Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for May 19, 2017

19
May

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections for May 19, 2017

Button Gwinnett died on May 19, 1777 of a gunshot wound received in a duel with Lachlan McIntosh.

On May 19-20, 1791, George Washington spent his second and third days in Augusta, where he visited Richmond Academy. Washington left Georgia on May 21, 1791 to go to Columbia, South Carolina.

Georgia ratified the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which governs voting for President and Vice President on May 19, 1804.

The Battle of Spotsylvania ended on May 19, 1864. In Georgia, the Affair at Cassville occurred on May 19, 1864.

Blue jeans with copper rivets were patented by Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis on May 20, 1873.

On May 20, 1916, more than 20,000 visited Stone Mountain for the dedication ceremony to mark the beginning of a Confederate memorial on the north face.

On May 19, 1933, the Atlanta City Council voted to allow beer sales in the city.

On May 21, 1936, FDR signed the Rural Electrification Act, attributing it to events that occurred when he visited Georgia in 1924.

The Rubik’s Cube is 43 years old today.

When, in the spring of 1974, Ernő Rubik, a Hungarian professor of design, invented his eponymous cube, he had no idea that it would become one of the world’s best-selling toys. Nor did he envision that it would impact fields as diverse as science, art, and design – the subject of “Beyond Rubik’s Cube”, an exhibit at the Liberty Science Center, in Jersey City, New Jersey, that opened 26 April to celebrate the puzzle’s 40th anniversary. And he certainly couldn’t have imagined that, one day, his puzzle would be at the center of a competitive sport in which the top performers can re-solve it in less time than it takes to read this sentence aloud.

The first Rubik’s Cube competitions began in the early 1980s and were largely a promotional affair that vanished with the collapse of the initial fad for the puzzle. But in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the Internet allowed hobbyists around the world to find each other and run competitions of their own. More than 1,700 competitions have taken place in 66 countries since the 2004 founding of the World Cube Association, a governing body modeled after FIFA, the arbiter of international soccer. (Unlike, soccer, however, there is no qualification for any of these tourneys, including the World Championship: anyone can sign up.)

On May 19, 1977, “Smokey and the Bandit” was released.

On May 20, 1995, the section of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House was closed to automotive traffic.

The 400th episode of The Simpsons aired on May 20, 2007.

Herman Cain announced his candidacy for President of the United States on May 21, 2011.

President Barack Obama delivered the commencement address at Morehouse College on May 19, 2013.

Three years ago today, Georgia voters went to the polls in the earliest Primary elections in modern history. In the Republican Primary, 605,355 ballots were cast in the Senate contest, while the Democratic Primary for Senate saw 328,710 ballots.

Georgia Politics, Campaigns, and Elections

Governor Nathan Deal, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, and GDOT Commissioner Russell McMurry attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the re-opening of the collapsed section of I-85 in Atlanta yesterday.

“When this portion of I-85 collapsed on March 30, Georgia residents and motorists from around the Southeast were confronted by an unexpected and tremendous challenge,” said Deal. “The Georgia Department of Transportation, employees of C.W. Matthews and the people of Georgia responded remarkably by overcoming this challenge in just six short weeks. Georgia’s success is largely the result of strong partnerships that we enjoy, and the same can be said of this particular chapter in our unfolding story. In Georgia, we get things done, and this is a prime example of multiple levels of government, the private sector and the general public working together for the best possible result. I commend the efforts of everyone who worked to make the early reopening of I-85 possible.”

This high-traffic section of I-85 carries nearly 243,000 vehicles each day under normal circumstances. GDOT worked around the clock, totaling 54,000 hours of manpower, to rebuild and replace the 700-foot section of roadway quickly and safely, saving motorists an estimated $27 million by reopening the corridor ahead of original projections. In total, crews removed 13 million pounds of debris, and replaced 13 columns, 61 beams and four caps.

First Lady Sandra Deal will dedicate a garden at the Governor’s Mansion featuring camellias named after Georgia first ladies.

Two years ago, The Tifton Garden Club named a camellia Sandra Deal, after the state’s first lady. The camellia was provided by [camellia expert Mark] Crawford, according to a press release.

The first lady wanted other camellias named for previous first ladies planted in a separate garden at the mansion. Other camellias provided by Crawford have been named for Rosalynn Carter, Mary Perdue and Marie Barnes.

The camellia Betty Foy Sanders was named in 1965 by a grower in Statesboro and has been commercially available for several years.

Plans are to name a camellia for each of the other first ladies within the next year while Sandra Deal lives in the Governor’s Mansion.

The Democratic National Committee will hire 10 new field directors in the Sixth District Special Runoff Election.

The push will allow the state party to hire 10 new field organizers who will target voters that did not cast a ballot in the April 18 election. The field team will mainly aim at inclusivity to gain the support of minority groups, including outreach in multiple languages.

“The emerging coalition of African American, Latino, and AAPI voters in Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District have been at the heart of the resistance and will be at the heart of Jon Ossoff’s victory in June,” DNC Chairman Tom Perez said in a statement.

I probably wouldn’t complain if they sent Alyssa Milano back to the district.

From TheHill.com:

Minutes after the DNC announcement, the House Majority PAC — a super PAC tied to House Democratic leadership — announced that it would sink $700,000 in the district.

The majority of that will be in the form of a half-million dollar ad buy in partnership with the non-profit Patriot Majority. The remaining $200,000 will go toward turning out Democratic votes.

Special Runoff Election voters in Senate District 32 may have set a new state record for turnout.

The 32,673 people who voted in this week’s state Senate runoff may have just broken a turnout record for special legislative runoffs in Georgia.

No other similar legislative runoff has had more voters, according to state records going back to 1996.

The Gwinnett County Board of Education adopted a $2 billion, yes, billion with a “b,” dollar FY 2018 budget.

After the superintendent called it an “investment portfolio” for the students and community, the Gwinnett County Board of Education on Thursday adopted a $2 billion budget for the coming year.

“You do with what you have and try to prioritize those things and spend our money wisely,” CEO/Superintendent J. Alvin Wilbanks said during a fourth meeting discussing the budget in public.

Thursday was the second public hearing where citizens could address the Board, but none did. Only one resident spoke at a similar meeting last week. The School Board and senior district staff previously had two other meetings beginning in March to outline the budget.

Overall, the budget is $2.092 billion, an increase of about $37 million or 1.8 percent from last year. Much of the increase is tied to an additional 1,972 students expected in August to raise the overall enrollment to more than 180,000, and raises for teachers and all other employees.

DeKalb County Police rescued more sex trafficking victims than any other agency in Georgia last year.

The report said the Internet Crimes Against Children/Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children Unit worked 34 sex trafficking cases last year. They resulted in 15 victims rescued.

The unit also received a “Certificate of Excellence” from the Georgia Bureau of Investigation in 2016.

The unit also investigated 45 cases of online child exploitation, executed 44 search warrants and made more than 30 arrests.

Hall County’s planning efforts revolve around population growth and the traffic issues that results.

Former Warner Robins city council member John Williams attended the most recent council meeting after being released from federal prison.

Muscogee County schools Assistant Superintendent Rebecca Braaten has resigned.

Ogeechee Riverkeeper Emily Markesteyn Kurilla is leaving her position after six years.

Dusty Nix of the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer lauds U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue for influencing President Trump’s position on NAFTA.

The North American Free Trade Agreement, signed into law by then-President Bill Clinton with the public endorsement of every living former president, was one of candidate Donald Trump’s prime targets. Calling it “the worst trade deal ever,” the GOP nominee said scrapping NAFTA would be a top priority.

According to WSJ, the president planned on moving full speed ahead to show action on some of his top agenda items, including NAFTA, in the first 100 days of his administration. But Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto and Canadian President Justin Trudeau urged him to reconsider, and Trump said he’d think about it. Then, according to the Times, “the former Georgia governor and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross persuaded the president to stay his decision to scrap NAFTA by showing him a map of places in the country that would be hard-hit in the event of its demise.”

Perdue has also announced that the USDA is creating a new position of undersecretary for international trade, about which he said in a video presentation for the department, “I want someone who wakes up every morning and asks the question, ‘Where can I sell more U.S. products today, and what are the barriers to trade that we can take down today?’”

The previous Georgia governor appears to have provided the Trump administration with some wise counsel on international trade, at least with regard to agricultural products. If only his successor, the incumbent Georgia governor, could do the same with regard to criminal justice reform.

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