Is Brian Laurens a scofflaw?

Let’s first check out a definition. Here’s one:

A person who flouts the law, esp. by failing to comply with a law that is difficult to enforce effectively

And here’s another:

US informal a person who habitually flouts or violates the law, esp one who fails to pay debts or answer summonses

That second definition is a little bit tougher and might get us a little closer to slander-ville if we used it about someone. It’s the addition of “habitually” that makes it tougher, as “habitual violator” has a precise legal meaning in the State of Georgia and even used informally probably requires more than one instance of flouting or failing to comply with the law. And if you used the term to imply that someone had failed to answer a summons, you might be making a statement of fact that he or she had committed the crime of failure to appear.

We’re probably safer presenting a situation and asking if you think it fits the definition of “scofflaw,” as used informally in the first definition.

Now let’s watch a video and see if we think it fits the definition.

In this video, you’ll see Brian Laurens, a Republican political consultant and candidate for State House District 21 in the February 5th runoff election, as he deals with a police officer or sheriff’s deputy who has pulled him over for an alleged traffic violation.

Jim Galloway over at Political Insider surmises that the “Tim” to whom Brian Laurens referred is Holly Springs Mayor Tim Downing. Downing’s bio on the Holly Springs website notes that Mayor Downing also serves as a Deputy Sheriff for Cherokee County.

While you watch this, consider what happens if Laurens is elected and gets a special State House of Representatives car tag. Do you think it would increase or decrease his willingness to obey traffic signals?

In this video, also shot by police or sheriff’s deputies, it sounds like Brian Laurens is saying he intended to take down the stop signs that he found offensive.

Georgia voters do not need this kind of bully as an elected official.

When asked about the incident at a forum sponsored by the Cherokee County Republican Party, Laurens tried to defend himself by claiming that the stop sign is a symptom of “government regulation gone wild.”

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