiable details about his claim that he was offered a powerful committee chairmanship to back out of the governor’s race, he repeatedly refused comment.

After the event, as Williams quickly disappeared and head-shaking staffers returned to their offices, state Sen. Renee Unterman stayed behind. In unsparing terms, she accused Williams of running a “fraudulent” campaign and of playing bait-and-switch with overhyped promises.

“He wants to lead the voters on and the media on,” said Unterman, who backs Cagle. “It’s fluff. And it’s not very good fluff.”

And from 11Alive’s Doug Richards:

Georgia’s 2018 race for governor got a curious public start today when a state senator held an event in which he promised to expose what he called “the reprehensible behavior” of another candidate. It ended up raising at least as many questions as it answered.

The race to become the Republican nominee to replace Governor Nathan Deal includes four candidates. Thursday’s event involved the one who has raised the least amount of money trying to take down the one who has raised the most.

Williams went on to blame Cagle for tanking two bills Williams sponsored – and to renew an old charge that an unnamed Cagle operative tried to bribe him to get out of the governor’s race.

Williams was asked four times to name the operative. Williams declined.

“He knows he is last probably in a field of four,” said state Sen. Renee Unterman (R-Buford), a Cagle backer who watched Williams’ performance.

“And then you don’t bring out the facts. They don’t appear! And I think it’s because it’s not true,” Unterman said.

Williams has raised a bare fraction of the campaign money Casey Cagle has. And it was Williams who called on Cagle to withdraw from the race.

Former Georgia politico Rob Simms, who was General Consultant for Karen Handel’s congressional campaign, and his business partner Mike Shields, penned “Seven Winning Lessons for Republicans for 2018.”

Lesson #1: Republicans need every part of the Republican coalition to win elections — including, and sometimes especially, those voters who supported President Trump in 2016. Karen Handel invited the President and the vice president to the district and they both came down to appear at fundraisers. They also recorded get-out-the vote calls for her.

Don’t play a game of trying to distance yourself from the President. Regardless of what commentators say on TV, this is not a winning strategy. You do not gain any new votes, and you alienate yourself from voters who are inclined to vote for you. Further, you invite endless questions about your “distance” rather than the issues you want to talk about. The fact is, President Trump is simply his own brand, and the idea that you can successfully turn a Republican member or candidate “into” President Trump was a strategy that Democrats tried in dozens of campaigns in 2016. It failed badly then, and it just failed again in Georgia.

Lesson #7: Politics is a team sport, but candidates matter the most. Karen Handel is one of the hardest working, most disciplined candidates we have ever worked with. Under tremendous pressure, she set the messaging for the race and performed magnificently in debates and on the stump. In addition to providing accurate data, the RNC spent millions of dollars on an effective ground game operation. The NRCC also deserves a tremendous amount of credit for investing in the race during the primary; they helped drive Republican turnout and ensured that Ossoff did not reach 50% and win the race outright in the first round. Our outside allies like the Congressional Leadership Fund, Ending Spending, America First Policies and the US Chamber of Commerce all did a great job too.

But if you don’t have a leader like Karen Handel, no amount of outside help is going to matter. Just ask the outside groups that spent millions on Jon Ossoff.

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