Senator Saxby Chambliss: there is a difference between raising revenues and raising taxes

In an Op-Ed published in the Albany Herald, Senator Saxby Chambliss writes:

My voting record as a member of the House, and now as a member of the Senate, confirms that I am not in favor of tax increases. I have never supported or voted for tax increases, and I don’t intend to start now.

Until we cut spending, control entitlements and enact meaningful tax reform our country will continue to morph into a European-type economy and our freedoms will continue to erode.

Entitlement reform generates heated debates — along with some outright fights — in Congress. This issue is sensitive, yet we must address it and we must successfully reform entitlements if we are ever to reduce the deficit.

And last, tax reform also generates heated, emotional debate. Tax reform is not tax raising. There is a major difference between raising revenues and raising taxes.

We don’t have to raise taxes to raise revenue. If we remove loopholes from the tax code while keeping or modifying deductions that benefit many Americans, the revenue generated will actually result in lower tax rates for individuals while giving the government more resources to pay down the debt. That’s a win-win. And that is not a tax increase.

Yet there are some who inexplicably call any tax reform that generates additional revenue a tax increase. I call it giving hardworking Americans a tax break while making our country financially solvent.

There are other steps we also need to take, such as lowering corporate rates, which now stand at nearly 40 percent, the highest of the world’s large developed economies. And I am the original Senate sponsor of the FairTax, which would allow Americans to pay taxes only on what they spend. But Senate leadership has failed to bring the measure up for a vote. Now we must try other avenues. In fact, we don’t have much time to take action.

My job is to protect taxpayers, not special interests. That means analyzing every aspect of the federal budget — including the tax code — to find savings to help trim our debt, before future generations are forced to raise taxes.

The answer is not to raise taxes and keep spending like there is no tomorrow. The answer lies in both parties coming together for the good of the country to reduce spending, control entitlements and reform our monstrous tax code.

Bolding added, and does not indicate my agreement, just emphasis.

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