Adoptable Georgia Dogs for May 8, 2015

8
May

Adoptable Georgia Dogs for May 8, 2015

Krystal

Krystal is a very pretty Chocolate Lab. She is about 3 years old. Krystal was picked up as a stray and has recently had a litter of puppies. Krystal is available for adoption from the Carroll County Animal Shelter in Carrollton, GA.
Diego
Diego is a gorgeous boy. He is a Labrador Retriever-mix but smaller and more compact than a full-blooded Lab. He is full grown at 2 years of age. His coat is charcoal gray with a silver sheen. He does have some white in his coat – but only on the very tips of his feet. Diego is available for adoption from the Carroll County Animal Shelter in Carrollton, GA.

Suzie
Suzie is a pretty little Terrier. She is between small and medium sized and has a coat that is coarse textured and reddish-gold in color. Suzie is about 4 years old so has already been trained to walk on a leash. Suzie is available for adoption from the Carroll County Animal Shelter in Carrollton, GA.

In Augusta, a subcommittee looking at animal ordinances has recommended a $100 fee for unaltered pets, according to the Augusta Chronicle.

Though they stopped short of making pet spaying and neutering mandatory, an Augusta subcommittee agreed Thursday to impose a relatively steep licensing fee for owners of unaltered pets.

Coupled with a discounted $10 lifetime fee for spayed and neutered animals, a $100 annual license fee allowing pets to remain able to breed would “discourage the backyard breeders, the indiscriminate breeders,” said veterinarian David Tribby, a member of the panel.

“Totally mandatory spay and neuter is going to be a very tough sell,” said Commissioner Sammie Sias, a subcommittee member who moderated the meeting.

Committee members and several rescue group members in the audience debated nuances of the policy – whether to charge the fee annually, or every three years with a rabies shot, whether required microchip services tend to expire, and whether to allow a first litter or impose a “litter limit” on animals – for more than an hour, but eventually agreed on charging the fees for altered and unaltered animals.

The $10 lifetime rate for altered animals is fair and tells animal owners “the county is on their side,” while the $100 fee for unaltered pets will serve as “a deterrent that also will help prevent more litters,” said Lorna Barrett, who has a rescue group.

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